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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
The rush and pressure of modern life are a form, perhaps the most common form, of its innate violence. To allow oneself to be carried away by a multitude of conflicting concerns, to surrender to too many demands, to commit oneself to too many projects, to want to help everyone in everything is to succumb to violence. More than that, it is cooperation in violence. The frenzy of the activist…destroys his own inner capacity for peace. It destroys the fruitfulness of his own work, because it kills the root of inner wisdom which makes work fruitful.
- Thomas Merton, as quoted in Courtney Martin’s weekly column for On Being, "The Spiritual Art of Saying No"
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I can’t do everything, but today I can ___________ .
- Fill in this blank + reblog with your answer. Then pose the challenge to your followers.
Tagged: #On Being
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You might know Dan Barber best as the chef of Blue Hill in NYC. But, behind the kitchen maestro, is a big thinker who really gives the farm-to-table movement a whole new meaning. Well worth listening to… especially for the story about the mokkum carrot!

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Received this image and lovely comment from Laurie Haycraft in response to Parker Palmer’s reflection on being lost in the wilds of your life:

"I had made some stepping stones with this poem stamped into them for our cabin and placed them on a trail leading into the forest. We had some grading work done around the cabin and one of the stones, unbeknownst to me, got buried. When I went to dig up the stones the next year to create a new path, I discovered that the last stone was missing, irretrievably ‘lost’ in the woods. I know I could make a new stone with the final lines of the poem, but somehow it seems more apropos to leave it ‘lost,’ the forest knows where it is and in a way, so do I."
Received this image and lovely comment from Laurie Haycraft in response to Parker Palmer’s reflection on being lost in the wilds of your life:

"I had made some stepping stones with this poem stamped into them for our cabin and placed them on a trail leading into the forest. We had some grading work done around the cabin and one of the stones, unbeknownst to me, got buried. When I went to dig up the stones the next year to create a new path, I discovered that the last stone was missing, irretrievably ‘lost’ in the woods. I know I could make a new stone with the final lines of the poem, but somehow it seems more apropos to leave it ‘lost,’ the forest knows where it is and in a way, so do I."

Received this image and lovely comment from Laurie Haycraft in response to Parker Palmer’s reflection on being lost in the wilds of your life:

"I had made some stepping stones with this poem stamped into them for our cabin and placed them on a trail leading into the forest. We had some grading work done around the cabin and one of the stones, unbeknownst to me, got buried. When I went to dig up the stones the next year to create a new path, I discovered that the last stone was missing, irretrievably ‘lost’ in the woods. I know I could make a new stone with the final lines of the poem, but somehow it seems more apropos to leave it ‘lost,’ the forest knows where it is and in a way, so do I."

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Now we have half-stepped away from our long centuries of despoilment, promising, ‘Never again.’ But still we are haunted. It is as though we have run up a credit-card bill and, having pledged to charge no more, remain befuddled that the balance does not disappear. The effects of that balance, interest accruing daily, are all around us.
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In one way or another, every wisdom tradition I know says that what we need is here. It’s just a matter of opening our eyes and appreciating what I call ‘secrets hidden in plain sight.’ But we can’t do that when we’re obsessing about the past or the future, or about what we don’t have, or allowing a thousand distractions to prevent us from noticing the gift of ‘here and now.’
- Parker Palmer, from "What We Need Is Here"
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Ashwini Ramaswamy of Ragamala Dance performs “Sacred Earth” at On Being on Loring Park during the Northern Spark festival.
Ashwini Ramaswamy of Ragamala Dance performs “Sacred Earth” at On Being on Loring Park during the Northern Spark festival.

Ashwini Ramaswamy of Ragamala Dance performs “Sacred Earth” at On Being on Loring Park during the Northern Spark festival.

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What might words like repentance or forgiveness mean, culturally, in this moment? These are questions of the emerging church, a loosely-defined movement that crosses generations, theologies and social ideologies in the hope of reimagining Christianity. With Phyllis Tickle and Vincent Harding, we bring you an honest (and sometimes politically incorrect) conversation on coming to terms with racial identity in the church and in the world:

"The great American experiment with building a multiracial democracy is still in the laboratory. We have got to be willing to see ourselves as part of an experiment that is actively working its way through right now. We stumble. We hold on to each other. We hug each other. We fight with one another in loving ways. But we keep moving and experimenting and trying to figure it out."
"There’s a difference between repentance and forgiveness and there’s a difference between those in grace. And if we do this thing that Vincent’s talking about, if we refashion this country — which we’re going to do — but if we do it without grace, it will be just as clunky and just as unfortunate. And just as many people will get the short end of the stick as has been true in the past."

Visit the website »

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Sketchnotes of On Being interview with wildlife conservationist Alan Rabinowitz. 
Sketchnotes of On Being interview with wildlife conservationist Alan Rabinowitz. 
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Do the Heagle.
Our technical director Chris Heagle does a lot of dancing in the minutes before the interview when the host and guest take their seats. Mic positioning, sound checks, water ready… just a few of the things our resident expert makes perfect in a quiet, frenzied pace before Krista Tippett sat down with poet Marie Howe at the College of Saint Benedict.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Do the Heagle.
Our technical director Chris Heagle does a lot of dancing in the minutes before the interview when the host and guest take their seats. Mic positioning, sound checks, water ready… just a few of the things our resident expert makes perfect in a quiet, frenzied pace before Krista Tippett sat down with poet Marie Howe at the College of Saint Benedict.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Do the Heagle.

Our technical director Chris Heagle does a lot of dancing in the minutes before the interview when the host and guest take their seats. Mic positioning, sound checks, water ready… just a few of the things our resident expert makes perfect in a quiet, frenzied pace before Krista Tippett sat down with poet Marie Howe at the College of Saint Benedict.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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A Bittersweet Picture
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
This week we bid a fond farewell to our executive producer Kate Moos (house left, as they say, in the photo above). After more than eight years on the show, she is moving on to greener pastures. She’s not leaving us officially until the end of the calendar year, but as we cross 2012’s threshold, she’ll be starting a new project for American Public Media (our parent company) that will tap in to the organization’s Public Insight Network to deliver news stories on a variety of platforms, which are sourced from deep within the communities that surround us.
Big opportunity. Big project. Big ideas. And a big mind to handle it all. She’ll be missed, but she’ll still be just down the hall. Farewell, Kate Moos!
(Photo: Instagram by Trent Gilliss)
A Bittersweet Picture
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
This week we bid a fond farewell to our executive producer Kate Moos (house left, as they say, in the photo above). After more than eight years on the show, she is moving on to greener pastures. She’s not leaving us officially until the end of the calendar year, but as we cross 2012’s threshold, she’ll be starting a new project for American Public Media (our parent company) that will tap in to the organization’s Public Insight Network to deliver news stories on a variety of platforms, which are sourced from deep within the communities that surround us.
Big opportunity. Big project. Big ideas. And a big mind to handle it all. She’ll be missed, but she’ll still be just down the hall. Farewell, Kate Moos!
(Photo: Instagram by Trent Gilliss)

A Bittersweet Picture

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

This week we bid a fond farewell to our executive producer Kate Moos (house left, as they say, in the photo above). After more than eight years on the show, she is moving on to greener pastures. She’s not leaving us officially until the end of the calendar year, but as we cross 2012’s threshold, she’ll be starting a new project for American Public Media (our parent company) that will tap in to the organization’s Public Insight Network to deliver news stories on a variety of platforms, which are sourced from deep within the communities that surround us.

Big opportunity. Big project. Big ideas. And a big mind to handle it all. She’ll be missed, but she’ll still be just down the hall. Farewell, Kate Moos!

(Photo: Instagram by Trent Gilliss)

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Anonymous asked:
how can I listen to On Being on my Kindle Fire??

Good morning, Anonymous—

Listening to On Being on the Kindle FireI’m going to do a partial punt on this one because none of us on staff have a Kindle Fire, and thus do not have an intimate knowledge of the device that might offer you specific steps. That said, we do offer each weekly show and unedited interview via podcast or as individual downloads on each episode’s show page at the On Being website. I’ll defer to our readers and Tumblr dashboard audience to offer better advice on apps that might make this experience easier.

I am one of those cats who uses Amazon’s Cloud service. A lot. Perhaps I can offer a possible workaround in which you download the mp3 to your device and then sync it to your Amazon Cloud account. That way you can use the native music player to stream your favorite On Being episodes without having to hound-dog them on your device!

When you find a solution, please let me know what works best. We’re starting to receive a number of questions about Kindles and I’d like to be able to share your solutions with others.

Happy holidays,
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Anonymous asked:
what are on being showtimes on WGBH

Good morning, Anon—

WGBH airs our shows at 7 a.m. on Sunday mornings in Boston and surrounding communities. And, if you’re an early riser, WBUR also carries our program, broadcasting it at 6 a.m. on Sundays.

Hope this answers your question,
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Anonymous asked:
Who is behind yourorganization

Good morning, Anonymous—

On Being is a public radio project hosted and produced by Krista Tippett, with a production staff of five including me, Chris Heagle, Nancy Rosenbaum, Susan Leem, and Anne Breckbill. The program is produced and distributed by American Public Media, which also distributes such popular shows as The Splendid Table, A Prairie Home Companion, Marketplace, and many more. We’re based out of St. Paul, Minnesota.

Happy Thanksgiving!
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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The Unorthodox Spectrum of Mormonism Explained

by Krista Tippett, host

I’ve had a sense of déjà vu as the discussion about Mormonism has heated up as of late, with exactly the same dynamic occurring in the last presidential election season. But the discussion this time is more serious.

It’s not just the fact that two Mormons — Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman — are viable presidential candidates. It’s a Broadway musical. It’s more than one successful TV drama. We’re in, we’re coming to say, a “Mormon moment.” Joanna Brooks, giving just one of the many helpful pieces of perspective in this conversation, compares the rise of Mormons in politics and culture to the rise of the Mormon-owned Marriott Hotel chain. A highly disciplined, highly effective frontier culture grows up and migrates back out into centers of power. It’s a classic American story. But there’s also some kind of religious and cultural coming of age here, for Mormons and the rest of us.

I couldn’t have found a better person than Joanna Brooks to shed some distinctively informative, candid, and meaningful light on it all. She’s a literature scholar and a journalist. Her Ask Mormon Girl blog and Twitter feed is a remarkably reflective, compassionate community of questioning with Mormons of many stripes. Joanna BrooksAnd Ask Mormon Girl, as she notes on her website, is housed on the “legendary Feminist Mormon Housewives blog.” That is just one of many things that does not meet the traditional American eye on the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — but which we engage through the voice and life of Joanna Brooks.

She grew up, as she tells it for starters, at the southern tip of the “Book of Mormon Belt” — Orange County, California, that is, which I’d associated more vividly with evangelical Christianity. Her father was “bishop” of their congregation several times growing up — a volunteer position that Mitt Romney has also held in his communities across his lifetime. Her mother is a “professional Mormon,” as she affectionately puts it — with, among other things, a serious avocation for genealogy. Joanna Brooks uses words like “rich,” “imaginative”, and “robust” to describe this faith that formed her and that she continues to love.

She has also struggled mightily, suffered disappointment and heartbreak, with this tradition she loves. She became an intellectual and a feminist at Brigham Young University, and then watched the university and the Church for a time condemn and disown the very Mormon mentors who’d inspired her. She was vociferously opposed to the proactive role the LDS Church took in California’s Proposition 8 referendum. But she is a probing force inside the Church’s wrestling with pain and confusion over this issue. Her blog is a model of compassionate presence, both to LGBT Mormons and to parents struggling to reconcile their religious beliefs and their love for their children. She honors the human confusion here that is not exclusive to Mormons and the added complexity that their theology of the family and eternity gives to subjects of marriage and sexuality.

Most of this conversation, though, is not about hot-button issues or presidential politics. It is an informative, energetic, and often moving journey into life on the other side of the American perception that Mormons are weird at best, a cult at worst. Joanna Brooks does not defend her tradition in any simplistic way, but she does make it three-dimensional and far harder to parody. Consider, for example, as she helps us do, the ambivalence and pain that Mormon married couples feel at their church’s legacy of polygamy. Hear her explanation of her sense of the “strangeness” of accusations she’s heard since she was a child, that she — a follower of Jesus Christ, a serious thinker about notions like atonement and grace — is not Christian. On a lighter note, but with just as much illumination for the listener, she is candid and corrective about a lingering obsession out there with ritual Mormon undergarments.

The most classic American story in this Mormon moment, perhaps, is how Joanna Brooks and other faith-filled and “unorthodox” Mormons are claiming their place in the unfolding story of this young frontier tradition. It is evolving from the inside in ways more meaningful, perhaps, than its outer rise to prominence in politics. Maybe in hindsight, we’ll see this Mormon moment as an occasion for this increasingly influential American phenomenon, composed after all of human beings, to become more articulate about itself and more comprehensible to the rest of us in its complexity.

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