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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Alan Rabinowitz: A Twitterscript

by Anne Breckbill, associate web developer

Alan Rabinowitz Rides an ElephantOn June 30, Krista interviewed Alan Rabinowitz for this week’s show "A Voice for the Animals" — discussing topics ranging from his severe stutter, Dawi (the last pure Mongoloid pygmy), large wild cats, genetic corridors, and his recent cancer diagnosis. We live-tweet (SOFtweets) all of our interviews now. Here is the Twitterscript of that interview:

  1. In 10 minutes, we’ll be live-tweeting Krista’s interview with Alan Rabinowitz, dubbed the “Indiana Jones” of wildlife science.
  2. As Alan Rabinowitz sits in his chair, he says, “Grabbing a taxi on 5th Avenue is much more challenging that tracking a tiger in Bhutan.”
  3. Rabinowitz — “What turned me away from religion is what people were saying or reading did not go along with their actions.”
  4. Rabinowitz on his childhood stuttering — “Most stutterers can do two things: sing, and you can speak to animals.”
  5. Rabinowitz — “Over and over, I swore to myself as a child if I ever found my voice that I’d be there for them [animals].”
  6. Rabinowitz — “…[I found that] when I could speak fluidly, most people didn’t have that much to say that’s interesting.”
  7. Rabinowitz — “I associate myself with those who pit themselves against environmental hardships than I do with pure scientists.”
  8. Rabinowitz — “Science is a language of truths that would be there whether humans would be there or not.”
  9. Alan Rabinowitz is talking about a pivotal moment of his life when he found the Taron in the Himalayan foothills.
  10. Dawi, a Taron tribal elder asking Alan Rabinowitz why isn’t a father — “You act like a man who still has this deep, deep hole inside of him.”
  11. Rabinowitz — “We had to save the last tigers. Tigers are just plummeting.”
  12. Rabinowitz — “The dictatorship in Burma consists of several dozen generals. The one man on top is the controlling influence.”
  13. Rabinowitz — “Being among these remote communities showed me a model how people can live w/ their environment and can move forward.”
  14. Rabinowitz — “You can tell a person from Churchill because they’re always looking around the corner.”
  15. Rabinowitz — “You can tell a person from Churchill because they’re always looking around the corner.”
  16. Rabinowitz — “I rarely meet a Mayan now carrying a gun..’if we see a jaguar we stop on our bicycle and watch it now.’”
  17. Engineer Chris Heagle summarizing Alan Rabinowitz talking with Krista Tippett — “Marriage is like confronting a wild leopard”
  18. Rabinowitz — Genetic corridors for large cats vital to saving them - more than conservation parks http://is.gd/daooj
  19. Rabinowitz — “Stuttering gave me my life. I’m so pleased to be born a stutterer, because that’s how I got to where I am.”
  20. Rabinowitz — “As I get older and have thoughts of slowing down, I get told ‘I have cancer” and that has the opposite effect.”
  21. Rabinowitz — “I don’t see myself as a hero..I see myself as lucky for being able to..pursue the things I love that made me feel whole.”
  22. Rabinowitz on his son’s stuttering — “Seeing my son sad is painful. Although stuttering gave me my life it’s not something I wish on anyone else.”
  23. Rabinowitz on continuing adventures despite having cancer — “I had to live the life that defined me the best, both to myself and to my family”
  24. Rabinowitz — “I truly believe when you attempt to do good things for good reasons a lot of positive energy gets out there in the world.”
  25. Rabinowitz — “It doesn’t matter if life is short or long, it matters if there’s meaning for you personally.”
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Michael McCullough on Revenge and Forgiveness
Shiraz Janjua, Associate Producer

A show we’re working on features psychologist Michael McCullough. He wrote a book about the evolutionary psychology behind the behaviors of forgiveness and revenge, and how that affects everyone from primates to politicians (huge gap, I know). He says we need to understand those origins in order to better serve our moral institutions today. Above is a clip from the rough cut of the show that makes the animal kingdom sound like The Godfather.

McCullough is a Ph.D. at the University of Miami in the departments of Psychology and Religious Studies. His many scientific papers focus on forgiveness and revenge, gratitude, and religious development in people’s lives. Some introductory ones:

He recently wrote something for The Huffington Post on the virtue of forgiveness — timely wisdom for the future president of the U.S., whoever that may end up being. “The ability to control revenge and broker forgiveness among groups in conflict is a crucial, though underappreciated, element of statecraft.”

The show should be online and on the air in two weeks.

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