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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Tonight! SOF Live from Washington, D.C.

Trent Gilliss, online editor


Watch the live video stream in this post or chat with others while you watch on our SOF Live page.

Monday, April 5th, 2010 (7pm Eastern)
The Shakespeare Theatre Company
610 F Street Northwest
Washington, D.C.

Beginning at 6:30pm Eastern tonight, we’ll be opening up the live video stream of a sold-out public event with Krista and Michel Martin, host of NPR’s Tell Me More. These two journalists will be discussing the role of faith in their lives and the interplay between science and religions, using Einstein’s “cosmic religious sense” as a starting point.

We’d love to hear your thoughts about this conversation. Please add your comments here.

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Live Audio: Evolving Faith - Meaning, Ethics, and Ideas

Trent Gilliss, online editor

Live Event at Fourth Presbyterian Church in ChicagoListen here, live at 7 pm Central! (caveat: you probably won’t hear anything until 10 minutes prior to start time)!

Well, Krista’s in Chicago tonight — and she’ll be on the receiving end of the conversation this time.

Eboo Patel, founder of Interfaith Youth Core, will lead the discussion and will ask Krista about the surprises and discoveries she has made as religion has moved from the sidelines to the forefront of world affairs.

We’d love to hear your comments whether you were seated in the church or are listening from home or the office. Submit your comments here.

(photo: Kate Moos)

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The Still(s) of an Evening Event

DuBois and Krista onstage

Colleen Scheck, Producer

We decided late in our planning stages for our event with Joshua DuBois that we wanted a professional photographer there. When I asked Tony Bol, APM’s director of live event programs, for a recommendation, I didn’t even have the full sentence out of my mouth before he said “Ann Marsden.” Now I know why. Ann, a Minneapolis-based photographer, took some stunning pictures of our evening at the Fitzgerald Theater.

After it was all over, I stood on the Fitz stage wondering how everything had gone. I had been running around so much during the event, making sure x,y,z details happened as planned (and adjusting when it didn’t), that I hardly had a sense of if the event went well overall. But when I look at Ann’s photos, I don’t recall the frenzy of the evening; instead, I’m filled with a quiet, intimate sense of the power of convening community, the value of connection through public conversation, and the beauty of performance.  Here’s some of my favorite pics:

Krista Tippett and Joshua DuBois

Krista in action, gesturing with her hands. We often get media requests for these kinds of photos, so I’m sure this one will come in handy in the future.

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Laughter. Everyone works hard - host and guest alike - to pull off a live event. And our conversations have a lot of weight at times. Lighter moments are lovely, too.

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Audience = Inform. Inspire. Entertain. It’s what we do, who we serve.

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A great photographer creates intimacy in crowded moments.  An example.

DuBois speaking at reception

…and has an eye for capturing VIPs both in and out of the frame.

Fitzgerald Theater

The Fitz at dusk - a sense of place, a landmark.

DuBois signing Fitz wall

Every guest at the Fitzgerald Theater is invited to sign the brick wall behind the stage.  Yes, you guessed it - this is NOT an Ann Marsden photo.  This is an attempt by yours truly to capture some behind-the-scenes action.  Intimacy and beauty lost…must take photography classes…(Sigh).

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Referencing Abortion in the President’s Speech at Notre Dame
Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

President Obama’s recent speech at the University of Notre Dame commencement ceremony came up several times during our live event with Joshua DuBois at the Fitz — from Krista during the interview and from our online and in-house audiences during the Q+A session.

The president addressed several divisive issues — including abortion, a topic we’ve been working at reframing by asking for your perspectives and stories on how you and others might engage in this dialogue in ways not yet imagined. Specifically, Krista asked DuBois if he had a hand in writing the speech. His answer was rather indirect, saying something to the effect that the president faces difficult issues “head on” and that his speeches are in the president’s voice.

President Obama’s address garnered a fair amount of attention for his choice of place in talking about such a controversial issues. Was this the appropriate venue for this discussion? I’m not sure, but I like that the administration isn’t avoiding it. I’m hopeful that more fruitful ways of talking about this hot-button issue are on the horizon.

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Live Video: SOF Salon on Lived Faith and Civic Life

Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

Update: The streaming embed box has been replaced with the recorded versions of the salon, broken into two parts.

This is the place where we are streaming real-time video of Krista and a group of 15 listeners reflecting on the previous night’s conversation with Joshua DuBois. We’ll begin streaming at 8:45 am CST. The Speaking of Faith Salon begins at 9:00 am and will last approximately an hour.

We are asking the participants to ponder these questions coming into the discussion:

  • How are you being called to engage in your various communities?
  • What forms of action are you drawn to?
  • How is faith-based initiative work relevant, or is it at all?

We welcome your participation and feedback:

  • Watch.
  • Comment.
  • Twitter. Respond to points and topics with a tweet — or ask a question. We’ll feature your tweets on our Web site. The hashtag is #sofsalon.

There is still time to sign up so we can send you details and reminders about watching live video of Krista’s conversation with Joshua DuBois this Wednesday!

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Live Video: Religious Life in the Obama Era

Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

Update: The streaming embed box has been replaced with the recorded versions of the interview, broken into two parts.

This is the place where we are streaming real-time video of Krista and Joshua DuBois’ conversation on Wednesday, May 20th. We’ll begin streaming at 6:45 pm CST with pre-show music through the instrumentation of guitar, oud, and violin. The conversation begins at 7:00.

Their conversation will focus on the changing face of religion in public life in the era of the Obama administration and the perspective DuBois brings through his new role as head of the White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships.

A Q+A session, moderated by Larry Jacobs of the University of Minnesota Humphrey Institute, will follow the conversation. The evening will begin with pre-show music of Robert Bell and David Stenshoel, providing some European/American influenced jazz through the instrumentation of guitar, oud, and violin.

Help us cover this event. Whether you live in the Twin Cities metro area or on another continent, you can participate by:

  • Watching and Commenting. Submit your questions here, and we’ll ask them during the Q+A session.
  • Twittering the Conversation. Respond to Krista or Dubois’ points with a tweet — or ask a question. We’ll feature your tweets on our Web site. The hashtag is #sofevent.
  • Participating in a Salon. We’re selecting eight people to be part of a roundtable discussion with Krista and DuBois the next morning. If you live in the metro area, let us know if you’re interested. If you live elsewhere, we’ll inform you on how you can take part in the discussion through our live video feed.

Sign up and share your ideas with us!

ABOUT THE GUEST
Joshua DuBois heads the White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships. The former associate pastor, advisor to President Obama, and Obama’s campaign Director of Religious Affairs, DuBois is charged with bringing people together around common goals regardless of political affiliation. DuBois received his undergraduate degree in political science from Boston University in 2003 and a master’s in public affairs from Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School. He suspended his pursuit of a J.D. at the Georgetown University Law Center to join Obama’s campaign.

ABOUT THE EVENT
Religious Life in the Obama Era: A Conversation with Joshua DuBois is Wednesday, May 20th at the historic Fitzgerald Theater at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $20 for the general public and $18 for MPR members. All seats are reserved seating. For tickets, please call the box office at 651-290-1221. This event is being recorded for national broadcast. Broadcast date, May 28, 2009.

Comments
From the Background to the StageTrent Gilliss, Online Editor
In the photo above, President Obama signs the proclamation marking May 7, 2009 as the National Day of Prayer. In the background: Joshua DuBois, director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. If you haven’t heard, Krista will be interviewing DuBois for a live, public event at the Fitzgerald Theater in Saint Paul on May 20th (get the details here). But, just because you don’t live in Minnesota doesn’t mean you can’t attend and participate in the event!
We’ve opened up our production process (Krista’s unedited interviews, video of editorial sessions, blogs, First Person projects), but I’ve been remiss about not being able to share live events in real time — to share the magical energy of an event as it happens. We experimented with streaming video, unadvertised, with the Jean Vanier interview; it worked. We streamed Krista’s virtual conference with a class at American University; it worked. Then our connection flopped during the Brooks-Dionne event at Georgetown.
But, this time we’re in our environs. All the connections and pipes can be checked and double-checked. So we’re pushing forward with real-time video of Krista and DuBois’ conversation on our Web site (or embed it on your own blog). But, we need your participation to consider this a success. Ask questions and make comments as it happens, and I’ll make sure they get into the hands of our producers for consideration. Some will be asked by Krista on stage, crediting you. Or simply talk about it on Twitter (#sofevent) about ideas or points that you find interesting.
Please welcome others in your communities to attend. If you need any materials (posters, graphics, URLs, etc.), please let us know. Drop us a line. And, if you live in the Twin Cities metro area, we’re still looking for attendees for our salon with Krista the morning after!
(photo: Pete Souza/White House)
From the Background to the StageTrent Gilliss, Online Editor
In the photo above, President Obama signs the proclamation marking May 7, 2009 as the National Day of Prayer. In the background: Joshua DuBois, director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. If you haven’t heard, Krista will be interviewing DuBois for a live, public event at the Fitzgerald Theater in Saint Paul on May 20th (get the details here). But, just because you don’t live in Minnesota doesn’t mean you can’t attend and participate in the event!
We’ve opened up our production process (Krista’s unedited interviews, video of editorial sessions, blogs, First Person projects), but I’ve been remiss about not being able to share live events in real time — to share the magical energy of an event as it happens. We experimented with streaming video, unadvertised, with the Jean Vanier interview; it worked. We streamed Krista’s virtual conference with a class at American University; it worked. Then our connection flopped during the Brooks-Dionne event at Georgetown.
But, this time we’re in our environs. All the connections and pipes can be checked and double-checked. So we’re pushing forward with real-time video of Krista and DuBois’ conversation on our Web site (or embed it on your own blog). But, we need your participation to consider this a success. Ask questions and make comments as it happens, and I’ll make sure they get into the hands of our producers for consideration. Some will be asked by Krista on stage, crediting you. Or simply talk about it on Twitter (#sofevent) about ideas or points that you find interesting.
Please welcome others in your communities to attend. If you need any materials (posters, graphics, URLs, etc.), please let us know. Drop us a line. And, if you live in the Twin Cities metro area, we’re still looking for attendees for our salon with Krista the morning after!
(photo: Pete Souza/White House)

From the Background to the Stage
Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

In the photo above, President Obama signs the proclamation marking May 7, 2009 as the National Day of Prayer. In the background: Joshua DuBois, director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. If you haven’t heard, Krista will be interviewing DuBois for a live, public event at the Fitzgerald Theater in Saint Paul on May 20th (get the details here). But, just because you don’t live in Minnesota doesn’t mean you can’t attend and participate in the event!

We’ve opened up our production process (Krista’s unedited interviews, video of editorial sessions, blogs, First Person projects), but I’ve been remiss about not being able to share live events in real time — to share the magical energy of an event as it happens. We experimented with streaming video, unadvertised, with the Jean Vanier interview; it worked. We streamed Krista’s virtual conference with a class at American University; it worked. Then our connection flopped during the Brooks-Dionne event at Georgetown.

But, this time we’re in our environs. All the connections and pipes can be checked and double-checked. So we’re pushing forward with real-time video of Krista and DuBois’ conversation on our Web site (or embed it on your own blog). But, we need your participation to consider this a success. Ask questions and make comments as it happens, and I’ll make sure they get into the hands of our producers for consideration. Some will be asked by Krista on stage, crediting you. Or simply talk about it on Twitter (#sofevent) about ideas or points that you find interesting.

Please welcome others in your communities to attend. If you need any materials (posters, graphics, URLs, etc.), please let us know. Drop us a line. And, if you live in the Twin Cities metro area, we’re still looking for attendees for our salon with Krista the morning after!

(photo: Pete Souza/White House)

Comments
A Pipeline to Nowhere Trent Gilliss, Online Editor
More than a year ago Krista, Mitch, and I drove to rural Maryland for an interview with Jean Vanier. When we arrived I assumed we would be setting up in a retreat center with modern amenities. Nope. We were directed to a small, old farmhouse that had been converted for group meetings. It wasn’t much, but most of the power outlets worked, and it had a weak wireless signal.
'Why not experiment and stream the interview live?' I thought. Krista was game and Mitch was cool with it too (although you can hear an occasional squawk in the audio from me tip-toeing between the two cameras). We hadn't promoted it and there probably wouldn't be much of an audience, if any.
As many of you know, weak wireless often means a drop in signal at times and uploading anything crawls. I was sure our test balloon was going to fail. It didn’t; we piped the full 90 minutes through a free third-party service without a glitch. And, we did the same for Krista’s interview with Columba Stewart in the heart of Marcel Breuer’s concrete walls with another weak WiFi signal.
You know where this is leading. Me making excuses. That’s right.
When I found out Krista would be interviewing David Brooks and E.J. Dionne in a well-equipped auditorium on the campus of a major university, I was convinced this was an opportunity to give our audience a front-row seat for a high-profile event. I promoted the live discussion in our e-mail newsletter; I created an event on Facebook and invited all our SOF group members to attend in person or online; I tweeted about it (@trentgilliss). People showed a healthy amount of interest.
The auditorium was lovely, and, as luck would have it, I was able to get a wired Ethernet cable for a dedicated connection for streaming. Then I lost one of my cameras (the downside of sharing equipment), but I thought, ‘well, at least we’re doing a live stream.’ For five hours before the event, I tested the connection. Success. Uninterrupted video streaming. Then the doors opened.
For five minutes, we were piping high-quality video of the conversation while the crowd filed in and took there seats. Then it dropped. I’m receiving tweets from colleagues; viewers start asking what happened on the blog; my wife phones me. I’m frantic trying to switch to the wireless connection, which was also at a dead halt. Georgetown’s Internet connection was so slow that loading the front page of The New York Times took nearly 10 minutes — without the images loading.
In the end, I failed. I let down our audience and I hate doing that. All I can do is apologize and say we’ll do better next time.
I needed a back-up plan, but I’m still not certain what that is without spending some cash. Cash that we don’t have. If you have any suggestions, I’m game on hearing how others work or ways of making this happen. Post your comments here. And, if you want to let me have it, post your comments here too.
(photo: Marc Zielinski for Speaking of Faith)
A Pipeline to Nowhere Trent Gilliss, Online Editor
More than a year ago Krista, Mitch, and I drove to rural Maryland for an interview with Jean Vanier. When we arrived I assumed we would be setting up in a retreat center with modern amenities. Nope. We were directed to a small, old farmhouse that had been converted for group meetings. It wasn’t much, but most of the power outlets worked, and it had a weak wireless signal.
'Why not experiment and stream the interview live?' I thought. Krista was game and Mitch was cool with it too (although you can hear an occasional squawk in the audio from me tip-toeing between the two cameras). We hadn't promoted it and there probably wouldn't be much of an audience, if any.
As many of you know, weak wireless often means a drop in signal at times and uploading anything crawls. I was sure our test balloon was going to fail. It didn’t; we piped the full 90 minutes through a free third-party service without a glitch. And, we did the same for Krista’s interview with Columba Stewart in the heart of Marcel Breuer’s concrete walls with another weak WiFi signal.
You know where this is leading. Me making excuses. That’s right.
When I found out Krista would be interviewing David Brooks and E.J. Dionne in a well-equipped auditorium on the campus of a major university, I was convinced this was an opportunity to give our audience a front-row seat for a high-profile event. I promoted the live discussion in our e-mail newsletter; I created an event on Facebook and invited all our SOF group members to attend in person or online; I tweeted about it (@trentgilliss). People showed a healthy amount of interest.
The auditorium was lovely, and, as luck would have it, I was able to get a wired Ethernet cable for a dedicated connection for streaming. Then I lost one of my cameras (the downside of sharing equipment), but I thought, ‘well, at least we’re doing a live stream.’ For five hours before the event, I tested the connection. Success. Uninterrupted video streaming. Then the doors opened.
For five minutes, we were piping high-quality video of the conversation while the crowd filed in and took there seats. Then it dropped. I’m receiving tweets from colleagues; viewers start asking what happened on the blog; my wife phones me. I’m frantic trying to switch to the wireless connection, which was also at a dead halt. Georgetown’s Internet connection was so slow that loading the front page of The New York Times took nearly 10 minutes — without the images loading.
In the end, I failed. I let down our audience and I hate doing that. All I can do is apologize and say we’ll do better next time.
I needed a back-up plan, but I’m still not certain what that is without spending some cash. Cash that we don’t have. If you have any suggestions, I’m game on hearing how others work or ways of making this happen. Post your comments here. And, if you want to let me have it, post your comments here too.
(photo: Marc Zielinski for Speaking of Faith)

A Pipeline to Nowhere
Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

More than a year ago Krista, Mitch, and I drove to rural Maryland for an interview with Jean Vanier. When we arrived I assumed we would be setting up in a retreat center with modern amenities. Nope. We were directed to a small, old farmhouse that had been converted for group meetings. It wasn’t much, but most of the power outlets worked, and it had a weak wireless signal.

'Why not experiment and stream the interview live?' I thought. Krista was game and Mitch was cool with it too (although you can hear an occasional squawk in the audio from me tip-toeing between the two cameras). We hadn't promoted it and there probably wouldn't be much of an audience, if any.

As many of you know, weak wireless often means a drop in signal at times and uploading anything crawls. I was sure our test balloon was going to fail. It didn’t; we piped the full 90 minutes through a free third-party service without a glitch. And, we did the same for Krista’s interview with Columba Stewart in the heart of Marcel Breuer’s concrete walls with another weak WiFi signal.

You know where this is leading. Me making excuses. That’s right.

When I found out Krista would be interviewing David Brooks and E.J. Dionne in a well-equipped auditorium on the campus of a major university, I was convinced this was an opportunity to give our audience a front-row seat for a high-profile event. I promoted the live discussion in our e-mail newsletter; I created an event on Facebook and invited all our SOF group members to attend in person or online; I tweeted about it (@trentgilliss). People showed a healthy amount of interest.

The auditorium was lovely, and, as luck would have it, I was able to get a wired Ethernet cable for a dedicated connection for streaming. Then I lost one of my cameras (the downside of sharing equipment), but I thought, ‘well, at least we’re doing a live stream.’ For five hours before the event, I tested the connection. Success. Uninterrupted video streaming. Then the doors opened.

For five minutes, we were piping high-quality video of the conversation while the crowd filed in and took there seats. Then it dropped. I’m receiving tweets from colleagues; viewers start asking what happened on the blog; my wife phones me. I’m frantic trying to switch to the wireless connection, which was also at a dead halt. Georgetown’s Internet connection was so slow that loading the front page of The New York Times took nearly 10 minutes — without the images loading.

In the end, I failed. I let down our audience and I hate doing that. All I can do is apologize and say we’ll do better next time.

I needed a back-up plan, but I’m still not certain what that is without spending some cash. Cash that we don’t have. If you have any suggestions, I’m game on hearing how others work or ways of making this happen. Post your comments here. And, if you want to let me have it, post your comments here too.

(photo: Marc Zielinski for Speaking of Faith)

Comments

UPDATE: I’ll be posting footage to this entry over the weekend as soon as I get the session audio.

UPDATE: I apologize for these technical problems. The bandwidth at the venue came to a screeching halt and has precluded us from streaming live. I’ll post our tape as soon as I can. Thank you, and let me have it. Trent

Live Video: Krista with David Brooks and E.J. Dionne
Trent Gilliss, Online Editor

At 6:30 pm Eastern today, we will be streaming Krista’s live public interview with New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne — all live from the campus of Georgetown University. For those of you in Washington D.C., there’s still time to attend the event in person. For those of you who can’t, the best place to watch the conversation is right here at SOF Observed.

The topic of conversation is the legacy of Reinhold Niebuhr and the future of his idea of Christian realism. I’m excited — and prepared to be surprised — to hear where Krista directs this topic as the U.S. shifts gear during a new presidential administration.

I got a preview of Niebuhr’s relevance during our morning briefing (actually, a confab with coffee and pastries). Krista has been reading one of Niebuhr’s later works, The Irony of American History. Part of his book addresses the very real threat of communism of the day. But, Niebuhr warns, that the virtuous founding principles of the United States — simplicity, rugged individualism, frugality, modesty, faith — has lead to the country’s success and great wealth. This prosperity comes at a cost of abandoning some of what made the U.S. great; the threat is to wield such power and might with humility.

I’m also opening up the chat dialog that accompanies this live feed so that you can share ideas with others who may be watching with you. Please let me know what you think of this endeavor. We really do this for the many of you who can’t attend these events in person. It’s a great honor for me and I love to get feedback, even criticism so we can serve you better.

Comments