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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
For all you lovers of ponies, these pictures from the guardian of Astro stuck in the Australian beach mud will get you in the genechtagaoink. And, the outcome:

The incredible story of one woman’s loyalty to her horse – she spent three hours holding its head above the tide after it got stuck in the mud on a beach in Australia. More here

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

For all you lovers of ponies, these pictures from the guardian of Astro stuck in the Australian beach mud will get you in the genechtagaoink. And, the outcome:

The incredible story of one woman’s loyalty to her horse – she spent three hours holding its head above the tide after it got stuck in the mud on a beach in Australia. More here

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Judy Atkinson: A Twitterscript

by Anne Breckbill, associate web developer

On August 10, 2010, Krista Tippett interviewed Australian Judy Atkinson, an expert in violence, trauma/healing, and aboriginal people. The following is the complete Twitterscript from that interview.

  1. Krista is starting to interview Australian Judy Atkinson, an expert in violence, trauma and healing, and aboriginals.
  2. Judy Atkinson talks about her history-the story of the Hornet Bank massacre, one of many in Australia during colonization http://is.gd/ecaKr
  3. "A symptom of trauma is to act out — what’s gotten into the deepest part of the soul has to come out again." — Judy Atkinson
  4. "The middle of the cyclone feels safe, but it’s still moving. You have to decide to move through it to come out the other side."
  5. "Cultural art/dance is about taking the pain of human existence and recycling it so when we emerge we become strong…" — Judy Atkinson
  6. "As I think and talk to you I’m creating a future. If I talk to you with anger, distress…then I take that into my future." — Judy Atkinson
  7. Judy Atkinson speaks of discovering Dadirri - Aboriginal deep listening, awareness, and contemplation. http://is.gd/eccs8
  8. "We have to be able to put our hands out to each other, sit with each other, and not push away the stories that need to be told." — Judy Atkinson
  9. "Respond when a person asks for help because that’s the best time you can help a person or community." — Judy Atkinson on helping others
  10. "The more we listen to each other with real intent, the more we understand the richness in our souls that we can share with others." — Judy Atkinson
  11. "It’s from the depths of our pain that we grow — it’s not when everything’s fine and hunky-dory." — Judy Atkinson on sitting with pain
  12. "As we make sense of our [pain] stories, the stories change and we transcend them." — Judy Atkinson
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The Offering: A Sculptural Site Intervention
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Meditation and contemplation take many forms. Often we (at least I do) think of this act of introspection and focus as being a peaceful, tranquil experience where the noise of machinery recedes to make way for internal silence and harmony. But, Australian artist Robbie Rowlands' creative vision saddles up those moments of sitting and evaluating with the harmonious execution of circular saws and hammers. They are more than instruments of delivery; they are the yogis, to some extent:

Cut of Community Hall"The cut, for me, is so violent. Well, not violent. It’s incredibly tense. That’s why working with the power tools is quite crucial to the work, because, it demands your full attention. You have to have full concentration."

Rowlands makes this point in the film above, which documents his dissection of a single story, clapboard church and community hall in Dandenong, Victoria originally built in 1904. Described as a “sculptural site intervention,” The Offering uses only the materials contained within the structure itself to create the installation.

And, for the observer, the exposed layers of history reveal symbols and moments in time worthy of introspection. History becomes the meditative center. And, once again for a brief while, this church becomes an anchor in its community — and a spiritual center worth meditating upon.

Update (June 2, 2010): I just happened upon this radio documentary from ABC Radio National about The Offering. Aside from the visual, what differentiates this piece from above is its inclusion of residents who used to inhabit the space — from a member of a Hindu religious group to a man who used to take dance lessons there. Well worth a listen.

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Ramadan Down Under

Colleen Scheck, Producer

Screen Shot of Break-Fast at Mobinah'sThe Australian Broadcasting Company offers a lot of religion programming across multiple formats, so I like to keep an eye on what they’re doing. This week, the television program Compass is replaying a 2008 episode that followed two Muslim families during Ramadan. In light of our Revealing Ramadan project, I enjoyed watching this 30-minute video about how Muslims “down under” experience the holy month:

"Break-Fast At Mobinah’s"

Ramadan, the world-wide Muslim month of fasting and feasting, has begun and Compass follows two families through the most important event on the Islamic calendar. Fadi and his family are Lebanese-Australians who run a busy restaurant. Each day, on empty stomachs, they cook for crowds of ravenous diners who descend after sunset. Mobinah Ahmad and her extended Indian-Australian family work and study through Ramadan, and hope to lose a little weight along the way. The Ahmads also run Sydney’s largest Eid celebration to mark the end of Ramadan. What sustains them through the day when food doesn’t? And how can not eating bring you closer to Allah?

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Capturing a Conversation in an Image Trent Gilliss, Online Editor  One of the most time-consuming and rewarding parts of my job is sifting through hundreds, if not thousands, of images — usually photographs — for use on the Web site and in the e-mail newsletter for each week’s show. I attempt to bring another layer of meaning and understanding to the broadcast/podcast, and, when I’m on my game, a moment of transcendent elegance and beauty.  Much like the music chosen in our program, each image to me is a unique content element with its own story, even if it’s not clearly defined. One photo may just catch the eye enough for you to read on; another may make you crinkle your nose a bit and wonder why did they choose that one.  I relish ambiguity and subtlety. I prefer photographs that cause the viewer to ask more questions than offer answers. I prefer to honor the viewers intellect and curiosity rather than simply report the story. For SOF, I prefer human images to inanimate objects.  For this week’s program "Inside Mormon Faith" I struggled to create a group of images to choose from. Of course, there were loads of photographs of LDS temples from all points on the globe — some absolutely haunting and dramatic:  (photo: Russell Mondy)  And some ethereal and expressive (taken with a toy camera):  (photo: William “formica”/Flickr)  When I was looking for more human, pedestrian moments, I saw photos by a reporter from the Sunday Times of London (don’t you just adore the guy covering his face) of Mitt campaigning :  (photo: Tony Allen-Mills)  Oh, yes, a rock band pretending to be Mormons:  (photo: BLKHRTMDR/Flickr)  …and young men singing Christmas carols and speaking to non-Mormons:  (photo: Michael Ignatov)  (photo: Brian “hoveringdog”/Flickr)  But, in the end, the decision came down to two images, with this one losing out by a hair. What I appreciated about it was the repeating patterns of the brick, the interaction of LDS members in different ways in a very pedestrian manner — waiting at a bus stop.  (photo: Simon Knott)  I ended up going with the image leading this post because of one thing. The young man was looking into the camera without posing but was in the background surrounded by other passersby. It had a greater depth I couldn’t ignore.  What would you have gone with? Should I have been looking in different places?

Capturing a Conversation in an Image
Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

One of the most time-consuming and rewarding parts of my job is sifting through hundreds, if not thousands, of images — usually photographs — for use on the Web site and in the e-mail newsletter for each week’s show. I attempt to bring another layer of meaning and understanding to the broadcast/podcast, and, when I’m on my game, a moment of transcendent elegance and beauty.

Much like the music chosen in our program, each image to me is a unique content element with its own story, even if it’s not clearly defined. One photo may just catch the eye enough for you to read on; another may make you crinkle your nose a bit and wonder why did they choose that one.

I relish ambiguity and subtlety. I prefer photographs that cause the viewer to ask more questions than offer answers. I prefer to honor the viewers intellect and curiosity rather than simply report the story. For SOF, I prefer human images to inanimate objects.

For this week’s program "Inside Mormon Faith" I struggled to create a group of images to choose from. Of course, there were loads of photographs of LDS temples from all points on the globe — some absolutely haunting and dramatic:
(photo: Russell Mondy)

And some ethereal and expressive (taken with a toy camera):
(photo: William “formica”/Flickr)

When I was looking for more human, pedestrian moments, I saw photos by a reporter from the Sunday Times of London (don’t you just adore the guy covering his face) of Mitt campaigning :
(photo: Tony Allen-Mills)

Oh, yes, a rock band pretending to be Mormons:
(photo: BLKHRTMDR/Flickr)

…and young men singing Christmas carols and speaking to non-Mormons:

(photo: Michael Ignatov)


(photo: Brian “hoveringdog”/Flickr)

But, in the end, the decision came down to two images, with this one losing out by a hair. What I appreciated about it was the repeating patterns of the brick, the interaction of LDS members in different ways in a very pedestrian manner — waiting at a bus stop.
(photo: Simon Knott)

I ended up going with the image leading this post because of one thing. The young man was looking into the camera without posing but was in the background surrounded by other passersby. It had a greater depth I couldn’t ignore.

What would you have gone with? Should I have been looking in different places?

Comments