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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Walter Brueggemann was such a kind, generous person to meet and witness in studio. And, on this Christmas day, I can think of few theologians I’d rather listen to talk about the poetic imagination and the prophetic tradition in Christianity than Mr. B.

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What the church does with its creeds and its doctrinal tradition, it flattens out all the images and metaphors to make it fit into a nice little formulation and then it’s deathly. So we have to communicate to people, if you want a God that is healthier than that, you’re going to have to take time to sit with these images and relish them and let them become a part of your prayer life and your vocabulary and your conceptual frame. Which, again, is why the poetry is so important because the poetry just keeps opening and opening and opening whereas the doctrinal practice of the church is always to close and close and close until you’re left with nothing that has any transformative power.
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~Walter Brueggeman,

His entire conversation with Krista Tippett is riveting. "The Prophetic Imagination," a good episode to listen to this time of year.

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What might words like repentance or forgiveness mean, culturally, in this moment? These are questions of the emerging church, a loosely-defined movement that crosses generations, theologies and social ideologies in the hope of reimagining Christianity. With Phyllis Tickle and Vincent Harding, we bring you an honest (and sometimes politically incorrect) conversation on coming to terms with racial identity in the church and in the world:

"The great American experiment with building a multiracial democracy is still in the laboratory. We have got to be willing to see ourselves as part of an experiment that is actively working its way through right now. We stumble. We hold on to each other. We hug each other. We fight with one another in loving ways. But we keep moving and experimenting and trying to figure it out."
"There’s a difference between repentance and forgiveness and there’s a difference between those in grace. And if we do this thing that Vincent’s talking about, if we refashion this country — which we’re going to do — but if we do it without grace, it will be just as clunky and just as unfortunate. And just as many people will get the short end of the stick as has been true in the past."

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"We’re anti-excellence but pro-participation."
~Nadia Bolz-Weber (@sarcasticluther) on her ELCA congregation in Denver called House for All Sinners and Saints
via trentgilliss

"We’re anti-excellence but pro-participation."

~Nadia Bolz-Weber (@sarcasticluther) on her ELCA congregation in Denver called House for All Sinners and Saints

via trentgilliss

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"We’re at our worst when we present our faith as a system rather than as a story."
~Brian McLaren with Krista Tippett at the Wild Goose Festival
(via trentgilliss)

"We’re at our worst when we present our faith as a system rather than as a story."

~Brian McLaren with Krista Tippett at the Wild Goose Festival

(via trentgilliss)

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On this sad day commemorating 45 years since MLK’s death, a reminder that his message of nonviolence and the beloved community lives on in the work of one of his closest friends and confidants, Congressman John Lewis.

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Krista Tippett interviews civil rights legend and Congressman John Lewis in Montgomery, Alabama during the Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage. Amazing man!

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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With the abundance of coverage of the Roman Catholic Church and the Vatican, here’s our show about a Jesuit priest who’s living a life of Christian service that flies under the radar. Father Greg Boyle’s gang intervention programs in Los Angeles are becoming more well-known, but his ideas behind them often get short shrift.

He makes winsome connections between service and delight, and compassion and awe. He heads Homeboy Industries, which employs former gang members in a constellation of businesses. This is not work of helping, he says, but of finding kinship. The point of Christian service, as he lives it, is about “our common calling to delight in one another.”

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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anniebissett:

Reducing the block (carving same block again) after one printing.

This is incredible.

anniebissett:

Reducing the block (carving same block again) after one printing.

This is incredible.

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“When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty, I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”
~C.S. Lewis, On Stories: And Other Essays in Literature
Photo by Lucinda Lovering/Flickr, cc by-nd 2.0

“When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty, I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”

~C.S. Lewis, On Stories: And Other Essays in Literature

Photo by Lucinda Lovering/Flickr, cc by-nd 2.0

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postcardsfromamerica:

Tuesday, Election Day. New York City, The Rockaways.
Gilles Peress

Whoa. Powerful shot.

postcardsfromamerica:

Tuesday, Election Day. New York City, The Rockaways.

Gilles Peress

Whoa. Powerful shot.

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Standing in the lowly place with the easily despised, and the readily left out, and with the demonized — so that the demonizing will stop — and with the disposable — so that the day will come when we stop throwing people away. That gives me life, that’s where I want to be. I think that’s where Jesus insists on standing.
- Fr. Greg Boyle, from his interview with Krista Tippett at the Chautauqua Institution
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Serpent handlers, like other Christians, have chosen something to emphasize. Over the course of two thousand years, others have chosen the precise nature and identity of Christ, the proper understanding and practice of the Eucharist, the correct way to baptize, the proper way to organize a church, which day of the week to call the Sabbath, and any number of other things as the sine qua non of being a true Christian, and in each case some other Christians have regarded that defining center of faith as ‘adiaphora’ — something indifferent.
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Mack Wolford + KateSeth Perry, excerpted from his commentary "Adiaphora and the Dark Extremes of an Eccentric Faith"

How do we respect the depth of a Christian snake handler’s faith — and talk about it without caricaturing or lauding his life?

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A smug atheist reading of [Richard] Florida’s number-crunching would be that people who go to church a lot are less likely than people who don’t to move up the economic ladder. But a more accurate reading, I think, would be that people who who go to church a lot are more likely to move up. It’s the people who bend your ear about how much they love Jesus who are less likely to move up (and who are also less likely to attend church regularly). The irony is that it’s these zealots who want to claim an exclusive right to call themselves Christian.
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Timothy Noah, from his post "Religion and Mobility" on The New Republic site.

You might want to read Richard Florida’s piece on The Atlantic Cities first and then follow it up with Noah’s reaction. Both are well worth reading and may lead you down all types of paths depending on your experiences and where you live, or have lived. 

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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