On Being Tumblr

On Being Tumblr

On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

One of my favorite Instagrammers is the adventurous photographer Aaron Huey (aka argonautphoto). I awakened to this morning to see this quiet video of Boudhanath Stupa in Kathmandu, Nepal, one of Mr. Huey’s favorite places.

Be sure and subscribe to his feed. He’s always on the road, capturing magical landscapes and people — from the mountains of Asia to the reservations of South Dakota.

~Trent Gilliss, head of content

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My Modern Met has posted Kamil Tamiola’s mystical series of images of a frozen waterfall on Italy’s Cascate di Lillaz. The photographer puts it so poignantly:

“Vertical ice formations are something truly special, emanating with great power and provoking deep emotions.”

Be sure and check out the rest of Tamiola’s photos.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

My Modern Met has posted Kamil Tamiola’s mystical series of images of a frozen waterfall on Italy’s Cascate di Lillaz. The photographer puts it so poignantly:

“Vertical ice formations are something truly special, emanating with great power and provoking deep emotions.”

Be sure and check out the rest of Tamiola’s photos.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments

trentgilliss:

I grew up with Evil Knievel and the Flying Wallendas. Thrilling as their stunts were, it was always a noisy spectacle. It seemed to be more about man conquering the Grand Canyon or the Tallulah Gorge than interacting with nature. The backdrop was a prop.

In this video, though, Michael Schaefer and Dean Potter create a scene as thrilling in its composition as in the act itself of walking the highline at Cathedral Peak. As the sun sets and descends, the moon rises and looms large — the orb cradling the dyad of rock towers turned burnt-red. As the National Geographic filmmakers say, it is “the ultimate full moon shot” — captured from over a mile away with a serious telephoto lens.

As Mr. Potterbegins his unaided walk, you hear the camera operator take deep, calm but anxious, meditative breaths. And you breathe with him. Oh, if we all could witness such panoramic beauty like this each day…

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