On Being Tumblr

Apr 10

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Apr 09

"Look well to the growing edge. All around us worlds are dying and new worlds are being born; all around us life is dying and life is being born. The fruit ripens on the tree, the roots are silently at work in the darkness of the earth against a time when there shall be new lives, fresh blossoms, green fruit. Such is the growing edge! It is the extra breath from the exhausted lung, the one more thing to try when all else has failed, the upward reach of life when weariness closes in upon all endeavor. This is the basis of hope in moments of despair, the incentive to carry on when times are out of joint and men have lost their reason, the source of confidence when worlds crash and dreams whiten into ash. The birth of a child — life’s most dramatic answer to death — this is the growing edge incarnate. Look well to the growing edge!" —Howard Thurman
From our resident sage Parker Palmer’s "The Growing Edge of the Beginner’s Mind."

"Look well to the growing edge. All around us worlds are dying and new worlds are being born; all around us life is dying and life is being born. The fruit ripens on the tree, the roots are silently at work in the darkness of the earth against a time when there shall be new lives, fresh blossoms, green fruit. Such is the growing edge! It is the extra breath from the exhausted lung, the one more thing to try when all else has failed, the upward reach of life when weariness closes in upon all endeavor. This is the basis of hope in moments of despair, the incentive to carry on when times are out of joint and men have lost their reason, the source of confidence when worlds crash and dreams whiten into ash. The birth of a child — life’s most dramatic answer to death — this is the growing edge incarnate. Look well to the growing edge!"Howard Thurman

From our resident sage Parker Palmer’s "The Growing Edge of the Beginner’s Mind."

Apr 08

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Apr 07


We’re all drawn to beauty, though our views of beauty may differ widely. Beauty speaks to our hearts, to our souls. We’re attracted to it as moths are to flame. Whether we find beauty in music or a painting, in a poem or a person, a mountain top vista, a windswept lake, or the smile of our dog, we know it when we see it. But what exactly are we seeing? My sense is that when we recognize something as beautiful, we feel ourselves connected to it and somehow to its origin. The ripples of appreciation that beauty generates pay tribute to the source from which it stems.

From this marvelous piece of writing, Humbled by Beauty in the Universe and in Nature.

We’re all drawn to beauty, though our views of beauty may differ widely. Beauty speaks to our hearts, to our souls. We’re attracted to it as moths are to flame. Whether we find beauty in music or a painting, in a poem or a person, a mountain top vista, a windswept lake, or the smile of our dog, we know it when we see it. But what exactly are we seeing? My sense is that when we recognize something as beautiful, we feel ourselves connected to it and somehow to its origin. The ripples of appreciation that beauty generates pay tribute to the source from which it stems.

From this marvelous piece of writing, Humbled by Beauty in the Universe and in Nature.

Apr 05

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Apr 04

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Apr 03

“I did not ask for success, I asked for wonder. And You gave it to me.” — ~Abraham Joshua Heschel, a prayer from Heschel’s book of Yiddish poems remembered by a listener because of this post on failure and curiosity.

Apr 02

There is religion in everything around us
A calm and holy religion
In the unbreathing things in Nature
It is a meek and blessed influence
Stealing in as it were unaware upon the heart
It comes quickly, and without excitement,
It has no terror, no gloom.
It does not rouse up the passions,
It is untrammeled by creeds
It is written on the arched sky,
It looks out from every star,
It is on the sailing cloud, and in the invisible wind
It is among the hills and valleys of the earth
Where the shrubless mountain-top pierces the thin atmosphere
of eternal winter
Or where the mighty forest fluctuates before the strong wind
With its dark waves of green foliage.
It is spread out like a legible language upon
the broad face of an unsleeping ocean.
It is the poetry of nature
It is that which uplifts the spirit within us
And which opens to our imagination a world of spiritual beauty and holiness.
~John Ruskin
Photo by Justin Kern

There is religion in everything around us

A calm and holy religion

In the unbreathing things in Nature

It is a meek and blessed influence

Stealing in as it were unaware upon the heart

It comes quickly, and without excitement,

It has no terror, no gloom.

It does not rouse up the passions,

It is untrammeled by creeds

It is written on the arched sky,

It looks out from every star,

It is on the sailing cloud, and in the invisible wind

It is among the hills and valleys of the earth

Where the shrubless mountain-top pierces the thin atmosphere

of eternal winter

Or where the mighty forest fluctuates before the strong wind

With its dark waves of green foliage.

It is spread out like a legible language upon

the broad face of an unsleeping ocean.

It is the poetry of nature

It is that which uplifts the spirit within us

And which opens to our imagination a world of spiritual beauty and holiness.

~John Ruskin

Photo by Justin Kern

Apr 01

(1) Do not feel absolutely certain of anything.
~Bertrand Russell, from his “Ten Commandments” of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Times op-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."
(Photo by Cornelia Kopp)

(1) Do not feel absolutely certain of anything.


~Bertrand Russell, from his “Ten Commandments” of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Times op-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."

(Photo by Cornelia Kopp)

Mar 31

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Mar 30

Amazing photo and colors in this photo.

Amazing photo and colors in this photo.

(Source: imagesbyromi, via oldtimefriend)

“There is little doubt that the news media amplify and exacerbate social and political divisions. Too often, journalists follow a ‘Noah’s Ark’ approach to coverage in which a strong liberal is paired with a vocal conservative in an ideological food fight. The result is polarization of discourse and ‘false equivalence’ in reporting. This lack of nuanced analysis confuses viewers and makes it difficult for them to sort out the contrasting facts and opinions. People get the sense that there are only two policy options and that there are few gradations or complexities in the positions that are reported.” —

From the Brookings report, "Nudging News Producers and Consumers Toward More Thoughtful, Less Polarized Discourse," by Darrell West and Beth Stone. A worthy read.

This is a tension we’ve experienced first-hand when programming live events for The Civil Conversations Project. We’ve been questioned by producers and journalists in public radio news rooms about our guest choices for conversations on gay marriage and abortion. But, there have also been some really wonderful advocates, newsroom managers like Chris Worthington of Minnesota Public Radio too.

Mar 28

The tunnel to Detroit’s Concourse C never fails to delight!

The tunnel to Detroit’s Concourse C never fails to delight!

(Source: trentgilliss)