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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

There is religion in everything around us
A calm and holy religion
In the unbreathing things in Nature
It is a meek and blessed influence
Stealing in as it were unaware upon the heart
It comes quickly, and without excitement,
It has no terror, no gloom.
It does not rouse up the passions,
It is untrammeled by creeds
It is written on the arched sky,
It looks out from every star,
It is on the sailing cloud, and in the invisible wind
It is among the hills and valleys of the earth
Where the shrubless mountain-top pierces the thin atmosphere
of eternal winter
Or where the mighty forest fluctuates before the strong wind
With its dark waves of green foliage.
It is spread out like a legible language upon
the broad face of an unsleeping ocean.
It is the poetry of nature
It is that which uplifts the spirit within us
And which opens to our imagination a world of spiritual beauty and holiness.
~John Ruskin
Photo by Justin Kern

There is religion in everything around us

A calm and holy religion

In the unbreathing things in Nature

It is a meek and blessed influence

Stealing in as it were unaware upon the heart

It comes quickly, and without excitement,

It has no terror, no gloom.

It does not rouse up the passions,

It is untrammeled by creeds

It is written on the arched sky,

It looks out from every star,

It is on the sailing cloud, and in the invisible wind

It is among the hills and valleys of the earth

Where the shrubless mountain-top pierces the thin atmosphere

of eternal winter

Or where the mighty forest fluctuates before the strong wind

With its dark waves of green foliage.

It is spread out like a legible language upon

the broad face of an unsleeping ocean.

It is the poetry of nature

It is that which uplifts the spirit within us

And which opens to our imagination a world of spiritual beauty and holiness.

~John Ruskin

Photo by Justin Kern

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(1) Do not feel absolutely certain of anything.
~Bertrand Russell, from his “Ten Commandments” of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Times op-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."
(Photo by Cornelia Kopp)

(1) Do not feel absolutely certain of anything.


~Bertrand Russell, from his “Ten Commandments” of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Times op-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."

(Photo by Cornelia Kopp)

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"The opposite of depression is not happiness, but vitality, and these days, my life is vital, even on the days when I’m sad. I felt that funeral in my brain, and I sat next to the colossus at the edge of the world, and I have discovered something inside of myself that I would have to call a soul that I had never formulated until that day 20 years ago when hell came to pay me a surprise visit. I think that while I hated being depressed and would hate to be depressed again, I’ve found a way to love my depression. I love it because it has forced me to find and cling to joy. I love it because each day I decide, sometimes gamely, and sometimes against the moment’s reason, to cleave to the reasons for living. And that, I think, is a highly privileged rapture.”

This TED talk from Andrew Solomon is astounding in its honesty and depth. A necessary complement to our show on suicide.

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Easy listening on this Sunday evening from allegroassai:

Joseph Haydn:

Concerto for Piano in D major, H 18 no. 2 - I. Vivace

Martha Argerich, Piano

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Amazing photo and colors in this photo.

Amazing photo and colors in this photo.

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There is little doubt that the news media amplify and exacerbate social and political divisions. Too often, journalists follow a ‘Noah’s Ark’ approach to coverage in which a strong liberal is paired with a vocal conservative in an ideological food fight. The result is polarization of discourse and ‘false equivalence’ in reporting. This lack of nuanced analysis confuses viewers and makes it difficult for them to sort out the contrasting facts and opinions. People get the sense that there are only two policy options and that there are few gradations or complexities in the positions that are reported.
-

From the Brookings report, "Nudging News Producers and Consumers Toward More Thoughtful, Less Polarized Discourse," by Darrell West and Beth Stone. A worthy read.

This is a tension we’ve experienced first-hand when programming live events for The Civil Conversations Project. We’ve been questioned by producers and journalists in public radio news rooms about our guest choices for conversations on gay marriage and abortion. But, there have also been some really wonderful advocates, newsroom managers like Chris Worthington of Minnesota Public Radio too.

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The tunnel to Detroit’s Concourse C never fails to delight!

The tunnel to Detroit’s Concourse C never fails to delight!

Tagged: #airport
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This is such an important conversation. A beautiful musing on community from this week’s show with Jennifer Michael Hecht on suicide.

Ms. Tippett: There’s a way you’re framing this, and you invoke, you know, Maimonides saying, you know, he who destroys himself, destroys the world. You invoke Levinas, French Talmudic scholar that our acts of friendship are the most real and knowable aspect of the entire universe. I mean, you — the discussion you want to have is not so much against suicide, but for staying alive for each other. It’s choosing life.

Ms. Hecht: Yeah. And, it’s, yeah it’s choosing living.

Ms. Tippett: Yeah, choosing staying alive.

Ms. Hecht: Choosing staying alive, and yes, I thought of myself as an individual before I started doing this thinking in a way that I no longer do and I feel better.

Ms. Tippett: Right.

Ms. Hecht: It doesn’t really mean you have to go out and do a lot of communal things, though all sorts of studies show that will help. Force yourself to go be with other people is as a good start, but it’s also just this internal thing where I notice more that I’m part of this human thing. And that there’s no such thing as wasted contributions.

Ms. Hecht: And so, it really is — it’s a better feeling about what we are and what we’re doing, and most people through history had it without trying because they lived in tiny communities that were besieged by either drought or flood or whatever, and they had to work together to do anything. And they were more aware of their connection to each other. And, nowadays, we’re very…

Ms. Tippett: In a way, that connection was also just forced on them, right? It wasn’t optional. It’s optional for us.

Ms. Hecht: Right.

Ms. Tippett: Yeah.

Ms. Hecht: It’s optional, and I suggest taking that option whenever you want. But just be more aware that we have these all sorts of secret web-like connections to each other. And that sometimes when you can’t see what’s important about you, other people can. You know, even Augustine said you can’t kill yourself because God said thou shalt not kill and that’s it.

Ms. Tippett: Right. I mean, I feel like you sound a little bit like Maimonides when you say this is something you rejecting suicide is a huge act within a community. I also think it changes the universe. And you wrote, “Either the universe is a cold, dead place with a little growth of sentient but atomized beings, each all by him or herself trying to generate meaning, or we are in a universe that is alive with a growth of sentient beings whose members have made a pact with each other to persevere.”

Ms. Hecht: Yeah. That feels powerful to me. I feel like just the respect of the idea of love and meaning.

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The view from Kalamazoo. So gorgeous!
(via trentgilliss)

The view from Kalamazoo. So gorgeous!

(via trentgilliss)

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"And you—what of your rushed and useful life? Imagine setting it all down— papers, plans, appointments, everything— leaving only a note: “Gone to the fields to be lovely. Be back when I’m through blooming.”


~Lynn Ungar’s poetic words in this essential bit of wisdom from Parker Palmer.

Photo by Charles Knowles

"And you—what of your rushed
and useful life? Imagine setting it all down—
papers, plans, appointments, everything—
leaving only a note: “Gone
to the fields to be lovely. Be back
when I’m through blooming.”

~Lynn Ungar’s poetic words in this essential bit of wisdom from Parker Palmer.

Photo by Charles Knowles

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"When the sun shines, it shines without any discrimination; it shines on every point of the country, every nook and corner.
We should be like that.”
~A little bit of sunshiny wisdom from The Dalai Lama, from The Way to Freedom. 
(Photo by Tommy Clark)

"When the sun shines, it shines without any discrimination; it shines on every point of the country, every nook and corner.

We should be like that.”

~A little bit of sunshiny wisdom from The Dalai Lama, from The Way to Freedom.

(Photo by Tommy Clark)

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“There is in Celtic mythology the notion of ‘thin places’ in the universe where the visible and the invisible world come into their closest proximity. To seek such places is the vocation of the wise and the good — and for those that find them, the clearest communication between the temporal and eternal. Mountains and rivers are particularly favored as thin places marking invariably as they do, the horizontal and perpendicular frontiers. But perhaps the ultimate of these thin places in the human condition are the experiences people are likely to have as they encounter suffering, joy, and mystery.”
~Peter Gomes, as quoted in Sarah Blanton’s lovely meditation on thin places on the waters of Tennessee.

“There is in Celtic mythology the notion of ‘thin places’ in the universe where the visible and the invisible world come into their closest proximity. To seek such places is the vocation of the wise and the good — and for those that find them, the clearest communication between the temporal and eternal. Mountains and rivers are particularly favored as thin places marking invariably as they do, the horizontal and perpendicular frontiers. But perhaps the ultimate of these thin places in the human condition are the experiences people are likely to have as they encounter suffering, joy, and mystery.”

~Peter Gomes, as quoted in Sarah Blanton’s lovely meditation on thin places on the waters of Tennessee.

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"In a world where secular buildings whisper to us relentlessly of earthly power, the cathedrals that punctuate the skylines of great towns and cities may continue to furnish an imaginative holding space for the priorities of the spirit."
~Alain de Botton, from Status Anxiety. A good reminder to listen to "A School of Life for Atheists."

"In a world where secular buildings whisper to us relentlessly of earthly power, the cathedrals that punctuate the skylines of great towns and cities may continue to furnish an imaginative holding space for the priorities of the spirit."

~Alain de Botton, from Status Anxiety. A good reminder to listen to "A School of Life for Atheists."

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Fourteen moments of precious of a mother and her four-year-old daughter in various yoga poses. Is there anything more joyful than this to wake up to on a Monday morn?
(via 123 Inspiration)

Fourteen moments of precious of a mother and her four-year-old daughter in various yoga poses. Is there anything more joyful than this to wake up to on a Monday morn?

(via 123 Inspiration)

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This illustration of the cosmic microwave background, heat remaining from the origin of the universe, confirms predictions of inflationary theory. The universe is expanding just as described by Einstein’s theory of gravity. As Dan Vergano writes in National Geographic:

"The strong gravitational wave findings support some of the simplest models of inflation and explain how the mass of the universe first escaped from subatomic size without falling in on itself in its very first moments.
That means that in its very first moments, the entire universe reached a size far, far larger than what is observable or will ever be observable to humanity (the “observable” universe is about 92 billion light-years across).”

Amazing. And all done with a big dish.

This illustration of the cosmic microwave background, heat remaining from the origin of the universe, confirms predictions of inflationary theory. The universe is expanding just as described by Einstein’s theory of gravity. As Dan Vergano writes in National Geographic:

"The strong gravitational wave findings support some of the simplest models of inflation and explain how the mass of the universe first escaped from subatomic size without falling in on itself in its very first moments.

That means that in its very first moments, the entire universe reached a size far, far larger than what is observable or will ever be observable to humanity (the “observable” universe is about 92 billion light-years across).”

Amazing. And all done with a big dish.

Comments