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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Hablando de fe con Krista Tippett

Colleen Scheck, Producer

About five months ago, we received an e-mail from the deputy editor of a small Spanish magazine, El Ciervo, admiring our work and requesting permission to translate and print some of our interviews. The editor described El Ciervo as a magazine similar to the U.S. Catholic journal Commonweal, but a little “less churchy.”

Krista an Jean Vanier in El Ciervo

After working through the standard permissions issues with our legal department, and utilizing the Spanish proofing skills of our Minnesota Public Radio colleague Elizabeth Baier, we were excited to receive their September/October issue that includes the first translation in the “Conversaciones” section (unfortunately, not published online). They selected our program with Jean Vanier, and here’s an example of the Spanish and English of one of my favorite passages from that program:

Mi experiencia hoy es el descubrimiento de lo vulnerable que es Dios. Dios es tan respetuoso con nuestra libertad. En el evangelio de Juan se dice que Dios es amor, y cualquiera que haya amado en su vida sabe cómo se vuelve vulnerable. ¿Dónde estás tú y la otra persona, y me querrá igual que yo? Así que si Dios es amor, significa que es terriblemente vulnerable. Dios no quiere entrar en una relación en la que Él o Ella nos obliga a hacer algo. Hay un texto muy hermoso en el Apocalipsis, el Libro de las Revelaciones: ‘Estoy ante la puerta y llamo. Si alguien me oye y abre, entraré’. Lo que me conmueve es Dios que llama a la puerta, no tira la puerta abajo, sino que espera. ¿Abrirías? ¿Me oyes? Vivimos en un mundo donde hay tantas cosas en nuestras cabezas y corazones, tanta ansiedad y proyectos, que no oímos a Dios que llama a la puerta. Lo que me emociona más, quizá porque me vuelvo más vulnerable, es descubrir la vulnerabilidad de Dios, que no obliga.

My experience today is much more the discovery of how vulnerable God is. You see, God is so respectful of our freedom. And if, as the Epistle of John says, that God is love, anyone who has loved in their life knows they’ve become vulnerable. Where are you and the other person and do you love me back? So if God is love, it means that God is terribly vulnerable. And God doesn’t want to enter into a relationship where He’s obliging or She is obliging us to do something. The beautiful text in the Apocalypse, the Book of Revelations: “I stand at the door and I knock. If somebody hears me and opens the door, then I will enter.” What touches me there is God knocking at the door, not kicking the door down, but waiting. Do you, will you open? Do you hear me? Because we’re in a world where there’s so much going on in our heads and our hearts and anxiety and projects that we don’t hear God knocking at the door of our hearts. So I’d say that what touches me the deepest, maybe because I’m becoming myself more vulnerable, is the discovery of the vulnerability of God, who doesn’t oblige.

El Ciervo’s indicated an interest in publishing more translations, including possibly our programs with John Polkinghorne, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Joan Chittister. Espero que sí (I hope so).

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Touching Soles

Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

A newborn's foot. (photo: Shelley Gilliss)One of the most difficult aspects of working at Minnesota Public Radio is that I often don’t get a chance to listen to public radio on the weekdays, especially during working hours. Thanks to a new baby boy, I was actually able to listen to a documentary on Alzheimer’s disease by a colleague and former producer at SOF, Brian Newhouse.

It’s a wonderfully crafted piece that’s full of facts and figures and scientific experts discussing the problems and approaches to treating and curing the disease. But, the part that sang to me, is a follow-up interview with a man in his 40s who describes the way he communicates with his wife now that he is home-bound:

"In essence, she’s sort of lost that engaging partner that she used to have. But what we do do is we will, you know, I’ll have her lay on the couch, and I’ll rub her feet and so we communicate a lot through touch now. So there, there are moments of grace, and there are, there are gifts in, within Alzheimer’s that, that you have to, you don’t want to leave those behind as you’re struggling with some of the darker realities of the disease."

His sentiment transported me down the whooshing tunnel to a story Parker Palmer told to Krista in our show on depression:

"There was this one friend who came to me, after asking permission to do so, every afternoon about four o’clock, sat me down in a chair in the living room, took off my shoes and socks and massaged my feet. He hardly ever said anything. He was a Quaker elder. And yet out of his intuitive sense, from time to time would say a very brief word like, ‘I can feel your struggle today,’ or farther down the road, ‘I feel that you’re a little stronger at this moment, and I’m glad for that.’ But beyond that, he would say hardly anything. He would give no advice. He would simply report from time to time what he was sort of intuiting about my condition. Somehow he found the one place in my body, namely the soles of my feet, where I could experience some sort of connection to another human being. And the act of massaging just, you know, in a way that I really don’t have words for, kept me connected with the human race.

What he mainly did for me, of course, was to be willing to be present to me in my suffering. He just hung in with me in this very quiet, very simple, very tactile way. And I’ve never really been able to find the words to fully express my gratitude for that, but I know it made a huge difference. And it became for me a metaphor of the kind of community we need to extend to people who are suffering in this way, which is a community that is neither invasive of the mystery nor evasive of the suffering but is willing to hold people in a space, a sacred space of relationship, where somehow this person who is on the dark side of the moon can get a little confidence that they can come around to the other side.”

In an upcoming show for December 20th, Jean Vanier, the founder of L’Arche, echoes the idea that physicality is more than just a manner of expressing emotion. It’s a way of connecting with other humans and fostering compassion and kindness within ourselves.

Now, as a father of two boys under the age of two, these stories help me recognize what I know is vital in my relationship with them, especially a 2-year-old. When Lucian is frustrated and all my other methods of diversion (i.e., talking about Curious George, showing him the moon, kissing his belly…) have failed, a simple gesture of kissing his feet or gobbling his toes makes him laugh or even coo. We begin again.

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Producing Jean VanierKate Moos, Managing ProducerEvery new show is the product of lots of research, editing, writing, and scrutiny. One of the big bench marks is the listen to the first mix, where we assess the program and often make significant changes. Here Senior Producer Mitch Hanley and Krista give their best ear to the Jean Vanier show scheduled for Christmas week, in a listen conducted earlier today. In the interview, the founder of L’Arche—a movement composed of people who live in community as “assistants” to people with disabilities— describes his personal theology and the need to embrace tenderness as a powerful religious virtue. Jean Vanier speaks with a quiet authority that is absolutely stunning. We are very excited about the program.
Producing Jean VanierKate Moos, Managing ProducerEvery new show is the product of lots of research, editing, writing, and scrutiny. One of the big bench marks is the listen to the first mix, where we assess the program and often make significant changes. Here Senior Producer Mitch Hanley and Krista give their best ear to the Jean Vanier show scheduled for Christmas week, in a listen conducted earlier today. In the interview, the founder of L’Arche—a movement composed of people who live in community as “assistants” to people with disabilities— describes his personal theology and the need to embrace tenderness as a powerful religious virtue. Jean Vanier speaks with a quiet authority that is absolutely stunning. We are very excited about the program.
Producing Jean VanierKate Moos, Managing ProducerEvery new show is the product of lots of research, editing, writing, and scrutiny. One of the big bench marks is the listen to the first mix, where we assess the program and often make significant changes. Here Senior Producer Mitch Hanley and Krista give their best ear to the Jean Vanier show scheduled for Christmas week, in a listen conducted earlier today. In the interview, the founder of L’Arche—a movement composed of people who live in community as “assistants” to people with disabilities— describes his personal theology and the need to embrace tenderness as a powerful religious virtue. Jean Vanier speaks with a quiet authority that is absolutely stunning. We are very excited about the program.

Producing Jean Vanier
Kate Moos, Managing Producer

Every new show is the product of lots of research, editing, writing, and scrutiny. One of the big bench marks is the listen to the first mix, where we assess the program and often make significant changes. Here Senior Producer Mitch Hanley and Krista give their best ear to the Jean Vanier show scheduled for Christmas week, in a listen conducted earlier today. In the interview, the founder of L’Arche—a movement composed of people who live in community as “assistants” to people with disabilities— describes his personal theology and the need to embrace tenderness as a powerful religious virtue. Jean Vanier speaks with a quiet authority that is absolutely stunning. We are very excited about the program.

Comments