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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
"I haven’t attended Mass in years, but I blessed it with the sign of the cross, a comforting remnant from my Catholic childhood. Making the strokes with my thumb is my way of saying: your life mattered. Your contributions were generous. You will be missed. And during absolute heartbreak, I celebrated a moment of exquisite pain: I am still alive. I can make a difference in the name of this tree. I must."
~Marianne Griebler, from "A Requiem for Trees"
Photo by Norma Desmond
"I haven’t attended Mass in years, but I blessed it with the sign of the cross, a comforting remnant from my Catholic childhood. Making the strokes with my thumb is my way of saying: your life mattered. Your contributions were generous. You will be missed. And during absolute heartbreak, I celebrated a moment of exquisite pain: I am still alive. I can make a difference in the name of this tree. I must."
~Marianne Griebler, from "A Requiem for Trees"
Photo by Norma Desmond

"I haven’t attended Mass in years, but I blessed it with the sign of the cross, a comforting remnant from my Catholic childhood. Making the strokes with my thumb is my way of saying: your life mattered. Your contributions were generous. You will be missed. And during absolute heartbreak, I celebrated a moment of exquisite pain: I am still alive. I can make a difference in the name of this tree. I must."

~Marianne Griebler, from "A Requiem for Trees"

Photo by Norma Desmond

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Our latest podcast with Imani Perry (a scholar of law, culture, race— and hip hop) and the fabric of our identity is the first in a four-part series, “The American Consciousness.”

Ms. Perry acknowledges wise voices who say that we will never get to the promised land of racial equality, writing, “That may very well be true, but it also true that extraordinary things have happened and keep happening in our history. The question is, how do we prepare for and precipitate them?” We took her up on this emboldening question at the Chautauqua Institution, on the cusp of yet a new collective reckoning with the racial fabric of American life.

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When you are joyous, look deep into your heart and you shall find it is only that which has given you sorrow that is giving you joy.

When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight.

Some of you say, “Joy is greater thar sorrow,” and others say, “Nay, sorrow is the greater.” But I say unto you, they are inseparable.

- Kahlil Gibran, from “On Joy and Sorrow” as quoted in response to this magnificent post by Parker Palmer about creating a supple heart.
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The rush and pressure of modern life are a form, perhaps the most common form, of its innate violence. To allow oneself to be carried away by a multitude of conflicting concerns, to surrender to too many demands, to commit oneself to too many projects, to want to help everyone in everything is to succumb to violence. More than that, it is cooperation in violence. The frenzy of the activist…destroys his own inner capacity for peace. It destroys the fruitfulness of his own work, because it kills the root of inner wisdom which makes work fruitful.
- Thomas Merton, as quoted in Courtney Martin’s weekly column for On Being, "The Spiritual Art of Saying No"
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I can’t do everything, but today I can ___________ .
- Fill in this blank + reblog with your answer. Then pose the challenge to your followers.
Tagged: #On Being
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You might know Dan Barber best as the chef of Blue Hill in NYC. But, behind the kitchen maestro, is a big thinker who really gives the farm-to-table movement a whole new meaning. Well worth listening to… especially for the story about the mokkum carrot!

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Received this image and lovely comment from Laurie Haycraft in response to Parker Palmer’s reflection on being lost in the wilds of your life:

"I had made some stepping stones with this poem stamped into them for our cabin and placed them on a trail leading into the forest. We had some grading work done around the cabin and one of the stones, unbeknownst to me, got buried. When I went to dig up the stones the next year to create a new path, I discovered that the last stone was missing, irretrievably ‘lost’ in the woods. I know I could make a new stone with the final lines of the poem, but somehow it seems more apropos to leave it ‘lost,’ the forest knows where it is and in a way, so do I."
Received this image and lovely comment from Laurie Haycraft in response to Parker Palmer’s reflection on being lost in the wilds of your life:

"I had made some stepping stones with this poem stamped into them for our cabin and placed them on a trail leading into the forest. We had some grading work done around the cabin and one of the stones, unbeknownst to me, got buried. When I went to dig up the stones the next year to create a new path, I discovered that the last stone was missing, irretrievably ‘lost’ in the woods. I know I could make a new stone with the final lines of the poem, but somehow it seems more apropos to leave it ‘lost,’ the forest knows where it is and in a way, so do I."

Received this image and lovely comment from Laurie Haycraft in response to Parker Palmer’s reflection on being lost in the wilds of your life:

"I had made some stepping stones with this poem stamped into them for our cabin and placed them on a trail leading into the forest. We had some grading work done around the cabin and one of the stones, unbeknownst to me, got buried. When I went to dig up the stones the next year to create a new path, I discovered that the last stone was missing, irretrievably ‘lost’ in the woods. I know I could make a new stone with the final lines of the poem, but somehow it seems more apropos to leave it ‘lost,’ the forest knows where it is and in a way, so do I."

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Now we have half-stepped away from our long centuries of despoilment, promising, ‘Never again.’ But still we are haunted. It is as though we have run up a credit-card bill and, having pledged to charge no more, remain befuddled that the balance does not disappear. The effects of that balance, interest accruing daily, are all around us.
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In one way or another, every wisdom tradition I know says that what we need is here. It’s just a matter of opening our eyes and appreciating what I call ‘secrets hidden in plain sight.’ But we can’t do that when we’re obsessing about the past or the future, or about what we don’t have, or allowing a thousand distractions to prevent us from noticing the gift of ‘here and now.’
- Parker Palmer, from "What We Need Is Here"
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Ashwini Ramaswamy of Ragamala Dance performs “Sacred Earth” at On Being on Loring Park during the Northern Spark festival.
Ashwini Ramaswamy of Ragamala Dance performs “Sacred Earth” at On Being on Loring Park during the Northern Spark festival.

Ashwini Ramaswamy of Ragamala Dance performs “Sacred Earth” at On Being on Loring Park during the Northern Spark festival.

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What might words like repentance or forgiveness mean, culturally, in this moment? These are questions of the emerging church, a loosely-defined movement that crosses generations, theologies and social ideologies in the hope of reimagining Christianity. With Phyllis Tickle and Vincent Harding, we bring you an honest (and sometimes politically incorrect) conversation on coming to terms with racial identity in the church and in the world:

"The great American experiment with building a multiracial democracy is still in the laboratory. We have got to be willing to see ourselves as part of an experiment that is actively working its way through right now. We stumble. We hold on to each other. We hug each other. We fight with one another in loving ways. But we keep moving and experimenting and trying to figure it out."
"There’s a difference between repentance and forgiveness and there’s a difference between those in grace. And if we do this thing that Vincent’s talking about, if we refashion this country — which we’re going to do — but if we do it without grace, it will be just as clunky and just as unfortunate. And just as many people will get the short end of the stick as has been true in the past."

Visit the website »

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Sketchnotes of On Being interview with wildlife conservationist Alan Rabinowitz. 
Sketchnotes of On Being interview with wildlife conservationist Alan Rabinowitz. 
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Do the Heagle.
Our technical director Chris Heagle does a lot of dancing in the minutes before the interview when the host and guest take their seats. Mic positioning, sound checks, water ready… just a few of the things our resident expert makes perfect in a quiet, frenzied pace before Krista Tippett sat down with poet Marie Howe at the College of Saint Benedict.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Do the Heagle.
Our technical director Chris Heagle does a lot of dancing in the minutes before the interview when the host and guest take their seats. Mic positioning, sound checks, water ready… just a few of the things our resident expert makes perfect in a quiet, frenzied pace before Krista Tippett sat down with poet Marie Howe at the College of Saint Benedict.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Do the Heagle.

Our technical director Chris Heagle does a lot of dancing in the minutes before the interview when the host and guest take their seats. Mic positioning, sound checks, water ready… just a few of the things our resident expert makes perfect in a quiet, frenzied pace before Krista Tippett sat down with poet Marie Howe at the College of Saint Benedict.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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A Bittersweet Picture
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
This week we bid a fond farewell to our executive producer Kate Moos (house left, as they say, in the photo above). After more than eight years on the show, she is moving on to greener pastures. She’s not leaving us officially until the end of the calendar year, but as we cross 2012’s threshold, she’ll be starting a new project for American Public Media (our parent company) that will tap in to the organization’s Public Insight Network to deliver news stories on a variety of platforms, which are sourced from deep within the communities that surround us.
Big opportunity. Big project. Big ideas. And a big mind to handle it all. She’ll be missed, but she’ll still be just down the hall. Farewell, Kate Moos!
(Photo: Instagram by Trent Gilliss)
A Bittersweet Picture
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
This week we bid a fond farewell to our executive producer Kate Moos (house left, as they say, in the photo above). After more than eight years on the show, she is moving on to greener pastures. She’s not leaving us officially until the end of the calendar year, but as we cross 2012’s threshold, she’ll be starting a new project for American Public Media (our parent company) that will tap in to the organization’s Public Insight Network to deliver news stories on a variety of platforms, which are sourced from deep within the communities that surround us.
Big opportunity. Big project. Big ideas. And a big mind to handle it all. She’ll be missed, but she’ll still be just down the hall. Farewell, Kate Moos!
(Photo: Instagram by Trent Gilliss)

A Bittersweet Picture

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

This week we bid a fond farewell to our executive producer Kate Moos (house left, as they say, in the photo above). After more than eight years on the show, she is moving on to greener pastures. She’s not leaving us officially until the end of the calendar year, but as we cross 2012’s threshold, she’ll be starting a new project for American Public Media (our parent company) that will tap in to the organization’s Public Insight Network to deliver news stories on a variety of platforms, which are sourced from deep within the communities that surround us.

Big opportunity. Big project. Big ideas. And a big mind to handle it all. She’ll be missed, but she’ll still be just down the hall. Farewell, Kate Moos!

(Photo: Instagram by Trent Gilliss)

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Anonymous asked:
how can I listen to On Being on my Kindle Fire??

Good morning, Anonymous—

Listening to On Being on the Kindle FireI’m going to do a partial punt on this one because none of us on staff have a Kindle Fire, and thus do not have an intimate knowledge of the device that might offer you specific steps. That said, we do offer each weekly show and unedited interview via podcast or as individual downloads on each episode’s show page at the On Being website. I’ll defer to our readers and Tumblr dashboard audience to offer better advice on apps that might make this experience easier.

I am one of those cats who uses Amazon’s Cloud service. A lot. Perhaps I can offer a possible workaround in which you download the mp3 to your device and then sync it to your Amazon Cloud account. That way you can use the native music player to stream your favorite On Being episodes without having to hound-dog them on your device!

When you find a solution, please let me know what works best. We’re starting to receive a number of questions about Kindles and I’d like to be able to share your solutions with others.

Happy holidays,
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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