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On Being Tumblr

On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
Just mesmerized with this image of a deconstructed galaxy cluster of RX J1532.9+3021, located about 3.9 billion light years from Earth. Reminds me of this great conversation with Natalie Batalha: 

We don’t get to experience that very often, having this complete dome over your head, which is the universe. But the experience that I had was that I saw the Milky Way arcing through the sky. I saw planets that were in the sky. I think there was a crescent moon that was in the sky. I could see the large and small Magellanic Clouds, which are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way. I saw the Coalsack Nebula, which is this giant molecular cloud between us and the center of the galaxy. I saw all of these things and I knew something about them. I had knowledge of them and this knowledge of them gave me three-dimensionality to the universe. It transformed itself.
It was not a dome over my head. It was a three-dimensional universe that I was suspended in and that was an amazing moment for me. It changed the way I saw the universe and my place in the universe. And it was afforded me through my knowledge and my studies of astronomy and I think that it’s a gift, and I wish it for humanity. I really, really deeply do.

Photo by NASA/ESA/STScI/M.Postman & CLASH team
Just mesmerized with this image of a deconstructed galaxy cluster of RX J1532.9+3021, located about 3.9 billion light years from Earth. Reminds me of this great conversation with Natalie Batalha: 

We don’t get to experience that very often, having this complete dome over your head, which is the universe. But the experience that I had was that I saw the Milky Way arcing through the sky. I saw planets that were in the sky. I think there was a crescent moon that was in the sky. I could see the large and small Magellanic Clouds, which are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way. I saw the Coalsack Nebula, which is this giant molecular cloud between us and the center of the galaxy. I saw all of these things and I knew something about them. I had knowledge of them and this knowledge of them gave me three-dimensionality to the universe. It transformed itself.
It was not a dome over my head. It was a three-dimensional universe that I was suspended in and that was an amazing moment for me. It changed the way I saw the universe and my place in the universe. And it was afforded me through my knowledge and my studies of astronomy and I think that it’s a gift, and I wish it for humanity. I really, really deeply do.

Photo by NASA/ESA/STScI/M.Postman & CLASH team

Just mesmerized with this image of a deconstructed galaxy cluster of RX J1532.9+3021, located about 3.9 billion light years from Earth. Reminds me of this great conversation with Natalie Batalha:

We don’t get to experience that very often, having this complete dome over your head, which is the universe. But the experience that I had was that I saw the Milky Way arcing through the sky. I saw planets that were in the sky. I think there was a crescent moon that was in the sky. I could see the large and small Magellanic Clouds, which are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way. I saw the Coalsack Nebula, which is this giant molecular cloud between us and the center of the galaxy. I saw all of these things and I knew something about them. I had knowledge of them and this knowledge of them gave me three-dimensionality to the universe. It transformed itself.

It was not a dome over my head. It was a three-dimensional universe that I was suspended in and that was an amazing moment for me. It changed the way I saw the universe and my place in the universe. And it was afforded me through my knowledge and my studies of astronomy and I think that it’s a gift, and I wish it for humanity. I really, really deeply do.

Photo by NASA/ESA/STScI/M.Postman & CLASH team

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Some days this song is the quickest route to gratitude.

~ A delightfully mellow rendition of Monty Python by Alexander Stamatis

Just remember that you’re standing on a planet that’s evolving
And revolving at nine hundred miles an hour
That’s orbiting at nineteen miles a second, so it’s reckoned
A sun that is the source of all our power

The sun and you and me and all the stars that we can see
Are moving at a million miles a day
In an outer spiral arm, at forty thousand miles an hour
Of the galaxy we call the ‘milky way’

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A Monday morning astronomy fix from discoverynews:

Hubble Spies ‘UFO’ Galaxy
Good photography is not just about timing. It also depends on good positioning. Case in point? This view of a spiral galaxy, which is fortuitously positioned edge-on relative to the view from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope.
The galaxy, officially known as NGC 2683, was nicknamed the “UFO Galaxy” by astronomers at the Astronaut Memorial Planetarium and Observatory in Cocoa, Fla.
keep reading

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
A Monday morning astronomy fix from discoverynews:

Hubble Spies ‘UFO’ Galaxy
Good photography is not just about timing. It also depends on good positioning. Case in point? This view of a spiral galaxy, which is fortuitously positioned edge-on relative to the view from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope.
The galaxy, officially known as NGC 2683, was nicknamed the “UFO Galaxy” by astronomers at the Astronaut Memorial Planetarium and Observatory in Cocoa, Fla.
keep reading

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

A Monday morning astronomy fix from discoverynews:

Hubble Spies ‘UFO’ Galaxy

Good photography is not just about timing. It also depends on good positioning. Case in point? This view of a spiral galaxy, which is fortuitously positioned edge-on relative to the view from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope.

The galaxy, officially known as NGC 2683, was nicknamed the “UFO Galaxy” by astronomers at the Astronaut Memorial Planetarium and Observatory in Cocoa, Fla.

keep reading

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments