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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

I hear echoes of this T. S. Eliot poem everywhere, but especially today, on Ash Wednesday:

Blessed sister, holy mother, spirit of the fountain, spirit of the garden, Suffer us not to mock ourselves with falsehood Teach us to care and not to care Teach us to sit still Even among these rocks, Our peace in His will And even among these rocks Sister, mother And spirit of the river, spirit of the sea, Suffer me not to be separated
And let my cry come unto Thee.

(Photo by Bob Mical on Flickr)

I hear echoes of this T. S. Eliot poem everywhere, but especially today, on Ash Wednesday:

Blessed sister, holy mother, spirit of the fountain, spirit of the garden,
Suffer us not to mock ourselves with falsehood
Teach us to care and not to care
Teach us to sit still
Even among these rocks,
Our peace in His will
And even among these rocks
Sister, mother
And spirit of the river, spirit of the sea,
Suffer me not to be separated

And let my cry come unto Thee.

(Photo by Bob Mical on Flickr)

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Way too awesome, laughingsquid:

The Tom Waits Map, An Interactive Map of Every Location Mentioned In the Songs of Tom Waits
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Just love the poetry of Lia Ices’ harmonies. A soundtrack for your contemplative Tuesday evening :)

It’s nothing less, nothing less between the worldly
And the one self
All this breathing and the truth that’s in your last breath
Don’t it make you want to cry?

So fly, fly and we’ll wear you like a leaf crown
Fly cause your truth is in the solid ground

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"Joy is everywhere; it is in the earth’s green covering of grass; in the blue serenity of the sky; in the reckless exuberance of spring; in the severe abstinence of grey winter; in the living flesh that animates our bodily frame; in the perfect poise of the human figure, noble and upright; in living; in the exercise of all our powers; in the acquisition of knowledge; in fighting evils; in dying for gains we never can share. Joy is there everywhere."
~Rabindranath Tagore, from Sadhana: The Realisation of Life
These nuns playing basketball in 1965 bring a smile to my face. What joy!
(Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)

"Joy is everywhere; it is in the earth’s green covering of grass; in the blue serenity of the sky; in the reckless exuberance of spring; in the severe abstinence of grey winter; in the living flesh that animates our bodily frame; in the perfect poise of the human figure, noble and upright; in living; in the exercise of all our powers; in the acquisition of knowledge; in fighting evils; in dying for gains we never can share. Joy is there everywhere."

~Rabindranath Tagore, from Sadhana: The Realisation of Life

These nuns playing basketball in 1965 bring a smile to my face. What joy!

(Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)

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While in college, I went to see Paco de Lucia with my dad at the Guzman Center for the Performing Arts in Miami. My father plays classical guitar and Paco de Lucia was one of his heroes so seeing him in concert for the first time together was a really big deal for both of us.

I will never forget how my dad’s eyes lit up as he watched this master flamenco guitarist play, how he tapped his fingers along with the music. 66-years-old was far too young to lose this legend. RIP.

~Lily Percy, senior producer

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Though my colleague can’t imagine why anyone would dare try to cover this GNR classic, I can’t resist. I love covers for the exact reason that songs are meant for interpretation. Meet Miche Braden and friends with this very sweet version.

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The last phrase of this charming memory from hallywoods is absolutely pure, “learned to appreciate the beauty and serenity of working a cultivated environment.” I suspect this applies to a world much greater than the fertile earth beneath him:

Been reminded lately about family and folks I’ve cared about who are now gone. It’s good to remember, I think.Lillie married José at sixteen. The oldest of a large family, she was a pastor’s wife, had ten kids, lost two in infancy. The last kid she had was born when Lillie was forty. Shortly thereafter she went back to school to become a nurse, a career she then gave herself to for twenty years. Lillie had her share of shortcomings, could talk her way into (and out of) just about anything. I’m pretty sure she loved her daughter the best she knew how. Sometimes, that’s the best we can expect.José was born in Mexico and was a talented guitar player and singer. Like most religious leaders in the charismatic Pentecostal movement, he was equal parts showman and shaman, mystic and holy man, counselor and friend. A man of passionate words behind the pulpit and few words in front of it, he had an open mind and an open heart, and willingly shared his gardening duties with me, from which I learned to appreciate the beauty and serenity of working a cultivated environment.

The last phrase of this charming memory from hallywoods is absolutely pure, “learned to appreciate the beauty and serenity of working a cultivated environment.” I suspect this applies to a world much greater than the fertile earth beneath him:

Been reminded lately about family and folks I’ve cared about who are now gone. It’s good to remember, I think.

Lillie married José at sixteen. The oldest of a large family, she was a pastor’s wife, had ten kids, lost two in infancy. The last kid she had was born when Lillie was forty. Shortly thereafter she went back to school to become a nurse, a career she then gave herself to for twenty years. Lillie had her share of shortcomings, could talk her way into (and out of) just about anything. I’m pretty sure she loved her daughter the best she knew how. Sometimes, that’s the best we can expect.

José was born in Mexico and was a talented guitar player and singer. Like most religious leaders in the charismatic Pentecostal movement, he was equal parts showman and shaman, mystic and holy man, counselor and friend. A man of passionate words behind the pulpit and few words in front of it, he had an open mind and an open heart, and willingly shared his gardening duties with me, from which I learned to appreciate the beauty and serenity of working a cultivated environment.

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In the deeps are the violence and terror of which psychology has warned us. But if you ride these monsters deeper down, if you drop with them farther over the world’s rim, you find what our sciences cannot locate or name, the substrate, the ocean or matrix or ether which buoys the rest, which gives goodness its power for good, and evil its power for evil, the unified field: our complex and inexplicable caring for each other, and for our life together here. This is given. It is not learned.
- ~Annie Dillard, from Teaching a Stone to Talk: Expeditions and Encounters
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Working late and feeling the love of Alicia Keys and Adam Levine’s unplugged duet of “Wild Horses.” Just what Big Daddy G needed.

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“As a Catholic, you think, `Is this really my religion? It sounds just so wonderfully strange and powerful. I never realized there were such depths to this thing that I observed by going to church every Sunday.’”

Have you ever read Paul Elie? His books Reinventing Bach and The Life You Save May Be Your Own offer brilliant perspectives on people and history most people think they know. In this podcast, "Faith Fired by Literature," Paul Elie takes us on a kind of literary pilgrimage through a Catholic imagination that still resonates in our time with Flannery O’Connor + Walker Percy, social activist Dorothy Day, and the Trappist monk Thomas Merton. A magical listen.

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"The greatest challenge of the day is: how to bring about a revolution of the heart, a revolution which has to start with each one of us? When we begin to take the lowest place, to wash the feet of others, to love our brothers with that burning love, that passion, which led to the cross, then we can truly say, ‘Now I have begun.’"
~Dorothy Day
Here’s an extended version of Ms. Day’s quotation from Loaves and Fishes.

"The greatest challenge of the day is: how to bring about a revolution of the heart, a revolution which has to start with each one of us? When we begin to take the lowest place, to wash the feet of others, to love our brothers with that burning love, that passion, which led to the cross, then we can truly say, ‘Now I have begun.’"

~Dorothy Day

Here’s an extended version of Ms. Day’s quotation from Loaves and Fishes.

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smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Roping
Photography by Michael Anglin (San Angelo, TX); San Angelo, TX

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Roping

Photography by Michael Anglin (San Angelo, TX); San Angelo, TX

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smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: In Hussaini Dalan
Photography by Hridoy Tanveer (Dhaka, Bangladesh); Hossaini Dalan, Bangladesh

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: In Hussaini Dalan

Photography by Hridoy Tanveer (Dhaka, Bangladesh); Hossaini Dalan, Bangladesh

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The National Women’s Law Center published this clickable map that allows you to see:
The share of minimum wage workers who are women
The next scheduled increase in the minimum wage
Any recent action on the minimum wage in the state legislature
It looks like my home state of North Dakota has an even split of men and women as minimum wage earners.
~Trent Gilliss, executive editor

The National Women’s Law Center published this clickable map that allows you to see:

  • The share of minimum wage workers who are women
  • The next scheduled increase in the minimum wage
  • Any recent action on the minimum wage in the state legislature

It looks like my home state of North Dakota has an even split of men and women as minimum wage earners.

~Trent Gilliss, executive editor

Comments

Each person is born with an unencumbered spot, free of expectation and regret, free of ambition and embarrassment, free of fear and worry; an umbilical spot of grace where we were each first touched by God. It is this spot of grace that issues peace. Psychologists call this spot the Psyche, Theologians call it the Soul, Jung calls it the Seat of the Unconscious, Hindu masters call it Atman, Buddhists call it Dharma, Rilke calls it Inwardness, Sufis call it Qalb, and Jesus calls it the Center of our Love.

To know this spot of Inwardness is to know who we are, not by surface markers of identity, not by where we work or what we wear or how we like to be addressed, but by feeling our place in relation to the Infinite and by inhabiting it. This is a hard lifelong task, for the nature of becoming is a constant filming over of where we begin, while the nature of being is a constant erosion of what is not essential. Each of us lives in the midst of this ongoing tension, growing tarnished or covered over, only to be worn back to that incorruptible spot of grace at our core.

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~Mark Nepo (from “Unlearning Back to God”)

Remembering this little bit of grace as I head into the weekend.

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