Prayers for Japan
A lovely post from Your Beautiful Mind worth reblogging:
Thousands of wooden prayer tablets, ema, hang outside Meiji Jingu, a  Shinto shrine. Japanese are not normally religious, but during times of  crisis they often revert back to traditional beliefs. Prayers for  disaster victims and the nuclear crisis are written and hung around a  divine tree. In a special ceremony, Shinto priests burn the prayers as  an offering.
Thousands of prayer tablets hung in one day testify that the crisis  in Japan continues to grow and people are trying to find ways to cope.  The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear site has been rated a five on a  seven-point international scale for atomic incidents, just two levels  lower than the Ukraine’s 1986 Chernobyl disaster. The head of the UN’s  nuclear watchdog warns that stabilizing the plant is a race against  time. In Japan’s disaster-ravaged northeast, 6,405 people are confirmed  dead and about 10,200 are listed missing.
While most Westerners often are preoccupied with causes of disaster —  the questions of why God would allow an earthquake, for example —  Eastern traditions like Buddhism and Shinto focus on behavior in  reaction to tragedy. It is very important in Japanese life to react in a  positive way, to be persistent and to clean up in the face of  adversity.

(image and text source here)
shared by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Prayers for Japan

A lovely post from Your Beautiful Mind worth reblogging:

Thousands of wooden prayer tablets, ema, hang outside Meiji Jingu, a Shinto shrine. Japanese are not normally religious, but during times of crisis they often revert back to traditional beliefs. Prayers for disaster victims and the nuclear crisis are written and hung around a divine tree. In a special ceremony, Shinto priests burn the prayers as an offering.

Thousands of prayer tablets hung in one day testify that the crisis in Japan continues to grow and people are trying to find ways to cope. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear site has been rated a five on a seven-point international scale for atomic incidents, just two levels lower than the Ukraine’s 1986 Chernobyl disaster. The head of the UN’s nuclear watchdog warns that stabilizing the plant is a race against time. In Japan’s disaster-ravaged northeast, 6,405 people are confirmed dead and about 10,200 are listed missing.

While most Westerners often are preoccupied with causes of disaster — the questions of why God would allow an earthquake, for example — Eastern traditions like Buddhism and Shinto focus on behavior in reaction to tragedy. It is very important in Japanese life to react in a positive way, to be persistent and to clean up in the face of adversity.

(image and text source here)

shared by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments powered by Disqus
  1. lalilster reblogged this from exiledsoul
  2. exiledsoul reblogged this from beingblog
  3. cleverclover1127 reblogged this from beingblog
  4. soloproject reblogged this from redmaryjane
  5. redmaryjane reblogged this from beingblog
  6. beingblog reblogged this from yourbeautifulmind and added:
    A lovely post from Your Beautiful Mind worth reblogging:...shared by Trent Gilliss, senior...
  7. existingreality reblogged this from yourbeautifulmind
  8. universeprotector reblogged this from yourbeautifulmind
  9. yourbeautifulmind posted this