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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
Ethicality of Profession v. Salary Trent Gilliss, online editor
David McCandless has created this rather provocative infographic for the Guardian's Datablog (click through for larger image). He’s mapped data on public sector salaries in the UK to a 2008 Gallup poll rating honesty and ethical standards of 21 professions in the U.S. (nurses have worn the crown for nine out of the last ten years).
Having lived in Oxford and worked in London for a short while, I’m somewhat suspicious of mapping opinions of what Americans perceive to be the ethicality of professions to the actual professions of UK subjects. But, it’s fun to think about and talk over with your friends and colleagues.
I have to admit my solar plexus is aching a bit when I see that journalists are tightly clumped with bankers, attorneys, plumbers, and real estate agents on the low end of the respectability quadrant. At least stock brokers and savvy politicians make a better living wage for having “similar” moral integrity. Perhaps I should be a fireman or a high school teacher…
And your observations?
Ethicality of Profession v. Salary Trent Gilliss, online editor
David McCandless has created this rather provocative infographic for the Guardian's Datablog (click through for larger image). He’s mapped data on public sector salaries in the UK to a 2008 Gallup poll rating honesty and ethical standards of 21 professions in the U.S. (nurses have worn the crown for nine out of the last ten years).
Having lived in Oxford and worked in London for a short while, I’m somewhat suspicious of mapping opinions of what Americans perceive to be the ethicality of professions to the actual professions of UK subjects. But, it’s fun to think about and talk over with your friends and colleagues.
I have to admit my solar plexus is aching a bit when I see that journalists are tightly clumped with bankers, attorneys, plumbers, and real estate agents on the low end of the respectability quadrant. At least stock brokers and savvy politicians make a better living wage for having “similar” moral integrity. Perhaps I should be a fireman or a high school teacher…
And your observations?

Ethicality of Profession v. Salary
Trent Gilliss, online editor

David McCandless has created this rather provocative infographic for the Guardian's Datablog (click through for larger image). He’s mapped data on public sector salaries in the UK to a 2008 Gallup poll rating honesty and ethical standards of 21 professions in the U.S. (nurses have worn the crown for nine out of the last ten years).

Having lived in Oxford and worked in London for a short while, I’m somewhat suspicious of mapping opinions of what Americans perceive to be the ethicality of professions to the actual professions of UK subjects. But, it’s fun to think about and talk over with your friends and colleagues.

I have to admit my solar plexus is aching a bit when I see that journalists are tightly clumped with bankers, attorneys, plumbers, and real estate agents on the low end of the respectability quadrant. At least stock brokers and savvy politicians make a better living wage for having “similar” moral integrity. Perhaps I should be a fireman or a high school teacher…

And your observations?

Comments
Maps of Sin Trent Gilliss, online editor
The infographic above from this month’s Wired Magazine plots per-capita statistics of specified sets of data with the seven deadly sins — wrath is a compilation of violent crime numbers while gluttony is paired with the concentration of fast-food joints.
Naturally, your eye is drawn to where you live. In some cases, it is a cold, hard dose of reality. In others, it’s about what I expected. We’re located in Minnesota, so I found myself generally nodding in agreement.
But, if you’re like me and are a transplant from another state (in my case North Dakota), you revisit home and wondered why you ever left there — greed, wrath, envy, lust, pride — or realize exactly what drove you away — sloth (we NoDaks are an overly pragmatic bunch of home-dwellers).
Draw any conclusions yourself? Enlighten us and leave a comment!
(source: Kansas State University Geography/USACE)
Maps of Sin Trent Gilliss, online editor
The infographic above from this month’s Wired Magazine plots per-capita statistics of specified sets of data with the seven deadly sins — wrath is a compilation of violent crime numbers while gluttony is paired with the concentration of fast-food joints.
Naturally, your eye is drawn to where you live. In some cases, it is a cold, hard dose of reality. In others, it’s about what I expected. We’re located in Minnesota, so I found myself generally nodding in agreement.
But, if you’re like me and are a transplant from another state (in my case North Dakota), you revisit home and wondered why you ever left there — greed, wrath, envy, lust, pride — or realize exactly what drove you away — sloth (we NoDaks are an overly pragmatic bunch of home-dwellers).
Draw any conclusions yourself? Enlighten us and leave a comment!
(source: Kansas State University Geography/USACE)

Maps of Sin
Trent Gilliss, online editor

The infographic above from this month’s Wired Magazine plots per-capita statistics of specified sets of data with the seven deadly sins — wrath is a compilation of violent crime numbers while gluttony is paired with the concentration of fast-food joints.

Naturally, your eye is drawn to where you live. In some cases, it is a cold, hard dose of reality. In others, it’s about what I expected. We’re located in Minnesota, so I found myself generally nodding in agreement.

But, if you’re like me and are a transplant from another state (in my case North Dakota), you revisit home and wondered why you ever left there — greed, wrath, envy, lust, pride — or realize exactly what drove you away — sloth (we NoDaks are an overly pragmatic bunch of home-dwellers).

Draw any conclusions yourself? Enlighten us and leave a comment!

(source: Kansas State University Geography/USACE)

Comments
A Matrix of Science and Religion
by Colleen Scheck, producer
Science historian Robert Crease evaluated responses to a 2008 Physics World survey that asked, “Which of the following reflects your views on science and religion?” He found he could place them in this matrix.
(via Science and Religion Today)
A Matrix of Science and Religion
by Colleen Scheck, producer
Science historian Robert Crease evaluated responses to a 2008 Physics World survey that asked, “Which of the following reflects your views on science and religion?” He found he could place them in this matrix.
(via Science and Religion Today)

A Matrix of Science and Religion

by Colleen Scheck, producer

Science historian Robert Crease evaluated responses to a 2008 Physics World survey that asked, “Which of the following reflects your views on science and religion?” He found he could place them in this matrix.

(via Science and Religion Today)

Comments