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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

"The history of our country [Nigeria] is short and turbulent. They all struggle to be heard. Respect comes from understanding each other’s stories. But we shout over each other and forget to listen. If we listened, we would find that what the other person was saying is an echo of what we are saying ourselves."
— Muhtar Bakare, via The Guardian)

"The history of our country [Nigeria] is short and turbulent. They all struggle to be heard. Respect comes from understanding each other’s stories. But we shout over each other and forget to listen. If we listened, we would find that what the other person was saying is an echo of what we are saying ourselves."

— Muhtar Bakare, via The Guardian)

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The sun’s back in Minnesota and you can see patches of green grass. As good a reason to rejoice as I’ve ever heard. ‘

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Funniest line of the day brought to you by Zach Galifianakis, while addressing President Obama and the Affordable Care Act:

"Why would you get the guy that created the Zune to make your website?"
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I love this unusual picture of Easter Island taken from a kite. I’m so used to seeing these statues as larger-than-life, but here they look like birds on a phone wire. Maybe there’s a lesson here about keeping things in perspective :)

(Photo by Pierre Lesage)

I love this unusual picture of Easter Island taken from a kite. I’m so used to seeing these statues as larger-than-life, but here they look like birds on a phone wire. Maybe there’s a lesson here about keeping things in perspective :)

(Photo by Pierre Lesage)

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"The religious freedom laws are a fragile bulwark against a cultural change that most likely cannot be reversed. They carve out an exception to the principle of non-discrimination by sexual orientation that does not apply to race or sex. Even if few business owners take advantage of them, they could prevent future generations from remembering those who turned away gay and lesbian customers as part of the same class of people who put up ‘whites only’ signs in their shop windows."
—From "Why ‘religious freedom’ laws are doomed" by Adam Serwer

"The religious freedom laws are a fragile bulwark against a cultural change that most likely cannot be reversed. They carve out an exception to the principle of non-discrimination by sexual orientation that does not apply to race or sex. Even if few business owners take advantage of them, they could prevent future generations from remembering those who turned away gay and lesbian customers as part of the same class of people who put up ‘whites only’ signs in their shop windows."

—From "Why ‘religious freedom’ laws are doomed" by Adam Serwer

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Dr. Sherwin Nuland died this week at the age of 83. He became well-known for his first book, How We Die, which won the National Book Award in 1994. For him, pondering death was a way of wondering at life — and the infinite variety of processes that maintain human life moment to moment. He reflects on the meaning of life by way of scrupulous and elegant detail about human physiology:

“Wonder is something I share with people of deep faith. They wonder at the universe that God has created, and I wonder at the universe that nature has created. This is a sense of awe that motivates the faithful, motivates me. And when I say motivates, it provides an energy for seeking. Just as the faithful will always say, ‘We are seeking,’ I am seeking.”

We remixed this interview and present it in his honor.

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postcardsfromamerica:

Martin Parr.  Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

postcardsfromamerica:

Martin Parr.  Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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It’s awfully difficult not to love Rufus Wainwright and this catchy ditty he just released on his “best of” album. “Me and Liza.”

Tagged: #music
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Check out the girl on the left. Fun photo and great project, Postcards from America:

Alessandra Sanguinetti
Black River Falls, Wisconsin.

Check out the girl on the left. Fun photo and great project, Postcards from America:

Alessandra Sanguinetti

Black River Falls, Wisconsin.

Tagged: #church #religion
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"Lent offers us an opportunity to slow down, to meander rather than to rush, to allow life to sink in a bit, to find ways to go deeper and not always stay on the surface. A time to observe, to pay attention, and then to act — and in so doing provide the space to move from rush to replenish. When we take this practice seriously, we plant its blessings so that they benefit not only us in our lives for this season, but also extend to the world around us."
~Erin Dunigan, from "The Induced Meandering of Lenten Season"
Photo by Trey Ratcliff

"Lent offers us an opportunity to slow down, to meander rather than to rush, to allow life to sink in a bit, to find ways to go deeper and not always stay on the surface. A time to observe, to pay attention, and then to act — and in so doing provide the space to move from rush to replenish. When we take this practice seriously, we plant its blessings so that they benefit not only us in our lives for this season, but also extend to the world around us."

~Erin Dunigan, from "The Induced Meandering of Lenten Season"

Photo by Trey Ratcliff

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An awesome piece of inter-species jazz shared by a listener in response to this post on the blog:

Do you know about David Rothenberg? He’s a jazz musician and philosopher who plays with animals, including whales. He has also played with birds, even cicadas! Amazing musician.

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I hear echoes of this T. S. Eliot poem everywhere, but especially today, on Ash Wednesday:

Blessed sister, holy mother, spirit of the fountain, spirit of the garden, Suffer us not to mock ourselves with falsehood Teach us to care and not to care Teach us to sit still Even among these rocks, Our peace in His will And even among these rocks Sister, mother And spirit of the river, spirit of the sea, Suffer me not to be separated
And let my cry come unto Thee.

(Photo by Bob Mical on Flickr)

I hear echoes of this T. S. Eliot poem everywhere, but especially today, on Ash Wednesday:

Blessed sister, holy mother, spirit of the fountain, spirit of the garden,
Suffer us not to mock ourselves with falsehood
Teach us to care and not to care
Teach us to sit still
Even among these rocks,
Our peace in His will
And even among these rocks
Sister, mother
And spirit of the river, spirit of the sea,
Suffer me not to be separated

And let my cry come unto Thee.

(Photo by Bob Mical on Flickr)

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Way too awesome, laughingsquid:

The Tom Waits Map, An Interactive Map of Every Location Mentioned In the Songs of Tom Waits
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Just love the poetry of Lia Ices’ harmonies. A soundtrack for your contemplative Tuesday evening :)

It’s nothing less, nothing less between the worldly
And the one self
All this breathing and the truth that’s in your last breath
Don’t it make you want to cry?

So fly, fly and we’ll wear you like a leaf crown
Fly cause your truth is in the solid ground

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"Joy is everywhere; it is in the earth’s green covering of grass; in the blue serenity of the sky; in the reckless exuberance of spring; in the severe abstinence of grey winter; in the living flesh that animates our bodily frame; in the perfect poise of the human figure, noble and upright; in living; in the exercise of all our powers; in the acquisition of knowledge; in fighting evils; in dying for gains we never can share. Joy is there everywhere."
~Rabindranath Tagore, from Sadhana: The Realisation of Life
These nuns playing basketball in 1965 bring a smile to my face. What joy!
(Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)

"Joy is everywhere; it is in the earth’s green covering of grass; in the blue serenity of the sky; in the reckless exuberance of spring; in the severe abstinence of grey winter; in the living flesh that animates our bodily frame; in the perfect poise of the human figure, noble and upright; in living; in the exercise of all our powers; in the acquisition of knowledge; in fighting evils; in dying for gains we never can share. Joy is there everywhere."

~Rabindranath Tagore, from Sadhana: The Realisation of Life

These nuns playing basketball in 1965 bring a smile to my face. What joy!

(Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)

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