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On Being Tumblr

On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Filmmaker Wes Anderson talks The Grand Budapest HotelMarcel Proust, and Francois Truffaut at NYPL Live with the lively mind of Paul Holdengraber:

"Almost every Truffaut movie is his adaptation of a book he loves. And, his movies are filled with books. I share that affection for books, just even as objects as well as great stories."

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Joseph Campbell. His writings on semiotics, comparative religion and mythology (in particular ‘The Power of Myth’ and ‘The Hero With a Thousand Faces’) helped inspire the framework on which I built my character Robert Langdon. The PBS interview series with Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers was hands down the most thought-provoking conversation I’ve ever witnessed. Campbell’s breadth of knowledge about the origins of religious belief enabled him to respond with clarity and logic to some very challenging questions about contradictions inherent in faith, religion, and scripture. I remember admiring Campbell’s matter-of-fact responses and wanting my own character Langdon to project that same respectful understanding when faced with complex spiritual issues.
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Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code, in response to being asked about the one writer he could meet, dead or alive, during an interview for The New York Times Sunday Book Review.

Of all the people he could meet, I must admit that I’m rather surprised to see it is JC.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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theantidote:

Harper Lee letter to fan auctioned today
(via thelifeguardlibrarian:)

Classic reply.
theantidote:

Harper Lee letter to fan auctioned today
(via thelifeguardlibrarian:)

Classic reply.
Comments
laughingsquid:

Fahrenheit 451 Book Cover With a Match and Striking Paper

This is just plain brilliant. Love the type too.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor
laughingsquid:

Fahrenheit 451 Book Cover With a Match and Striking Paper

This is just plain brilliant. Love the type too.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

laughingsquid:

Fahrenheit 451 Book Cover With a Match and Striking Paper

This is just plain brilliant. Love the type too.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
"I have found it easier to identify with the characters who verge upon hysteria, who were frightened of life, who were desperate to reach out to another person…they have a certain appearance of fragility, but they are really strong."
~Tennessee Williams, from Conversations with Tennessee Williams
 Photo by Emmanuele Contini / Flickr, cc by-nc-sa 2.0
"I have found it easier to identify with the characters who verge upon hysteria, who were frightened of life, who were desperate to reach out to another person…they have a certain appearance of fragility, but they are really strong."
~Tennessee Williams, from Conversations with Tennessee Williams
 Photo by Emmanuele Contini / Flickr, cc by-nc-sa 2.0

"I have found it easier to identify with the characters who verge upon hysteria, who were frightened of life, who were desperate to reach out to another person…they have a certain appearance of fragility, but they are really strong."

~Tennessee Williams, from Conversations with Tennessee Williams

 Photo by Emmanuele Contini / Flickr, cc by-nc-sa 2.0

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"Water does not resist. Water flows. When you plunge your hand into it, all you feel is a caress. Water is not a solid wall, it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it. Water is patient. Dripping water wears away a stone.
Remember that, my child. Remember you are half water. If you can’t go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does.”
~Margaret Atwood, The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus
Photo by Courtney Carmody/Flickr, cc by 2.0
"Water does not resist. Water flows. When you plunge your hand into it, all you feel is a caress. Water is not a solid wall, it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it. Water is patient. Dripping water wears away a stone.
Remember that, my child. Remember you are half water. If you can’t go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does.”
~Margaret Atwood, The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus
Photo by Courtney Carmody/Flickr, cc by 2.0

"Water does not resist. Water flows. When you plunge your hand into it, all you feel is a caress. Water is not a solid wall, it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it. Water is patient. Dripping water wears away a stone.

Remember that, my child. Remember you are half water. If you can’t go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does.”

~Margaret Atwood, The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus

Photo by Courtney Carmody/Flickr, cc by 2.0

Comments
“When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty, I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”
~C.S. Lewis, On Stories: And Other Essays in Literature
Photo by Lucinda Lovering/Flickr, cc by-nd 2.0
“When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty, I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”
~C.S. Lewis, On Stories: And Other Essays in Literature
Photo by Lucinda Lovering/Flickr, cc by-nd 2.0

“When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty, I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”

~C.S. Lewis, On Stories: And Other Essays in Literature

Photo by Lucinda Lovering/Flickr, cc by-nd 2.0

Comments
"An artist must be free to choose what he does, certainly, but he must also never be afraid to do what he must choose."
~Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 - May 22, 1967)
From The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain
Photo by Jack Delano, Library of Congress
"An artist must be free to choose what he does, certainly, but he must also never be afraid to do what he must choose."
~Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 - May 22, 1967)
From The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain
Photo by Jack Delano, Library of Congress

"An artist must be free to choose what he does, certainly, but he must also never be afraid to do what he must choose."

~Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 - May 22, 1967)

From The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain

Photo by Jack Delano, Library of Congress

Comments
Poetry is for me Eucharistic. You take someone else’s suffering into your body, their passion comes into your body, and in doing that you commune, you take communion, you make a community with others.
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Mary Karr from her 2010 interview with Judy Valente on PBS’ Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.

(via trentgilliss)

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"For there is nothing heavier than compassion. Not even one’s own pain weighs so heavy as the pain one feels with someone, for someone, a pain intensified by the imagination."
~Milan Kundera from The Unbearable Lightness of Being
Listen to: Compassion’s Edge States: Roshi Joan Halifax on Caring Better
Photo Hartwig HKD
"For there is nothing heavier than compassion. Not even one’s own pain weighs so heavy as the pain one feels with someone, for someone, a pain intensified by the imagination."
~Milan Kundera from The Unbearable Lightness of Being
Listen to: Compassion’s Edge States: Roshi Joan Halifax on Caring Better
Photo Hartwig HKD

"For there is nothing heavier than compassion. Not even one’s own pain weighs so heavy as the pain one feels with someone, for someone, a pain intensified by the imagination."

~Milan Kundera from The Unbearable Lightness of Being

Listen to: Compassion’s Edge States: Roshi Joan Halifax on Caring Better

Photo Hartwig HKD

Comments
trentgilliss:

It’s hard for a client not to fall in love with Pentagram when I receive this magnificent chapbook of cowboy poetry. Giddy-up!

Boy, does this give us ideas for our own work!
trentgilliss:

It’s hard for a client not to fall in love with Pentagram when I receive this magnificent chapbook of cowboy poetry. Giddy-up!

Boy, does this give us ideas for our own work!

trentgilliss:

It’s hard for a client not to fall in love with Pentagram when I receive this magnificent chapbook of cowboy poetry. Giddy-up!

Boy, does this give us ideas for our own work!

Comments
trentgilliss:

Considering ways we could make chapbooks like this one from Graywolf Press for On Being. We receive so many pieces of lyrical work from people and this digestible, elegant format would be perfect. William Drenttel, call me?
trentgilliss:

Considering ways we could make chapbooks like this one from Graywolf Press for On Being. We receive so many pieces of lyrical work from people and this digestible, elegant format would be perfect. William Drenttel, call me?

trentgilliss:

Considering ways we could make chapbooks like this one from Graywolf Press for On Being. We receive so many pieces of lyrical work from people and this digestible, elegant format would be perfect. William Drenttel, call me?

Comments
A hearty congratulations to our hometown author, Louise Erdrich, who won this year’s National Book Award in fiction for The Round House! She also owns a fabulous local bookstore in a quaint neighborhood outside downtown Minneapolis. It’s called Birchbark Books. Check it out! 
nationalbook:

2012 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNERS:
Young People’s Literature:  William Alexander, Goblin Secrets  (Margaret K. McElderry Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)
Poetry:  David Ferry, Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations (University of Chicago Press)
Nonfiction: Katherine Boo, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity  (Random House)
 Fiction: Louise Erdrich, The Round House (Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)
Details from the evening here.
A hearty congratulations to our hometown author, Louise Erdrich, who won this year’s National Book Award in fiction for The Round House! She also owns a fabulous local bookstore in a quaint neighborhood outside downtown Minneapolis. It’s called Birchbark Books. Check it out! 
nationalbook:

2012 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNERS:
Young People’s Literature:  William Alexander, Goblin Secrets  (Margaret K. McElderry Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)
Poetry:  David Ferry, Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations (University of Chicago Press)
Nonfiction: Katherine Boo, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity  (Random House)
 Fiction: Louise Erdrich, The Round House (Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)
Details from the evening here.

A hearty congratulations to our hometown author, Louise Erdrich, who won this year’s National Book Award in fiction for The Round House! She also owns a fabulous local bookstore in a quaint neighborhood outside downtown Minneapolis. It’s called Birchbark Books. Check it out!

nationalbook:

2012 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNERS:


Young People’s Literature:
William Alexander, Goblin Secrets
(Margaret K. McElderry Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)


Poetry:
David Ferry, Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations
(University of Chicago Press)


Nonfiction:
Katherine Boo, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity
(Random House)


Fiction:

Louise Erdrich, The Round House (Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)


Details from the evening here.

Tagged: #literature
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After that last post, how could I resist following it up with Patrick Stewart reciting Sonnet 29.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments

I am sooooo getting this iPad app. Ruth Negga reading Shakespeare’s Sonnet 114:

Or whether doth my mind, being crowned with you,
Drink up the monarch’s plague, this flattery?
Or whether shall I say mine eye saith true,
And that your love taught it this alchemy,
To make of monsters and things indigest…

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments