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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Stonehenge’s Long Lost Companion?
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Why is the mystery of Stonehenge and surrounding area so alluring? *Shrug.* But, whenever I see an article about the ancient site, I stop and read. And this time a team of archaeologists from the University of Birmingham have discovered another site, National Geographic reports, not far from Stonehenge that appears to have been used as a ceremonial site for Britons during summer and winter solstices between 2,500 and 2,200 BCE.
How did they do it? Without even picking up a spade:
"…the survey team employed a new, faster method of  surveying beneath the ground using a combination of radar imaging and  magnetometry, a technique that maps changing patterns of magnetism in  the soil.
The new henge was found in just the first two weeks of a  three-year project to map 5.5 square miles (14 square kilometers) of  the Stonehenge landscape.”

Image courtesy of the University of Birmingham

Stonehenge’s Long Lost Companion?

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Why is the mystery of Stonehenge and surrounding area so alluring? *Shrug.* But, whenever I see an article about the ancient site, I stop and read. And this time a team of archaeologists from the University of Birmingham have discovered another site, National Geographic reports, not far from Stonehenge that appears to have been used as a ceremonial site for Britons during summer and winter solstices between 2,500 and 2,200 BCE.

How did they do it? Without even picking up a spade:

"…the survey team employed a new, faster method of surveying beneath the ground using a combination of radar imaging and magnetometry, a technique that maps changing patterns of magnetism in the soil.

The new henge was found in just the first two weeks of a three-year project to map 5.5 square miles (14 square kilometers) of the Stonehenge landscape.”

Image courtesy of the University of Birmingham

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