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On Being Tumblr

On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

PopTech is always showcasing some of the coolest things going down (or up in this case?) — like a graffiti mural on a minaret in Tunisia:

Tunisian Calligraffiti artist eL Seed (PopTech 2011) is currently suspended 57 meter in the air, creating Tunisia’s largest Graffiti mural to-date. The mural is being painted on the country’s tallest minaret, during the holy month of Ramadan.

The convergence of art and religion, the centre of much heated debate since the Tunisian elections, is being re-examined in a positive light. Approved by the mosque’s Imam, the 57 meter high mural is promising to be an awe-inspiring landmark, conveying a message of mutual respect, tolerance, and dialogue in a country brimming with countless possibilities.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Walking in Olympia

by Brent Colby, guest contributor

I work and live in Olympia, Washington and love my city. I decided to take a walk on my lunch break and took my camera along.

POE

Phone Booth Tag

Construction Glass

Side Maple

Oly Plate


Brent Colby lives in Olympia, Washington and writes on leadership and culture on his blog.

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Groovy.
From Kevin Grant on USC’s Reporting on Israel Tumblr:

Graffiti in the Baka neighborhood of Jerusalem.
Groovy.
From Kevin Grant on USC’s Reporting on Israel Tumblr:

Graffiti in the Baka neighborhood of Jerusalem.

Groovy.

From Kevin Grant on USC’s Reporting on Israel Tumblr:

Graffiti in the Baka neighborhood of Jerusalem.

Comments
If Jesus Doesn’t Know, Try Google
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Fascinating street commentary on the role of technology, especially Google, in our lives. But, I think this would have been much cooler if it was actually graffitied rather than printed on paper and posted on a pole wall! Non?
[update, 2010.11.04] Wait, I just looked at this photo again. Is this stenciled on?
[9Gag via Gizmodo]
If Jesus Doesn’t Know, Try Google
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Fascinating street commentary on the role of technology, especially Google, in our lives. But, I think this would have been much cooler if it was actually graffitied rather than printed on paper and posted on a pole wall! Non?
[update, 2010.11.04] Wait, I just looked at this photo again. Is this stenciled on?
[9Gag via Gizmodo]

If Jesus Doesn’t Know, Try Google

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Fascinating street commentary on the role of technology, especially Google, in our lives. But, I think this would have been much cooler if it was actually graffitied rather than printed on paper and posted on a pole wall! Non?

[update, 2010.11.04] Wait, I just looked at this photo again. Is this stenciled on?

[9Gag via Gizmodo]

Comments
Words Make Worlds Trent Gilliss, Online Editor  Searching the term “heschel” on Flickr turned up a Heschel-Merton peace protest, some previously published photos of Heschel standing next to MLK at Selma, and a few portraits. And then there’s the image you see here, which puzzled me as I was scanning a list of thumbnails: ‘Why did somebody tag that image with the rabbi’s name?’ The answer was in the caption:The tragedy of religion is partly due to its isolation from life,  as if God could be segregated.Abraham Joshua HeschelThrough this brief caption a gleaning of another person’s mind. These encounters help me to see things differently, to expand my limited scope, as I search for images that encapsulate some kernel of wisdom or sensibility of what’s being discussed in a particular program. I’ve learned to stop and look rather than dismiss and move on.Although this photo won’t make it onto the site, Markus Krisetya, the photographer, opened up another way of seeing Heschel, of finding new meaning in his writings (taken from his 1966 essay “Choose Life!”) and the graffitied bridge I pass by daily. How do you find relevance in Heschel’s words and action?
Words Make Worlds Trent Gilliss, Online Editor  Searching the term “heschel” on Flickr turned up a Heschel-Merton peace protest, some previously published photos of Heschel standing next to MLK at Selma, and a few portraits. And then there’s the image you see here, which puzzled me as I was scanning a list of thumbnails: ‘Why did somebody tag that image with the rabbi’s name?’ The answer was in the caption:The tragedy of religion is partly due to its isolation from life,  as if God could be segregated.Abraham Joshua HeschelThrough this brief caption a gleaning of another person’s mind. These encounters help me to see things differently, to expand my limited scope, as I search for images that encapsulate some kernel of wisdom or sensibility of what’s being discussed in a particular program. I’ve learned to stop and look rather than dismiss and move on.Although this photo won’t make it onto the site, Markus Krisetya, the photographer, opened up another way of seeing Heschel, of finding new meaning in his writings (taken from his 1966 essay “Choose Life!”) and the graffitied bridge I pass by daily. How do you find relevance in Heschel’s words and action?

Words Make Worlds
Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

Searching the term “heschel” on Flickr turned up a Heschel-Merton peace protest, some previously published photos of Heschel standing next to MLK at Selma, and a few portraits. And then there’s the image you see here, which puzzled me as I was scanning a list of thumbnails: ‘Why did somebody tag that image with the rabbi’s name?’

The answer was in the caption:

The tragedy of religion is partly due to its isolation from life,
as if God could be segregated.

Abraham Joshua Heschel

Through this brief caption a gleaning of another person’s mind. These encounters help me to see things differently, to expand my limited scope, as I search for images that encapsulate some kernel of wisdom or sensibility of what’s being discussed in a particular program. I’ve learned to stop and look rather than dismiss and move on.

Although this photo won’t make it onto the site, Markus Krisetya, the photographer, opened up another way of seeing Heschel, of finding new meaning in his writings (taken from his 1966 essay “Choose Life!”) and the graffitied bridge I pass by daily. How do you find relevance in Heschel’s words and action?

Comments