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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

One of my favorite Instagrammers is the adventurous photographer Aaron Huey (aka argonautphoto). I awakened to this morning to see this quiet video of Boudhanath Stupa in Kathmandu, Nepal, one of Mr. Huey’s favorite places.

Be sure and subscribe to his feed. He’s always on the road, capturing magical landscapes and people — from the mountains of Asia to the reservations of South Dakota.

~Trent Gilliss, head of content

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Hatred and non-hatred. Transforming our relationships with our own selves and those we’re at odds with. Most everybody thinks about these things during the day. But how do we do it? How do we work with our outer and inner enemies?

A few months back I picked up a book. The title, Love Our Enemies. It’s quite remarkable because of the friendship of the two authors, Sharon Salzberg and Robert Thurman. They ground each other in usefulness and big-picture thinking. 

So I pitched them for the podcast. But only as a pairing. It worked. Brilliantly. Listen in and I guarantee they’ll bring you joy and some solutions to breaking the cycle of hurt, anger, and revenge.

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Our recent interview with Sounds True founder Tami Simon, whom I guess you might label a “spiritual entrepreneur.” She’s built a successful multimedia publishing company with a mission to disseminate “spiritual wisdom” by diverse teachers and thinkers like Pema Chödrön and Eckhart Tolle, Daniel Goleman and Brené Brown. She offers compelling lessons on joining inner life with life in the workplace — and advice on spiritual practice with a mobile device.

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A big, tough samurai once went to see a little monk.



"Monk!”



He barked, in a voice accustomed to instant obedience.



"Teach me about heaven and hell!"



The monk looked up at the mighty warrior and replied with utter disdain,



"Teach you about heaven and hell? I couldn’t teach you about anything. You’re dumb. You’re dirty. You’re a disgrace, an embarrassment to the samurai class. Get out of my sight. I can’t stand you."



The samurai got furious. He shook, red in the face, speechless with rage. He pulled out his sword, and prepared to slay the monk.
Looking straight into the samurai’s eyes, the monk said softly,



"That’s hell."



The samurai froze, realizing the compassion of the monk who had risked his life to show him hell! He put down his sword and fell to his knees, filled with gratitude.
The monk said softly,



"And that’s heaven."



Excerpted from Conscious Business: How to Build Value Through Values.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

A big, tough samurai once went to see a little monk.

"Monk!

He barked, in a voice accustomed to instant obedience.

"Teach me about heaven and hell!"

The monk looked up at the mighty warrior and replied with utter disdain,

"Teach you about heaven and hell? I couldn’t teach you about anything. You’re dumb. You’re dirty. You’re a disgrace, an embarrassment to the samurai class. Get out of my sight. I can’t stand you."

The samurai got furious. He shook, red in the face, speechless with rage. He pulled out his sword, and prepared to slay the monk.

Looking straight into the samurai’s eyes, the monk said softly,

"That’s hell."

The samurai froze, realizing the compassion of the monk who had risked his life to show him hell! He put down his sword and fell to his knees, filled with gratitude.

The monk said softly,

"And that’s heaven."

Excerpted from Conscious Business: How to Build Value Through Values.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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"When there is a great disappointment, we don’t know if that’s the end of the story. It may be just the beginning of a great adventure."
~Pema Chödrön

"When there is a great disappointment, we don’t know if that’s the end of the story. It may be just the beginning of a great adventure."

~Pema Chödrön

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Esoteric teachings on reincarnation and consciousness; simple teachings on compassion and ethics. Geshe Thupten Jinpa is a man who finishes the Dalai Lama’s English sentences. This On Being interview with the philosopher and former monk, now a husband and father of two daughters, is a meditation on what happens when the ancient tradition embodied in the Dalai Lama meets science and life.

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"For there is nothing heavier than compassion. Not even one’s own pain weighs so heavy as the pain one feels with someone, for someone, a pain intensified by the imagination."
~Milan Kundera from The Unbearable Lightness of Being
Listen to: Compassion’s Edge States: Roshi Joan Halifax on Caring Better
Photo Hartwig HKD

"For there is nothing heavier than compassion. Not even one’s own pain weighs so heavy as the pain one feels with someone, for someone, a pain intensified by the imagination."

~Milan Kundera from The Unbearable Lightness of Being

Listen to: Compassion’s Edge States: Roshi Joan Halifax on Caring Better

Photo Hartwig HKD

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seajee:

This is what I found in the bedside table at the Four Seasons Vancouver, where my parents stayed when they visited. I’ve always either only seen a Bible or no Bible, never anything else. 

The Teaching of Buddha goes toe-to-toe with the Gideon Bible in the Four Seasons. How marvelous.

seajee:

This is what I found in the bedside table at the Four Seasons Vancouver, where my parents stayed when they visited. I’ve always either only seen a Bible or no Bible, never anything else. 

The Teaching of Buddha goes toe-to-toe with the Gideon Bible in the Four Seasons. How marvelous.

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See what is. Acknowledge it without judging it as right or wrong. See it clearly without judgment and let it go. Come back to the present moment. From now until the moment of your death, you could do this. As a way of becoming more compassionate, as way of becoming less dogmatic, prejudiced, determined to have your own way, absolutely sure that you’re right and the other person is wrong, as a way to develop a sense of humor, to lighten it up, open it up, you could do this.
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Pema Chodron


I think the second line is most difficult, one constantly in tension with the mind.

(via trentgilliss)

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What a pleasing photo from Smithsonian magazine:

 
Photo of the Day: A monk and seagulls on Inle Lake, Myanmar. 
Photo by: SauKhiang Chau (Bukit Mertajam, Penang, Malaysia); Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

What a pleasing photo from Smithsonian magazine:

Photo of the Day: A monk and seagulls on Inle Lake, Myanmar.

Photo by: SauKhiang Chau (Bukit Mertajam, Penang, Malaysia); Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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An incredible series of photographs by Kenro Izu of Cambodia’s undiscovered ancient temples. The one above, Prasat Neang Khmau, was built in the tenth century and “is also known as the Temple of the Black Lady—its name perhaps alludes to Kali, the dark goddess of destruction.”
(via condenasttraveler)
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

An incredible series of photographs by Kenro Izu of Cambodia’s undiscovered ancient temples. The one above, Prasat Neang Khmau, was built in the tenth century and “is also known as the Temple of the Black Lady—its name perhaps alludes to Kali, the dark goddess of destruction.”

(via condenasttraveler)

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Adam Yauch’s Buddhism in Two Tracks

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

I’d like to send you off this Saturday with a pairing of tracks from the Beastie Boys’ Ill Communication: “Shambhala” and “Boddhisatva Vow.” After I read Tricycle's interview with Adam Yauch about his life and his commitment to Buddhism in the mid-1990s, I came across this photo and caption by an Aussie, Julian Wearne:

A tribute to Adam Yauch

I woke up this morning to hear the sad news about Adam ‘MCA’ Yauch’s passing after a three-year battle with cancer. I felt the only appropriate thing to do was put Paul’s Boutique on the turntable, turn it up, and enjoy one of the finest hip-hop albums ever released.

I’m not religious at all, and I’m not at all educated on the teachings of Buddhism, but I do think MCA’s interpretation of Buddhism can teach anyone a lot. From his song “Bodhisattva Vow”:

A Strength From Within To Go The Length
Seeing Others Are As Important As Myself
I Strive For A Happiness Of Mental Wealth
With The Interconnectedness That We Share As One
Every Action That We Take Affects Everyone
So In Deciding For What A Situation Calls
There Is A Path For The Good For All”

I’ve listened to these tracks so many times but had never really thought about the lyrics and what they said or whom they came from. It should’ve been obvious, but it took an Aussie’s photo on Flickr to shine a light on them in a new way. I hope you take a few minutes to listen to these tracks and remember the life of MCA, a phenomenal artist and a fine human being.

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I think there are a lot of misconceptions in society in general about what actually brings happiness, we’re caught up in all these ideas that having a lot of money or having somebody beautiful to have sex with or having some cool objects, having a cool car, cool stereo or whatever is gonna make us happy. And those things actually don’t bring us happiness. I’ve learned a tremendous amount about how compassion or altruism actually brings a person happiness and I think that’s a lot of what’s trying to be put forward through the concerts and it seems like the optimum way to put those ideas forward is through helping the Tibetans gain their freedom because those values are so inherent within Tibetan culture.
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Adan YauchAdam Yauch (1964-2012), MCA of the Beastie Boys, from the Frontline report "Dreams of Tibet"

Yauch, best known by his rap moniker MCA of the Beastie Boys and his activism for Tibetan freedom, died yesterday from a three-year battle with cancer. Jaweed Kaleem offers a fine round-up for The Huffington Post on how Buddhist spirituality permeated his life and music, noting that he was “born in Brooklyn, New York to a Catholic father and a Jewish mother, [and] had practiced Buddhism since 1994.”

In the photo to the right, Yauch speaks at a press conference on June 13, 1998 prior to the Tibet Freedom concert at RFK Stadium in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Stephen Jaffe/AFP/Getty Images)

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Thich Nhat Hanh, Tornadoes, and Being Present in the Moment

by Joe DePlasco, guest contributor

Oklahoma from the RoadThis past Sunday, I had the great pleasure of sitting next to Mary Emeny at a dinner in Amarillo, Texas where we were showing highlights of Ken Burns’ upcoming film, The Dust Bowl. Mary, I later learned, is prominent in the arts and environmental communities in Amarillo. When I asked someone else at the table what Mary did, she responded, “She makes Amarillo worth living in for the rest of us.”

During our chat, Mary spoke about her trips to Vietnam as a young woman and, specifically, her work with Buddhist monks there on behalf of Thich Nhat Hanh, the Vietnamese Buddhist monk. (Vietnam came up because Ken Burns is working on a film about the war in Vietnam.)

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