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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
Some absolutely lovely photos from Postcards from America:

Shukria Diuan, an 85-year-old Christian Iraqi immigrant with her granddaughter, Vian Algailani, Wurzbach Manor, San Antonio, TX. 5/12/11
Alec Soth

reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Some absolutely lovely photos from Postcards from America:

Shukria Diuan, an 85-year-old Christian Iraqi immigrant with her granddaughter, Vian Algailani, Wurzbach Manor, San Antonio, TX. 5/12/11

Alec Soth

reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Tagged: #photo #immigrant
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Dr. Oz’s Mystical Muslim Identity

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

"I’ve struggled a lot with my Muslim identity. … As a Turk growing up in America with one parent from one side of the religious wall and one from the other side, I found myself tugged more and more towards the spiritual side of the religion rather than the legal side of the religion."

Dr. Mehmet Oz at ServiceNation SummitThe popular heart surgeon and television personality Dr. Mehmet Oz is a spiritual man who is hard to classify, religiously speaking. We learned that back in 2004 when we interviewed him. He spoke with Krista at some length about his Muslim faith and about the value he finds in his wife’s Swedenborgian tradition.

But, this excerpt from the PBS series Faces of America with Henry Louis Gates, Jr., digs deeper into Oz’s personal identity by asking about his family’s divergent approaches to Islam. Through Oz’s telling of his own family history, we learn some history about Turkey and its geography, and the immigrant experience in the United States.

Oz’s mother walks in the line of many proud, modern Turks who are secular Muslims, approaching faith as a private practice that is separated or divorced from public and political institutions. Whereas, for his father, religion and law were inseparable and, according to Oz, they were “obviously and beautifully and elegantly integrated.”

Listening to his story, I wonder whether he might be classified as part of the demographic that’s been polled and reported on so much lately: the spiritual but not religious generation.

(photo: Jim Gillooly/PEI/Flickr, licensed under Creative Commons)

[via almaswithinalmas]

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