On Being Tumblr

On Being Tumblr

On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Irish Singing, Old School

by Mitch Hanley, senior producer

In production on next week’s homage to the late John O’Donohue, I have been researching Celtic music, attempting to not have a show full of jigs and reels, but to have a good cross-section of this genre. I came across this style of Gaelic singing, sean-nos, meaning “in the old style,” in a YouTube video of Iarla O’lionaird (fronts the band Afro Celt Sound System) singing in a pub.

Imagine yourself in a tucked away nook of Ireland, hearing this haunting, sad melody, carrying you back some thousands of years. It is just beautiful.

Also fun is trying to follow along with the words…

Curfá:
Bog braon, bog braon, bog braon don tseanduine,
bog braon, bog braon, bog braon don tseanduine.

Cuir a chodladh, cuir a chodladh, cuir a chodladh an seanduine,
cuir a chodladh is ní a chosa is bog deoch don tseanduine.

Curfá

Ubh chirce, ubh chirce, ubh chirce don tseanduine,
ubh chirce is blúire ime is a thabhairt don tseanduine.

Curfá

Feoil úr, feoil úr, feoil úr don tseanduine,
feoil úr is braon súp is a thabhairt don tseanduine.
Comments

National Cathedral to Dupont Circle Yoga to Princeton

Kate Moos, Managing Producer

Krista signs a book for one of her listeners.A fabulous turn-out yesterday at the National Cathedral. It looked like six or seven hundred people in the pews, filling the nave of the Cathedral for the Sunday Forum, during which Dean Sam Lloyd interviewed Krista — always a treat, I think, for the listeners to hear Krista’s take on the sorts of questions she puts to others. Keep an eye on the Cathedral’s site for video. (We’ll be getting a copy as well for possible posting here.) Also very nice to meet and work with our friends at WAMU on this visit, especially Andrea Travis, who really helped make it a fine event.

Krista speaks at the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.We made a quick turnaround and headed for a Bikram yoga studio in Dupont Circle… just the thing to wring out any remaining adrenalin and balance the energy after a big event!

My phone is not cooperating in attempts to send pics, so I’ll try to figure out what the problem is. Later today a train to Princeton for the final event on this trip. More soon!

Comments

Krista at the National Cathedral

Kate Moos, Managing ProducerNational Cathderal

National CathedralKrista and I head out tomorrow for D.C. where we have another event in our 2008 World Tour, at the National Cathedral’s Sunday Forum. Our travels are exciting, and by far and away the best thing about them is meeting our listeners. It’s just an amazing gift. The event is at 10 am Sunday February 3rd, and is free and open. See you there!

Comments
In the Lions’ Den Krista with Paul Holdengraber and Stuart Brown at the New York Public Library Kate Moos, Managing Producer Krista and I are back on the ground in frigid Minnesota. Last night a capacity crowd of nearly 250 people filled this lecture hall at the historic New York Public Library on 42nd Street in Manhattan. Krista and Stuart (of the National Institute for Play) were elegantly and playfully interviewed by Paul, who is the host of the NYPL’s ongoing LIVE series. The topic, approximately, was: how does the life of the spirit relate to the human capacity and need for play? And, Krista then signed the new paperback edition of Speaking of Faith: Why Religion Matters—and How to Talk About It.We were touched that several people from Penguin actually came along for the event (after all they can see authors whenever and wherever they want to), and this after we had been warmly welcomed and lunched and looked after by Carolyn Carlson, Krista’s editor, and Lindsay Prevette, her publicist.Some friends of the show also appeared to say hello: Majora Carter, of Sustainable South Bronx, Margaret Mockbee, the daughter of Samuel Mockbee (founder of Rural Studio at Auburn University), Paul Ruest, our friend from the Argot Network, and others. A delight.

In the Lions’ Den
Krista with Paul Holdengraber and Stuart Brown at the New York Public Library
Kate Moos, Managing Producer

Krista and I are back on the ground in frigid Minnesota. Last night a capacity crowd of nearly 250 people filled this lecture hall at the historic New York Public Library on 42nd Street in Manhattan. Krista and Stuart (of the National Institute for Play) were elegantly and playfully interviewed by Paul, who is the host of the NYPL’s ongoing LIVE series. The topic, approximately, was: how does the life of the spirit relate to the human capacity and need for play? And, Krista then signed the new paperback edition of Speaking of Faith: Why Religion Matters—and How to Talk About It.

We were touched that several people from Penguin actually came along for the event (after all they can see authors whenever and wherever they want to), and this after we had been warmly welcomed and lunched and looked after by Carolyn Carlson, Krista’s editor, and Lindsay Prevette, her publicist.

Some friends of the show also appeared to say hello: Majora Carter, of Sustainable South Bronx, Margaret Mockbee, the daughter of Samuel Mockbee (founder of Rural Studio at Auburn University), Paul Ruest, our friend from the Argot Network, and others. A delight.

Comments
Producing Jean VanierKate Moos, Managing ProducerEvery new show is the product of lots of research, editing, writing, and scrutiny. One of the big bench marks is the listen to the first mix, where we assess the program and often make significant changes. Here Senior Producer Mitch Hanley and Krista give their best ear to the Jean Vanier show scheduled for Christmas week, in a listen conducted earlier today. In the interview, the founder of L’Arche—a movement composed of people who live in community as “assistants” to people with disabilities— describes his personal theology and the need to embrace tenderness as a powerful religious virtue. Jean Vanier speaks with a quiet authority that is absolutely stunning. We are very excited about the program.

Producing Jean Vanier
Kate Moos, Managing Producer

Every new show is the product of lots of research, editing, writing, and scrutiny. One of the big bench marks is the listen to the first mix, where we assess the program and often make significant changes. Here Senior Producer Mitch Hanley and Krista give their best ear to the Jean Vanier show scheduled for Christmas week, in a listen conducted earlier today. In the interview, the founder of L’Arche—a movement composed of people who live in community as “assistants” to people with disabilities— describes his personal theology and the need to embrace tenderness as a powerful religious virtue. Jean Vanier speaks with a quiet authority that is absolutely stunning. We are very excited about the program.

Comments
The Rockefeller Grounds Kate Moos, Managing ProducerAfter a debrief session on the Consumed series we got a tour of the Rockefeller home and its grounds, where modern scultpures tumble casually—Serra, Calder, Brancusi—unbelievable. The house is full of H’an Dynasty porcelain, modern art, and a basement full of murals fashioned after Picassos. Here’s a shot from the verandah overlooking the beautiful Hudson River as late afternoon sun brilliantly turns to dusk.

The Rockefeller Grounds
Kate Moos, Managing Producer

After a debrief session on the Consumed series we got a tour of the Rockefeller home and its grounds, where modern scultpures tumble casually—Serra, Calder, Brancusi—unbelievable. The house is full of H’an Dynasty porcelain, modern art, and a basement full of murals fashioned after Picassos. Here’s a shot from the verandah overlooking the beautiful Hudson River as late afternoon sun brilliantly turns to dusk.

Comments

Very Cool Slideshow
Kate Moos, Managing Producer

Very cool slideshow produced by Colleen Scheck for SoF’s “Architecture of Decency” program.

Comments
A Conference on Climate Change Kate Moos, Managing ProducerProducer Colleen Scheck and I will be spending the next few days at the Pocantico Conference Center in New York, once the estate of the Rockefeller family. The occasion is a two day meeting of national producers from American Public Media, headquartered in Saint Paul, Minnesota. We’ll be briefed on new climate change research, and to have some chalk talk about our recently completed “Consumed” series. It promises to be enriching, and since we very rarely depart the office and leave our deadline-driven work for real, reflective conversation, we’re very much looking forward to it.

A Conference on Climate Change
Kate Moos, Managing Producer

Producer Colleen Scheck and I will be spending the next few days at the Pocantico Conference Center in New York, once the estate of the Rockefeller family. The occasion is a two day meeting of national producers from American Public Media, headquartered in Saint Paul, Minnesota. We’ll be briefed on new climate change research, and to have some chalk talk about our recently completed “Consumed” series. It promises to be enriching, and since we very rarely depart the office and leave our deadline-driven work for real, reflective conversation, we’re very much looking forward to it.

Comments
Just Because You Can, Doesn’t Mean You Should Trent Gilliss, Online EditorBeing a homeowner who has gutted and rehabbed a number of residences now, I’ve come to learn that materials really do have their place. Asphalt shingles work great on a pitched roof, but place them on a porch’s shed roof with a shallow incline… well, you’re begging for those newly laid floors of reclaimed Douglas fir from your upstairs attic to cup and bend. Wood putty is fine for those nail holes on an interior door. But, try to close the gap on those weathered storm windows — the first spring rain bubbles the paint and makes them look worse than before. Lessons learned.And, as you can see from the picture above, what worked beautifully as a retaining wall treatment in the Yancey “Tire” Chapel (1995) failed miserably on Tracy Shiles’ house. The stepped approach to the front entry hasn’t borne foot traffic well, and it wasn’t covered either. The flaking stuccoed tires reminds me of something Andrew Freear, the director of Rural Studio, told Krista in our anchor interview for SOF’s upcoming program, “An Architecture of Decency.”He views sustainability with a small ess. Instead of searching for “green” products with the proper FSC stamp or building structures that are LEED certified, Rural Studio emphasizes vernacular materials that require zero maintenance. The stuff has to be readily available, reusable, and understood by the owners so that it can be easily fixed. Their clients are scratching out a living and extra time, says Freear, needs to be spent making additional income, being with their families, or simply just resting from a hard day’s work.After all, this isn’t so hard to understand. How many of you have an uncle, grandfather, or dad who gripes every time he opens the hood of his Volkswagen Jetta or Toyota Prius or even a Ford Taurus because he can’t make simple repairs because of all the electronics being used? The same idea applies here. A Dutch-produced prefabricated cementitious fiberboard may be “green” and durable, but if it gets damaged in a storm, the owner can’t replace it. But, use corrugated sheet metal and the owner can find a piece at any scrap yard or vacant, tumbledown building in the tri-county area for the repair.

Just Because You Can, Doesn’t Mean You Should
Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

Being a homeowner who has gutted and rehabbed a number of residences now, I’ve come to learn that materials really do have their place. Asphalt shingles work great on a pitched roof, but place them on a porch’s shed roof with a shallow incline… well, you’re begging for those newly laid floors of reclaimed Douglas fir from your upstairs attic to cup and bend. Wood putty is fine for those nail holes on an interior door. But, try to close the gap on those weathered storm windows — the first spring rain bubbles the paint and makes them look worse than before. Lessons learned.

And, as you can see from the picture above, what worked beautifully as a retaining wall treatment in the Yancey “Tire” Chapel (1995) failed miserably on Tracy Shiles’ house. The stepped approach to the front entry hasn’t borne foot traffic well, and it wasn’t covered either. The flaking stuccoed tires reminds me of something Andrew Freear, the director of Rural Studio, told Krista in our anchor interview for SOF’s upcoming program, “An Architecture of Decency.”

He views sustainability with a small ess. Instead of searching for “green” products with the proper FSC stamp or building structures that are LEED certified, Rural Studio emphasizes vernacular materials that require zero maintenance. The stuff has to be readily available, reusable, and understood by the owners so that it can be easily fixed. Their clients are scratching out a living and extra time, says Freear, needs to be spent making additional income, being with their families, or simply just resting from a hard day’s work.

After all, this isn’t so hard to understand. How many of you have an uncle, grandfather, or dad who gripes every time he opens the hood of his Volkswagen Jetta or Toyota Prius or even a Ford Taurus because he can’t make simple repairs because of all the electronics being used? The same idea applies here. A Dutch-produced prefabricated cementitious fiberboard may be “green” and durable, but if it gets damaged in a storm, the owner can’t replace it. But, use corrugated sheet metal and the owner can find a piece at any scrap yard or vacant, tumbledown building in the tri-county area for the repair.

Comments