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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
An incredible series of photographs by Kenro Izu of Cambodia’s undiscovered ancient temples. The one above, Prasat Neang Khmau, was built in the tenth century and “is also known as the Temple of the Black Lady—its name perhaps alludes to Kali, the dark goddess of destruction.”
(via condenasttraveler)
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

An incredible series of photographs by Kenro Izu of Cambodia’s undiscovered ancient temples. The one above, Prasat Neang Khmau, was built in the tenth century and “is also known as the Temple of the Black Lady—its name perhaps alludes to Kali, the dark goddess of destruction.”

(via condenasttraveler)

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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"I picked up a camera in journalism class, and it was truly spiritual."
— Ann Marsden

May she rest in peace.

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Adore that kameelahwrites is still packing analog:

Bag of film for upstate. Sleep, reading, and lots of creating….soon come (Taken with Instagram)

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Adore that kameelahwrites is still packing analog:

Bag of film for upstate. Sleep, reading, and lots of creating….soon come (Taken with Instagram)

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Jane Goodall at the Halki Summit
Over the course of three days on the island of Heybeliada across from Istanbul, our host Krista Tippett moderated a plethora of panels at the Halki Summit on Global Responsibility & Environmental Sustainability. One of the keynote speakers we found so endearing was primatologist Jane Goodall, whom may give Justin Bieber or Bono a run for his money in the world of superstar fandom. It seems that there was no one present who wasn’t captivated by her presence.
We recorded her keynote address and will try to make the audio available later this week.
Photo by Trent Gilliss

Jane Goodall at the Halki Summit

Over the course of three days on the island of Heybeliada across from Istanbul, our host Krista Tippett moderated a plethora of panels at the Halki Summit on Global Responsibility & Environmental Sustainability. One of the keynote speakers we found so endearing was primatologist Jane Goodall, whom may give Justin Bieber or Bono a run for his money in the world of superstar fandom. It seems that there was no one present who wasn’t captivated by her presence.

We recorded her keynote address and will try to make the audio available later this week.

Photo by Trent Gilliss

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trishutchinson:

‘Viagra Falls, Ringaskiddy’ showing currently at the RHA Gallery. My first gallery showing of the work……

Congratulations! We’re great admirers of Tristan’s work, and encourage of you who might be in Dublin to see his show.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

trishutchinson:

Viagra Falls, Ringaskiddy’ showing currently at the RHA Gallery. My first gallery showing of the work……

Congratulations! We’re great admirers of Tristan’s work, and encourage of you who might be in Dublin to see his show.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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What Would You Be Willing to Sacrifice?

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

"This project isn’t about making images. It’s not about creating the world’s largest camera. It’s about doing what you love. If you had been searching your whole life for something you love, what would you be willing to sacrifice?" ~Ian Ruhter, from Silver & Light

I can’t remember watching something so heartbreakingly gorgeous, unswerving in its emotional sway, inspirational to the point of forcing me to wonder about my current station in life. What am I doing here?

(h/t Chris Heagle)

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"Entering the forest without moving the grass; Entering the water without raising a ripple.” —Alan Watts, from Tao: The Watercourse Way
Photo by Frank Wuestefeld
(h/t to Elsan Zimmerly)

"Entering the forest without moving the grass;
Entering the water without raising a ripple.”
Alan Watts, from Tao: The Watercourse Way

Photo by Frank Wuestefeld

(h/t to Elsan Zimmerly)

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usagov:

It’s spring! The magnolias are in bloom on the Capitol grounds.
Photo by the Architect of the Capitol

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

usagov:

It’s spring! The magnolias are in bloom on the Capitol grounds.

Photo by the Architect of the Capitol

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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A Face That Looks Like You: Matthew Septimus and the Protestors of Occupy Wall Street

As the Occupy movement wanes, its protestors brought issues of economic inequality to the forefront of our national political discourse. On Being looks back at the protestors driven out of Zuccotti Park in November and the faces that look like you.

by Nancy Rosenbaum, producer

Greetings From Zuccotti ParkAs the Occupy Wall Street movement took root, Brooklyn-based photographer Matthew Septimus found himself visiting Zuccotti Park as much as possible. Now in his 50s, Septimus says he’s no stranger to protest movements, but describes his experience of Occupy Wall Street as “something different.” The people he encountered were open, trusting, and eager to have a conversation.

Walking into the park for the first time, Septimus remembers being overwhelmed by a wave of emotion and kept going back for more:

"The thing that resonated was the civility and genuine interest. All are willing to look me in the eye and acknowledge my existence. Not all is peace and love. But on the whole, the community is positive and committed. Finally people are speaking up. And I am engaged, too. It feels good to see people having a conversation."

Over the course of several months, Septimus generated over 1,200 images documenting the scores of people who were drawn to Lower Manhattan to experience the energy and potential of the OWS phenomenon.

Using a vintage Rolleiflex camera, Septimus crafted intimate portraits revealing people’s humanity, diversity, and complexity. “The protester,” as seen through Septimus’ lens, flies in the face of stereotypes. His photographs challenge us to see them more completely.

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A powerful image from theamericannow:

Take a closer look at this photo…
Photographer and Vietnam vet Joe Cantrell took this photo of a crane lowering The Three Soldiers — the statue positioned near the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. — into position. He snapped the photo on a visit to D.C. in 1984.
“It has had very strong effects on other vets who’ve seen it,” he says about the image, which he thinks of as a sort of self portrait. It also evokes, for him, “a multiple crucifixion” or a lynching. “The elephant in the room,” he says, “is the way we vets were treated here by our own people.”
Cantrell sent the photo and shared his thoughts in response to my Public Insight Network query, sparked by the previously unseen photographs from Vietnam just published by Newsweek. You can see more of Joe’s photos here. (Posted by Jeff Severns Guntzel. 3.21.12)

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

A powerful image from theamericannow:

Take a closer look at this photo…

Photographer and Vietnam vet Joe Cantrell took this photo of a crane lowering The Three Soldiers — the statue positioned near the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. — into position. He snapped the photo on a visit to D.C. in 1984.

“It has had very strong effects on other vets who’ve seen it,” he says about the image, which he thinks of as a sort of self portrait. It also evokes, for him, “a multiple crucifixion” or a lynching. “The elephant in the room,” he says, “is the way we vets were treated here by our own people.”

Cantrell sent the photo and shared his thoughts in response to my Public Insight Network query, sparked by the previously unseen photographs from Vietnam just published by Newsweek. You can see more of Joe’s photos here(Posted by Jeff Severns Guntzel. 3.21.12)

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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"Good things come from a quiet place: study, prayer, music, transformation, worship, communion. The words ‘peace’ and ‘quiet’ are all but synonymous, and are often spoken in the same breath. A quiet place is the think tank of the soul, the spawning ground of truth and beauty.
A quiet place outdoors has no physical borders or limits to perception. One can commonly hear for miles and listen even farther. A quiet place affords a sanctuary for the soul, where the difference between right and wrong becomes more readily apparent. It is a place to feel the love that connects all things, large and small, human and not; a place where presence of a tree can be heard. A quiet place is a place to open up all your senses and come alive.” —Gordon Hempton, from One Square Inch of Silence

About the photo: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park by Eden Politte/Flickr, cc by-nc 2.0
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

"Good things come from a quiet place: study, prayer, music, transformation, worship, communion. The words ‘peace’ and ‘quiet’ are all but synonymous, and are often spoken in the same breath. A quiet place is the think tank of the soul, the spawning ground of truth and beauty.

A quiet place outdoors has no physical borders or limits to perception. One can commonly hear for miles and listen even farther. A quiet place affords a sanctuary for the soul, where the difference between right and wrong becomes more readily apparent. It is a place to feel the love that connects all things, large and small, human and not; a place where presence of a tree can be heard. A quiet place is a place to open up all your senses and come alive.”
Gordon Hempton, from One Square Inch of Silence

About the photo: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park by Eden Politte/Flickr, cc by-nc 2.0

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
Anonymous asked:
Recently there was news story about a new technique being used in photograpy; the new method allows a digital picture to be taken. Later it can be downloaded on the computer and focused on different points. The name of the process starts with the letter "N". Can you tell me the name of this new process?

Good morning, Anon—

Although this is definitely not our area of expertise (we do news through the lens of theology, human experience, and storytelling), I actually know what you’re asking about. The technology is called plenoptic, or light field, photography. Joshua Topolsky describes it this way in his review of the Lytro camera for The Washington Post:

"When normal cameras take a photo, they measure the color and light coming through the lens to produce an image. The Lytro camera not only sees color and light but can understand the direction the light moves in while snapping a photo.

Instead of simply grabbing one point of the light in a scene, Lytro analyzes all the points of light and then converts them to data. Once the image is stored, it can be processed and reprocessed after the photo is taken.

What does this mean, exactly?

Basically, it means that you’re able to take a photo and then refocus the subject in it after the fact. It means that if you take a picture of a friend in the foreground and there’s something exciting happening down the street, you can use Lytro’s custom software to refocus on the background, or almost anything else in the scene that you captured. It’s hard to explain, but it’s amazing.”

You can see how this works and play around with images on Lytro’s photo gallery. Check out these examples in which I changed the depth of field by first focusing on the near and then focusing on the distant end of the tree, with one click:

Lytro (focal point near)Lytro (focal point far)

The resolution of the photos has a long way to go. It’s rather poor, but apparently there’s hope. Here’s Eric Cheng, the director of photography at Lytro, explaining the technology and the company’s new camera.

Hope this helps!
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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For all you lovers of ponies, these pictures from the guardian of Astro stuck in the Australian beach mud will get you in the genechtagaoink. And, the outcome:

The incredible story of one woman’s loyalty to her horse – she spent three hours holding its head above the tide after it got stuck in the mud on a beach in Australia. More here

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

For all you lovers of ponies, these pictures from the guardian of Astro stuck in the Australian beach mud will get you in the genechtagaoink. And, the outcome:

The incredible story of one woman’s loyalty to her horse – she spent three hours holding its head above the tide after it got stuck in the mud on a beach in Australia. More here

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments

Walking in Olympia

by Brent Colby, guest contributor

I work and live in Olympia, Washington and love my city. I decided to take a walk on my lunch break and took my camera along.

POE

Phone Booth Tag

Construction Glass

Side Maple

Oly Plate


Brent Colby lives in Olympia, Washington and writes on leadership and culture on his blog.

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