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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
If I can’t tell people why we are doing this, how can I expect others to share their stories?— Nathan Manske

Nathan Manske is the founder of I’m From Driftwood, which collects the stories of members of the LGBTQ community. This is his story of how collecting these stories changed him, from our Your Audio Selfie series.

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A woman and a girl wash at a tap at a temporary displacement camp set up next to a Kurdish checkpoint on June 13, 2014 in Kalak, Iraq. Found this photo while editing Jeffrey Kaplan’s piece on the Sunni-Shi’itie showdown, "The Iraqi Fall of Saigon?"
(Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

A woman and a girl wash at a tap at a temporary displacement camp set up next to a Kurdish checkpoint on June 13, 2014 in Kalak, Iraq. Found this photo while editing Jeffrey Kaplan’s piece on the Sunni-Shi’itie showdown, "The Iraqi Fall of Saigon?"

(Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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The Native American triad of corn, beans, and squash together, produce more than they ever could alone. The beauty of this truth can be applied to human communities as well. As I’ve been learning in my Permaculture Design Course, we can create people guilds too. We all have different strengths to contribute, and by carefully building our communities so every individual is able to both give and receive what they need to thrive, we create more than we ever could alone.
- Heather Christensen, from this prompting essay on permaculture and polarization.
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In one way or another, every wisdom tradition I know says that what we need is here. It’s just a matter of opening our eyes and appreciating what I call ‘secrets hidden in plain sight.’ But we can’t do that when we’re obsessing about the past or the future, or about what we don’t have, or allowing a thousand distractions to prevent us from noticing the gift of ‘here and now.’
- Parker Palmer, from "What We Need Is Here"
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Geologist Bill Simpson cleans Sue, a 67-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex on display at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois with a pink feather duster. Sue is the largest, most complete, and best preserved T. Rex ever discovered
A little humor for your Wednesday, found in preparation for this week’s show on the evolution of the science-religion debate.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Geologist Bill Simpson cleans Sue, a 67-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex on display at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois with a pink feather duster. Sue is the largest, most complete, and best preserved T. Rex ever discovered

A little humor for your Wednesday, found in preparation for this week’s show on the evolution of the science-religion debate.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Happened upon this utterly joyful photograph by Fabiana Zonca while looking for a lead image for Parker Palmer’s post "What You Need Is Here." The photographer’s caption is quite endearing too:

"You are my hero!!!
This little girl was lovely and full of life: she could not help herself but laughing and running around. She was happy as only a kid can be! And when her father hugged her she made this fantastic gesture as to hold in her hands not only his face but her love for him. Irresistibly sweet!!”

Happened upon this utterly joyful photograph by Fabiana Zonca while looking for a lead image for Parker Palmer’s post "What You Need Is Here." The photographer’s caption is quite endearing too:

"You are my hero!!!

This little girl was lovely and full of life: she could not help herself but laughing and running around. She was happy as only a kid can be! And when her father hugged her she made this fantastic gesture as to hold in her hands not only his face but her love for him. Irresistibly sweet!!”

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Having some fun this morning with our senior producer who sent around this video of the baby-faced Jerry Rivera singing “Cara De Niño” performing on Sabado Gigante. Ah, the early 90s were awesome.

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Sir Ian McKellan holds up his hand during a photocall for the documentary, For the Bible Tells Me So, a film that told the story of Bishop Gene Robinson.
By all accounts, this image depicts a very ordinary moment. Yet there’s something about it that is so evocative of the tension between the inner struggle and the public life of Gene Robinson, who in 2003, became the first openly gay bishop of the Episcopal Church of the United States.
(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

Sir Ian McKellan holds up his hand during a photocall for the documentary, For the Bible Tells Me So, a film that told the story of Bishop Gene Robinson.

By all accounts, this image depicts a very ordinary moment. Yet there’s something about it that is so evocative of the tension between the inner struggle and the public life of Gene Robinson, who in 2003, became the first openly gay bishop of the Episcopal Church of the United States.

(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

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“As Ojibwe women, we’re responsible for the water. It’s our responsibility to care for the water, to pray for the water, to sing for the water, to gather the water and then lift those petitions up to the spirits and especially to the water spirits.”

— Sharon Day

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Maria Kochetkova dances Rubies with Andrey at Stanislavsky Theater in Moscow.

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In silence there is eloquence. Stop weaving and see how the pattern improves.
-

Rumi

(via thecalminside)

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Ashwini Ramaswamy of Ragamala Dance performs “Sacred Earth” at On Being on Loring Park during the Northern Spark festival.

Ashwini Ramaswamy of Ragamala Dance performs “Sacred Earth” at On Being on Loring Park during the Northern Spark festival.

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Via Krista Tippett’s 2011 interview with Civil Rights leader Vincent Harding for On Being

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Via Krista Tippett’s 2011 interview with Civil Rights leader Vincent Harding for On Being

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A little girl expresses her joy at the beauty of springtime in Kent in 1946.
It’s this kind of play that Dr. Stuart Brown, director of the National Institute of Play says teaches empathy, trust, irony, and problem solving.
(Photo by George Konig/Keystone Features/Getty Images)

A little girl expresses her joy at the beauty of springtime in Kent in 1946.

It’s this kind of play that Dr. Stuart Brown, director of the National Institute of Play says teaches empathy, trust, irony, and problem solving.

(Photo by George Konig/Keystone Features/Getty Images)

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If one were to get a replay of Michael Jordan in one of the final games of NBA championship and see him zoning down the floor doing some moves he’s never done before and tossing the ball up for a basket, I doubt if, at that time, he is really conscious that the buzzer’s about to go or that — I think he’s outside of time. And I can certainly give you from my own life recollections of that sensation. Just, say last week, I was I in a nice musical concert that was being held in Monterey and, you know, I got lost in the music and had the feeling of, you know, sort of an oceanic feeling of not being there. And it wasn’t something I expected to happen. But it was pleasurable. Watching a grandson of mine on the floor with his stuffed animal talking to it, timeless. And it’s different for, for lots of us.

— Stuart Brown, director of the National Institute of Play, from his 2007 interview, "Play, Spirit, and Character."

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