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On Being Tumblr

On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Hey, check out this 3D rendering of the storefront of our new office on Hennepin Ave in Minneapolis. The building is located near Loring Park, which is the religious and cultural hub of the city — with the Basilica of St. Mary directly across the street, the Walker Art Center and Sculpture Garden a block away, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, and Minneapolis Community & Technical College just up the street.
The space pictured in the image above will be an intimate live events space. We can seat 25-60 (I prefer to keep it below 25) and we plan on having Krista Tippett (our host) conduct interviews next to the 17-foot library wall. But, we also hope to make it available for the community to hold informal salons and cultural exchanges that deepen our connection with the community. It’s a place of exchange and reciprocity, in which we as journalists and the media get a chance to learn and remember why we’re in this profession.
Here are two more renderings from different perspectives. From the front of the house looking into the space, you can see our studio with the herringbone pattern wrapped in Douglas fir:

And, from the back of the space looking toward Hennepin Avenue:


~Trent Gilliss, chief content officer

Hey, check out this 3D rendering of the storefront of our new office on Hennepin Ave in Minneapolis. The building is located near Loring Park, which is the religious and cultural hub of the city — with the Basilica of St. Mary directly across the street, the Walker Art Center and Sculpture Garden a block away, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, and Minneapolis Community & Technical College just up the street.

The space pictured in the image above will be an intimate live events space. We can seat 25-60 (I prefer to keep it below 25) and we plan on having Krista Tippett (our host) conduct interviews next to the 17-foot library wall. But, we also hope to make it available for the community to hold informal salons and cultural exchanges that deepen our connection with the community. It’s a place of exchange and reciprocity, in which we as journalists and the media get a chance to learn and remember why we’re in this profession.

Here are two more renderings from different perspectives. From the front of the house looking into the space, you can see our studio with the herringbone pattern wrapped in Douglas fir:

20130820_Design Perspectives_with KTPP comments_Page_2

And, from the back of the space looking toward Hennepin Avenue:

20130820_Design Perspectives_with KTPP comments_Page_1

~Trent Gilliss, chief content officer

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But there is a different story in the DNA of Oklahoma politics. It’s a truly forgotten story in the relatively brief history of this state that people fled the past to create. When the former Indian Territory became Oklahoma in 1907, it had one of the most progressive constitutions in the union, influenced largely by a farmer-labor coalition. Yet small farmers and laborers—75 percent of the population of around two million by 1920—grew less secure and more economically burdened in the early years of statehood, while “New White elites” (bankers, lawyers, merchants and landlords) flourished. These increasingly downtrodden voters gave Socialist presidential candidate Eugene Debs 16 percent of the Oklahoma vote in 1912, compared with 6 percent nationally. And for a tumultuous moment a decade later, a semi-Socialist grassroots Oklahoma movement elected a governor. …

There are echoes of those farmers and laborers in today’s tea partiers and Wall Street occupiers, but also in Democrats and Republicans who long to recover their faith in politics. A faith in politics, and a determination to make politics work anew for common people, finds impassioned and often eloquent expression in the forgotten pages of the Reconstructionist. Its voices, and its lessons, deserve remembering.

Comments