On Being Tumblr

On Being Tumblr

On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Developing a tablet app for On Being is an iterative process. This design set from Pentagram is killing it. A sneak preview for our friends following us on Tumblr.

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If you have two illustrious graphic designers from Pentagram visit Minneapolis, where do you take them if you have an hour to spare? Jean Nouvel’s magnificently designed Guthrie Theater, for one.
And, of course, it was closed for January. Doh! It was a pleasure having Elliott Walker and Emily Oberman visit and work with us in our new offices for a couple of days. Good things are coming!
Where would you have toured?
(via trentgilliss)
If you have two illustrious graphic designers from Pentagram visit Minneapolis, where do you take them if you have an hour to spare? Jean Nouvel’s magnificently designed Guthrie Theater, for one.
And, of course, it was closed for January. Doh! It was a pleasure having Elliott Walker and Emily Oberman visit and work with us in our new offices for a couple of days. Good things are coming!
Where would you have toured?
(via trentgilliss)

If you have two illustrious graphic designers from Pentagram visit Minneapolis, where do you take them if you have an hour to spare? Jean Nouvel’s magnificently designed Guthrie Theater, for one.

And, of course, it was closed for January. Doh! It was a pleasure having Elliott Walker and Emily Oberman visit and work with us in our new offices for a couple of days. Good things are coming!

Where would you have toured?

(via trentgilliss)

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laughingsquid:

Fahrenheit 451 Book Cover With a Match and Striking Paper

This is just plain brilliant. Love the type too.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor
laughingsquid:

Fahrenheit 451 Book Cover With a Match and Striking Paper

This is just plain brilliant. Love the type too.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

laughingsquid:

Fahrenheit 451 Book Cover With a Match and Striking Paper

This is just plain brilliant. Love the type too.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments

The five interlaced rings of the Olympic flag — blue, yellow, black, green, and red — Pierre De Coubertin said in 1931, represent “the five inhabited continents of the world, united by Olympism.” No continent (now region) is assigned a specific color. Perhaps that’s why graphic designer Gustavo Sousa intentionally chose not to provide a legend or key for the illustrations above.

In his illustrations, Mr. Sousa assigns each color of the Olympic rings to a specific continent and then pairs it with a variety of data sets: obesity, gun ownership, McDonald’s outlets, population, homicides, people living with HIV, military expenditures, Facebook users, number of Catholic priests, percentage of homes with televisions, to name a few. He requires the viewer to ponder, to reflect, to think, to make sense of the information.

As Mr. Sousa explained to Fast Company, “The rings represent healthy competition and union, but we know the world isn’t perfect. Maybe understanding the differences is the first step to try to make things more equal.”

Child Mortality in the format of the Olympic rings

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Worship Is Not About Music
by Natalie Albertson, guest contributor
Our sermon this Sunday was on the true meaning of worship. Our worship is small when we reduce it to music: its style, what we like about it, and what we don’t like about it.
Worship Is Not About Music
by Natalie Albertson, guest contributor
Our sermon this Sunday was on the true meaning of worship. Our worship is small when we reduce it to music: its style, what we like about it, and what we don’t like about it.

Worship Is Not About Music

by Natalie Albertson, guest contributor

Our sermon this Sunday was on the true meaning of worship. Our worship is small when we reduce it to music: its style, what we like about it, and what we don’t like about it.

Comments

Shoah: A Table of Elements

by Dov Abramson, guest contributor

Shoah: a Table of Elements

"The trade of chemist (fortified, in my case, by the experience of Auschwitz), teaches you to overcome, indeed to ignore, certain revulsions that are neither necessary nor congenital: matter is matter, neither noble nor vile, infinitely transformable, and its proximate origin is of no importance whatsoever. Nitrogen is nitrogen, it passes miraculously from the air into plants, from these into animals, and from animals into us; when its function in our body is exhausted, we eliminate it, but it still remains nitrogen, aseptic, innocent."
—Primo Levi, The Periodic Table

The Holocaust represented a contradiction in perception: ordered, regimented evil and unrestrained, billowing pain. For decades, artists have sought to capture the ineffable destruction that befell the Jewish people.

"Shoah: A Table of Elements" describes the task of making order of the ungraspable. In so doing, it works to release some of the emotional charge of our most raw subjects, while evoking the more prominent associations of the Holocaust: the gases, the smoke, the debris.

"Shoah: A Table of Elements" is a meditation on how we commit to memory, how we use symbols, and how we represent that which we cannot behold.

שואה: לוח יסודות


Dov AbramsonDov Abramson is founder and creative director of an art and design studio in Jerusalem, Israel. His work combines classic graphic design and branding with independent artistic work that deals with Jewish and Israeli identity. His projects have been featured in Zeek, Forward, Maariv, Haaretz, and the Chicago Tribune, and his art has been exhibited at The Jewish Museum in New York and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

We welcome your original reflections, essays, videos, or news items for possible publication on the On Being Tumblr. Submit your entry through our First Person Outreach page.

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Had to reblog from our beingvisual Tumblr:

There’s beauty and meaning in all sorts of things. But who would’ve thought I’d be posting an image of a chart graphing a periodic table of SEO ranking factors. Signs, signs, everywhere there are signs…
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Had to reblog from our beingvisual Tumblr:

There’s beauty and meaning in all sorts of things. But who would’ve thought I’d be posting an image of a chart graphing a periodic table of SEO ranking factors. Signs, signs, everywhere there are signs…
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Had to reblog from our beingvisual Tumblr:

There’s beauty and meaning in all sorts of things. But who would’ve thought I’d be posting an image of a chart graphing a periodic table of SEO ranking factors. Signs, signs, everywhere there are signs…

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
The Path to Happiness Shubha Bala, associate producer
That flowchart of happiness didn’t fix things for you? Perhaps this one below will guide you to contentment.

(credit-top: Meiklejohn and Alex H/34; bottom: Rick Webb/Flickr)
The Path to Happiness Shubha Bala, associate producer
That flowchart of happiness didn’t fix things for you? Perhaps this one below will guide you to contentment.

(credit-top: Meiklejohn and Alex H/34; bottom: Rick Webb/Flickr)

The Path to Happiness
Shubha Bala, associate producer

That flowchart of happiness didn’t fix things for you? Perhaps this one below will guide you to contentment.

How to be happy if the first didn't work

(credit-top: Meiklejohn and Alex H/34; bottom: Rick Webb/Flickr)

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A Bible for the “Non Card-Carrying Christian” Trent Gilliss, Online Editor
The FontFeed showcased a provocative and, in my opinion, a refreshingly dynamic take on the cover art for a contemporary edition of the Bible. The colors are vibrant and engaging, which reminds people that the Bible is a living text pulsing with lessons for 21st-century readers. And, the depictions of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden are playful and allusive, meant to conjure more questions than to answer them with overly weighty symbolism that would have bogged down the spaciousness of the art work. If you’re interested in opining on what the graphic designers missed or got right, Stand Firm, a blog devoted to “traditional Anglicanism in America,” has an active comment thread worth reading.
As Carl Rush, the founder of the UK-based design agency Crush that created the cover, points out, their intention was to make it the “must have accessory for any non card carrying Christian.” My regret? I can’t find a place where I can actually buy the tome. Help!
Here’s the image unadorned with titling and text. Click for better detail:

(Images courtesy of Crush Design & Art Direction)
A Bible for the “Non Card-Carrying Christian” Trent Gilliss, Online Editor
The FontFeed showcased a provocative and, in my opinion, a refreshingly dynamic take on the cover art for a contemporary edition of the Bible. The colors are vibrant and engaging, which reminds people that the Bible is a living text pulsing with lessons for 21st-century readers. And, the depictions of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden are playful and allusive, meant to conjure more questions than to answer them with overly weighty symbolism that would have bogged down the spaciousness of the art work. If you’re interested in opining on what the graphic designers missed or got right, Stand Firm, a blog devoted to “traditional Anglicanism in America,” has an active comment thread worth reading.
As Carl Rush, the founder of the UK-based design agency Crush that created the cover, points out, their intention was to make it the “must have accessory for any non card carrying Christian.” My regret? I can’t find a place where I can actually buy the tome. Help!
Here’s the image unadorned with titling and text. Click for better detail:

(Images courtesy of Crush Design & Art Direction)

A Bible for the “Non Card-Carrying Christian”
Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

The FontFeed showcased a provocative and, in my opinion, a refreshingly dynamic take on the cover art for a contemporary edition of the Bible. The colors are vibrant and engaging, which reminds people that the Bible is a living text pulsing with lessons for 21st-century readers. And, the depictions of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden are playful and allusive, meant to conjure more questions than to answer them with overly weighty symbolism that would have bogged down the spaciousness of the art work. If you’re interested in opining on what the graphic designers missed or got right, Stand Firm, a blog devoted to “traditional Anglicanism in America,” has an active comment thread worth reading.

As Carl Rush, the founder of the UK-based design agency Crush that created the cover, points out, their intention was to make it the “must have accessory for any non card carrying Christian.” My regret? I can’t find a place where I can actually buy the tome. Help!

Here’s the image unadorned with titling and text. Click for better detail:

42

(Images courtesy of Crush Design & Art Direction)

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