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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
Update: As theradioriot points out, this calligraphy is actually English. The reblogger can only offer this explanation.

Can somebody who reads Arabic calligraphy verify this quote from deathful?

“Time is a great teacher, unfortunately it kills all its students.”

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Update: As theradioriot points out, this calligraphy is actually English. The reblogger can only offer this explanation.

Can somebody who reads Arabic calligraphy verify this quote from deathful?

“Time is a great teacher, unfortunately it kills all its students.”

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Update: As theradioriot points out, this calligraphy is actually English. The reblogger can only offer this explanation.

Can somebody who reads Arabic calligraphy verify this quote from deathful?

“Time is a great teacher, unfortunately it kills all its students.”

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
A Poster Appropriate for Ramadan Learning
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
This poster for the course ”Exploring the Treasures of Ramadhan” from the Cambridge Islamic Science Seminars is beautifully constructed, don’t you think? I love the way the colors and calligraphy are fused with contemporary typography and layout. They eye wants to meander about for awhile.
Oh, and by the slim chance that any one of you who’s reading this post actually attended this seminar, would you mind sharing your experience of Dr. Nadwi’s presentation? Leave a comment here if you feel comfortable, or feel free to email me at tgilliss@onbeing.org.
Image courtesy of the Cambridge Islamic Sciences Seminars.
A Poster Appropriate for Ramadan Learning
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
This poster for the course ”Exploring the Treasures of Ramadhan” from the Cambridge Islamic Science Seminars is beautifully constructed, don’t you think? I love the way the colors and calligraphy are fused with contemporary typography and layout. They eye wants to meander about for awhile.
Oh, and by the slim chance that any one of you who’s reading this post actually attended this seminar, would you mind sharing your experience of Dr. Nadwi’s presentation? Leave a comment here if you feel comfortable, or feel free to email me at tgilliss@onbeing.org.
Image courtesy of the Cambridge Islamic Sciences Seminars.

A Poster Appropriate for Ramadan Learning

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

This poster for the course ”Exploring the Treasures of Ramadhan” from the Cambridge Islamic Science Seminars is beautifully constructed, don’t you think? I love the way the colors and calligraphy are fused with contemporary typography and layout. They eye wants to meander about for awhile.

Oh, and by the slim chance that any one of you who’s reading this post actually attended this seminar, would you mind sharing your experience of Dr. Nadwi’s presentation? Leave a comment here if you feel comfortable, or feel free to email me at tgilliss@onbeing.org.

Image courtesy of the Cambridge Islamic Sciences Seminars.

Comments

The Process of Creating the St. John’s Bible
Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

Our show for this week — called "Preserving Words and Worlds" — focuses on the pioneering and valiant efforts of manuscript preservation being spearheaded by the Benedictine monks of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library at St. John’s Abbey & University. The importance of the words and language of these precious handwritten texts is vital to understanding other civilizations and cultures, as Fr. Columba Stewart and Getatchew Haile point out.

But, these two scholars speak as much about the importance of the container itself. The vessel gives context to the manuscript, and to the people producing and using these texts. Elements like the type of paper used, the binding, the style of calligraphy, the marginalia, the general wear-and-tear all indicate how it was used, who used it, and, in essence, its innate value to those people using it and their ancestors.

When I think about it this way, I better understand why the same institution also commissioned a multi-million dollar project to create the first handwritten Bible since the printing press was invented. It’s what they did in medieval times and that monastic legacy is being carried on today, albeit with the expedience of modern technology and communication.

Artistic efforts like these I find true and sincere, not a fancy facade masking an ordinary box. Hearkening to ancient traditions and materials, this illuminated Bible incorporates hand-ground inks and eggs and feathers and vellum with platinum, gold, and silver foils. And, being a project of the modern era, it uses computers and sophisticated software programs and broadband connection to lay out the book and communicate with a host of overseers in making everything’s correct.

This short video about the St. John’s Bible project is instructive, to be sure, but it also gives me insight into the magic of creating a manuscript — and the monumental task of coordinating it.

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