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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.


"And you—what of your rushed and useful life? Imagine setting it all down— papers, plans, appointments, everything— leaving only a note: “Gone to the fields to be lovely. Be back when I’m through blooming.”


~Lynn Ungar’s poetic words in this essential bit of wisdom from Parker Palmer.

Photo by Charles Knowles

"And you—what of your rushed
and useful life? Imagine setting it all down—
papers, plans, appointments, everything—
leaving only a note: “Gone
to the fields to be lovely. Be back
when I’m through blooming.”

~Lynn Ungar’s poetic words in this essential bit of wisdom from Parker Palmer.

Photo by Charles Knowles

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"When the sun shines, it shines without any discrimination; it shines on every point of the country, every nook and corner.
We should be like that.”
~A little bit of sunshiny wisdom from The Dalai Lama, from The Way to Freedom. 
(Photo by Tommy Clark)

"When the sun shines, it shines without any discrimination; it shines on every point of the country, every nook and corner.

We should be like that.”

~A little bit of sunshiny wisdom from The Dalai Lama, from The Way to Freedom.

(Photo by Tommy Clark)

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“There is in Celtic mythology the notion of ‘thin places’ in the universe where the visible and the invisible world come into their closest proximity. To seek such places is the vocation of the wise and the good — and for those that find them, the clearest communication between the temporal and eternal. Mountains and rivers are particularly favored as thin places marking invariably as they do, the horizontal and perpendicular frontiers. But perhaps the ultimate of these thin places in the human condition are the experiences people are likely to have as they encounter suffering, joy, and mystery.”
~Peter Gomes, as quoted in Sarah Blanton’s lovely meditation on thin places on the waters of Tennessee.

“There is in Celtic mythology the notion of ‘thin places’ in the universe where the visible and the invisible world come into their closest proximity. To seek such places is the vocation of the wise and the good — and for those that find them, the clearest communication between the temporal and eternal. Mountains and rivers are particularly favored as thin places marking invariably as they do, the horizontal and perpendicular frontiers. But perhaps the ultimate of these thin places in the human condition are the experiences people are likely to have as they encounter suffering, joy, and mystery.”

~Peter Gomes, as quoted in Sarah Blanton’s lovely meditation on thin places on the waters of Tennessee.

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"In a world where secular buildings whisper to us relentlessly of earthly power, the cathedrals that punctuate the skylines of great towns and cities may continue to furnish an imaginative holding space for the priorities of the spirit."
~Alain de Botton, from Status Anxiety. A good reminder to listen to "A School of Life for Atheists."

"In a world where secular buildings whisper to us relentlessly of earthly power, the cathedrals that punctuate the skylines of great towns and cities may continue to furnish an imaginative holding space for the priorities of the spirit."

~Alain de Botton, from Status Anxiety. A good reminder to listen to "A School of Life for Atheists."

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Fourteen moments of precious of a mother and her four-year-old daughter in various yoga poses. Is there anything more joyful than this to wake up to on a Monday morn?
(via 123 Inspiration)

Fourteen moments of precious of a mother and her four-year-old daughter in various yoga poses. Is there anything more joyful than this to wake up to on a Monday morn?

(via 123 Inspiration)

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This illustration of the cosmic microwave background, heat remaining from the origin of the universe, confirms predictions of inflationary theory. The universe is expanding just as described by Einstein’s theory of gravity. As Dan Vergano writes in National Geographic:

"The strong gravitational wave findings support some of the simplest models of inflation and explain how the mass of the universe first escaped from subatomic size without falling in on itself in its very first moments.
That means that in its very first moments, the entire universe reached a size far, far larger than what is observable or will ever be observable to humanity (the “observable” universe is about 92 billion light-years across).”

Amazing. And all done with a big dish.

This illustration of the cosmic microwave background, heat remaining from the origin of the universe, confirms predictions of inflationary theory. The universe is expanding just as described by Einstein’s theory of gravity. As Dan Vergano writes in National Geographic:

"The strong gravitational wave findings support some of the simplest models of inflation and explain how the mass of the universe first escaped from subatomic size without falling in on itself in its very first moments.

That means that in its very first moments, the entire universe reached a size far, far larger than what is observable or will ever be observable to humanity (the “observable” universe is about 92 billion light-years across).”

Amazing. And all done with a big dish.

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Some days this song is the quickest route to gratitude.

~ A delightfully mellow rendition of Monty Python by Alexander Stamatis

Just remember that you’re standing on a planet that’s evolving
And revolving at nine hundred miles an hour
That’s orbiting at nineteen miles a second, so it’s reckoned
A sun that is the source of all our power

The sun and you and me and all the stars that we can see
Are moving at a million miles a day
In an outer spiral arm, at forty thousand miles an hour
Of the galaxy we call the ‘milky way’

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If you only listen to one thing today, let it be this. A message from Desmond Tutu that we can’t hear enough in this life.

There’s no question about the reality of evil, of injustice, of suffering, but at the center of this existence is a heart beating with love.

That you and I and all of us are incredible. I mean, we really are remarkable things. That we are, as a matter of fact, made for goodness.

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We are not meant, in most cases, to lead separated lives…

We require, natural solitaries or not, the opportunity at times to take a companionable stroll through the deserts of our lives with others who walk the same path, in the hope that they can see the terrain for us with fresh eyes.

We need to reflect with others on the questions that plague us. We seek to discern with others who may be more wise than ourselves. We crave to know the opinions of those less involved than ourselves in the issues that face us, for fear our very proximity to them blinds us as much as it commits us…

Where we come from is a large part of who we are. It is the root of our identity, the place of our growing. It cannot simply be put down because it is not outside of us; it is inside of us — and always will be. Wrestling with the roots of us is part of human spiritual growth

- ~Sister Joan Chittister (from Welcome to the Wisdom of the World)
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Came across this powerful image today while looking for an image of thawing in springtime for Parker Palmer’s post. 

These are ice sculptures by Brazilian artist Nele Azevedo melting on the steps of Berlin’s Concert Hall at the Gendarmenmarkt.

The particular medium of melting ice seems to capture some of the essential fragility and vulnerability of being human that might otherwise be lost. 

Beautiful. 

(photo by John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images)

Came across this powerful image today while looking for an image of thawing in springtime for Parker Palmer’s post.

These are ice sculptures by Brazilian artist Nele Azevedo melting on the steps of Berlin’s Concert Hall at the Gendarmenmarkt.

The particular medium of melting ice seems to capture some of the essential fragility and vulnerability of being human that might otherwise be lost. 

Beautiful. 

(photo by John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images)

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A little bit of Celtic musical serendipity for your St. Patrick’s Day evening.

(Audio engineers will cringe)

Accidentally heard this lovely poem by John O’Donohue playing against this marvelous piece of improv by Peter Gabriel, Zoe Keating & Lera Auerbach today. If you open the players in different browsers and start the music at around the 1:24 mark, it’s quite simply spectacular.

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Today at 1 pm Pacific, The California Endowment is live-streaming video of their day-long symposium in Los Angeles that explores everyday courage and resilience. What research, policies, and practices can help communities overcome adversity and provide a path to make health happen in schools and in neighborhoods.

Here’s a tentative line-up of some of the talks and conversations that will be happening:

[12:30 pm - 1:20 pm] Health Happens with Everyday Courage with Dr. Robert K. Ross, president & CEO of The California Endowment

[1:25 pm - 1:45 pm] Dissolving Stress with Bob Roth, executive director of the David Lynch Foundation 

[1:45 pm - 2:15 pm] The Brain Science of Adversity - Krista Tippett, host of our program On Being interviews Joyce Dorado of UCSF HEARTS Program

[2:15 pm - 2:40 pm] Paper Tigers with Jamie Redford, documentary filmmaker

[3:00 - 4:00 pm] Building Community Resilience - Krista Tippett, host of our program On Being interviews Dr. Rita Nakashima Brock of the Soul Repair Center and James Anderson of the Anti-Recidivism Coalition 

[4:00 - 4:25 pm] 3PA > 1NT with RZA, leader of Wu-Tang Clan

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Filmmaker Wes Anderson talks The Grand Budapest HotelMarcel Proust, and Francois Truffaut at NYPL Live with the lively mind of Paul Holdengraber:

"Almost every Truffaut movie is his adaptation of a book he loves. And, his movies are filled with books. I share that affection for books, just even as objects as well as great stories."

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Yes, it’s live-streaming video of an eagle nest on a Georgia college campus. Just amazing.

(h/t to Doug Denton for the recommendation)

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What a gorgeous piece of music to wake up to: “Gayane’s Adagio” by the  Armenian composer Aram Khachaturian. He’s better known for his frenetic "Sabre Dance" but this performance by the St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra (conducted by Andre Anichanov) is a welcome contrast.

(Thanks for the introduction, antoniopolophotography!)

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