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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

If you have two illustrious graphic designers from Pentagram visit Minneapolis, where do you take them if you have an hour to spare? Jean Nouvel’s magnificently designed Guthrie Theater, for one.
And, of course, it was closed for January. Doh! It was a pleasure having Elliott Walker and Emily Oberman visit and work with us in our new offices for a couple of days. Good things are coming!
Where would you have toured?
(via trentgilliss)

If you have two illustrious graphic designers from Pentagram visit Minneapolis, where do you take them if you have an hour to spare? Jean Nouvel’s magnificently designed Guthrie Theater, for one.

And, of course, it was closed for January. Doh! It was a pleasure having Elliott Walker and Emily Oberman visit and work with us in our new offices for a couple of days. Good things are coming!

Where would you have toured?

(via trentgilliss)

Comments
trentgilliss:

Hired two new staff members this week: Mariah (right) and Mary Sue (left) who took a few moments at the end of the day today to admire the Basilica’s bells and the wedding party well-wishers. A really lovely moment at @onbeing.

trentgilliss:

Hired two new staff members this week: Mariah (right) and Mary Sue (left) who took a few moments at the end of the day today to admire the Basilica’s bells and the wedding party well-wishers. A really lovely moment at @onbeing.

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Got broken into last Saturday. First, they tried to pry open the front door; then they found their way in through the back…
As far as we know, only a laptop was stolen, but it’s not my favorite way to be spending a holiday evening with my family. Nevertheless my lovely wife helped me clean it up and our landlord came immediately with a new piece of glass.
There’s a lot to be thankful for. And now we have an upgraded security system that I hope will put our staff’s mind a bit better at ease.

Got broken into last Saturday. First, they tried to pry open the front door; then they found their way in through the back…

As far as we know, only a laptop was stolen, but it’s not my favorite way to be spending a holiday evening with my family. Nevertheless my lovely wife helped me clean it up and our landlord came immediately with a new piece of glass.

There’s a lot to be thankful for. And now we have an upgraded security system that I hope will put our staff’s mind a bit better at ease.

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A woodworker installs Doug fir frames in On Being’s new sound studio. Next pieces are car glass canted at off angles. Yay!
(via trentgilliss)

A woodworker installs Doug fir frames in On Being’s new sound studio. Next pieces are car glass canted at off angles. Yay!

(via trentgilliss)

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Wally is the electrician who has wired every square inch of On Being’s new offices on Loring Park. He’s always upbeat, never kvetches, and has a can-do attitude. Take this photo, for example. Here he is on a lift 17 feet in the air changing the location of an electrical box for the third time. (The HVAC installer ran his duct work right over the top of where a pendant light is supposed to hang.) Not a word. Just a slight smile and he forges ahead.
(at On Being on Loring Park)
(via trentgilliss)

Wally is the electrician who has wired every square inch of On Being’s new offices on Loring Park. He’s always upbeat, never kvetches, and has a can-do attitude. Take this photo, for example. Here he is on a lift 17 feet in the air changing the location of an electrical box for the third time. (The HVAC installer ran his duct work right over the top of where a pendant light is supposed to hang.) Not a word. Just a slight smile and he forges ahead.

(at On Being on Loring Park)

(via trentgilliss)

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We’ve got glass! It may not look like much, but it is a major stride. (at On Being on Loring Park)
(via trentgilliss)

We’ve got glass! It may not look like much, but it is a major stride. (at On Being on Loring Park)

(via trentgilliss)

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trentgilliss:

We’ve got wood on the mezzanine. Through the door is @kristatippett land. Lots of good things going down. (at On Being on Loring Park)

trentgilliss:

We’ve got wood on the mezzanine. Through the door is @kristatippett land. Lots of good things going down. (at On Being on Loring Park)

Comments
The studio is in motion. Things are being built. This is all becoming very concrete and very real. On Being will be recording and editing from our new digs in Loring Park in October, for sure.
(via trentgilliss)

The studio is in motion. Things are being built. This is all becoming very concrete and very real. On Being will be recording and editing from our new digs in Loring Park in October, for sure.

(via trentgilliss)

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From our CCO trentgilliss:

Morning street scene from Minneapolis. (at Basilica of Saint Mary)

From our CCO trentgilliss:

Morning street scene from Minneapolis. (at Basilica of Saint Mary)

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Hey, check out this 3D rendering of the storefront of our new office on Hennepin Ave in Minneapolis. The building is located near Loring Park, which is the religious and cultural hub of the city — with the Basilica of St. Mary directly across the street, the Walker Art Center and Sculpture Garden a block away, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, and Minneapolis Community & Technical College just up the street.
The space pictured in the image above will be an intimate live events space. We can seat 25-60 (I prefer to keep it below 25) and we plan on having Krista Tippett (our host) conduct interviews next to the 17-foot library wall. But, we also hope to make it available for the community to hold informal salons and cultural exchanges that deepen our connection with the community. It’s a place of exchange and reciprocity, in which we as journalists and the media get a chance to learn and remember why we’re in this profession.
Here are two more renderings from different perspectives. From the front of the house looking into the space, you can see our studio with the herringbone pattern wrapped in Douglas fir:

And, from the back of the space looking toward Hennepin Avenue:


~Trent Gilliss, chief content officer

Hey, check out this 3D rendering of the storefront of our new office on Hennepin Ave in Minneapolis. The building is located near Loring Park, which is the religious and cultural hub of the city — with the Basilica of St. Mary directly across the street, the Walker Art Center and Sculpture Garden a block away, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, and Minneapolis Community & Technical College just up the street.

The space pictured in the image above will be an intimate live events space. We can seat 25-60 (I prefer to keep it below 25) and we plan on having Krista Tippett (our host) conduct interviews next to the 17-foot library wall. But, we also hope to make it available for the community to hold informal salons and cultural exchanges that deepen our connection with the community. It’s a place of exchange and reciprocity, in which we as journalists and the media get a chance to learn and remember why we’re in this profession.

Here are two more renderings from different perspectives. From the front of the house looking into the space, you can see our studio with the herringbone pattern wrapped in Douglas fir:

20130820_Design Perspectives_with KTPP comments_Page_2

And, from the back of the space looking toward Hennepin Avenue:

20130820_Design Perspectives_with KTPP comments_Page_1

~Trent Gilliss, chief content officer

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Brother Ali and A Day of Dignity in North Minneapolis

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Twin Cities Day of Dignity posterThe hip-hop artist Brother Ali's lyrics are infused with notions of community, family, and serving one another. And, today in the blocks surrounding his mosque in North Minneapolis, Masjid An-Nur, he is putting on this cool community get-together and outreach effort, which they're calling the Twin Cities Day of Dignity: A Celebration of Neighbors Helping Neighbors.

The north side, one of the poorest and most crime-ridden areas of the city, was devastated by a tornado in May of this year. The natural disaster left the neighborhood in tatters, but the community also united in the clean-up effort. To celebrate, they’ll be closing down the streets and offering free health care services and medical supplies, haircuts, winter clothing, food, and school supplies to people and families in need. And, to round out the day’s celebration, a free performance by Freeway and Brother Ali:

"But this event has a particularly special place in my heart because it’s in my particular space in the community, but then it’s also such a service to humanity. It’s not just a show. All different parts of the Twin Cities community get to come together to actually help people, help people in need, and to be a part of that, to be able to have this music here to celebrate the cultural side of it as well. It’s a beautiful thing."
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Gary Snyder Gave Me Goose Bumps

by Kate Moos, executive producer

Gary Snyder Signs a Book at Plymouth Congregational(phto: Kate Moos)

Gary Snyder, at 81, strong-voiced and vital, gave a reading in Minneapolis last night at Plymouth Congregational Church, part of their Literary Witness Program.

Snyder is often characterized as one of the Beats, but his habits of exploration and inquiry led him to a different experience and a different poetry than we associate with Kerouac and Ginsberg. Early, he became a student of Asian literature and Buddhism. His pioneering devotion to the environment and the idea of wildness in the American West has made him an icon for generations of poets, Buddhist aspirants, and defenders of the natural world.

Gary Snyder Speaks to a Rapt Audience at Plymouth Congregational Church in Minneapolis

He read his old poems, including his translations of Han-Shan, the famous Cold Mountain poems. He also read poems that are not yet in print — a generous gesture from a senior figure of his stature.

When I first read the Cold Mountain poems years ago, this stanza got stuck in my brain. I don’t know why.

It’s a kind of explanation of everything for me, and I’ve been reciting it to myself inwardly for the better part of my life. Hearing him read it aloud in person last night gave me goose bumps.

When men see Han-shan
They all say he’s crazy
And not much to look at —
Dressed in rags and hides.
They don’t get what I say
And I don’t talk their language.
All I can say to those I meet:
"Try and make it to Cold Mountain."

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The Enchantment of Minnehaha Falls

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Enchantment of Minnehaha Falls
(photo: ©Al Gage)

A long, prosperous winter is coming to pass. The spring thaw is upon us in Minnesota. And, it feels so necessary. But, it’s not without some remorse, especially when taking in the shocking beauty of Minnehaha Falls captured in such exquisite light. The creek is now assuming its dutiful labor, the water wresting and freeing itself from its dormant state.

A big thanks to Al Gage for capturing this bit of nature!

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How Did You Become a Unitarian Universalist?
Nancy Rosenbaum, associate producer

Following up on last week’s video post, here’s a 3½-minute video snack where a mix of UUs explain how they came to this tradition. Listening to these voices, it’s clear that each person’s journey is unique and doesn’t necessarily follow a linear path. Some arrived through predictable channels — friends, marriage, family — while others had more surprising stories — and why they decided to stay.

Later this week we’ll be posting a longer-form piece that caps this video series of interviews from the Unitarian Universalist 2010 General Assembly. And, next week, a video showcasing a sped-up procession of beautiful quilted banners for the opening day festivities!

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Matisyahu at First Ave
Mitch Hanley, Senior Producer

Last night, Nancy Rosenbaum, our new associate producer, and I went to see Matisyahu perform at First Avenue, Minneapolis’ storied nightclub that was the setting for Prince’s Purple Rain 25 years ago. Matisyahu is a Lubavitch Hasidic Jew who raps about traditional Judaism over fantastic, syncopated reggae beats. I’ve been following his Twitter feed (@matisyahu) and was able to score a pair of free tickets by the Twitter version of “being the 10th caller.”

Recently, I’ve been enjoying reading Emory University professor Gary Laderman's new book, Sacred Matters, in which he suggests that the streams of popular culture are now and have been serving as sources of religious expression for many Americans. The ideas of pilgrimage, ritual, devotion, transcendence, gathering of community, the betterment of one’s self — all of these can be seen expressed at movie theaters, concerts, sporting events, etc.

With this fresh in my mind, I couldn’t help but notice last night’s show in that context. After the opening act, I turned to a couple on my right and asked them how many times they had seen Matisyahu perform. It was the first time for the guy, but his fiance had seen him three other times: Indianapolis (where she was living at the time), Atlanta, and Chicago. She freely admitted that she flew to Atlanta just to see his concert. “Haven’t you ever done that before?” she asked. (Actually yes, Luis Miguel and Julio Iglesias on two different nights in Miami, but this was for my wife, honest.)

I explained (shouting, the show had begun by now) Laderman’s premise and asked the woman if she had considered her attendances as “pilgrimages” or as expressions of devotion. She replied quite sincerely, “No, this is purely entertainment. I am a devoted Christian and my experience of enjoying this as entertainment is nothing like when I am worshipping Christ.” We both agreed that, for some in the crowd on the dance floor, this was serving as a religious expression, though that is probably not how they might describe it.

As I watched the rest of the concert, the arms raised and lowered with the beat, the lighters lifted up during the quieter passages, the refrains chanted when the singer’s mic was outstretched to the devoted. There was certainly a liturgy here, even if these are just things you do at a good concert.

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