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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

"Entering the forest without moving the grass; Entering the water without raising a ripple.” —Alan Watts, from Tao: The Watercourse Way
Photo by Frank Wuestefeld
(h/t to Elsan Zimmerly)

"Entering the forest without moving the grass;
Entering the water without raising a ripple.”
Alan Watts, from Tao: The Watercourse Way

Photo by Frank Wuestefeld

(h/t to Elsan Zimmerly)

Comments
usagov:

It’s spring! The magnolias are in bloom on the Capitol grounds.
Photo by the Architect of the Capitol

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

usagov:

It’s spring! The magnolias are in bloom on the Capitol grounds.

Photo by the Architect of the Capitol

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments

A Face That Looks Like You: Matthew Septimus and the Protestors of Occupy Wall Street

As the Occupy movement wanes, its protestors brought issues of economic inequality to the forefront of our national political discourse. On Being looks back at the protestors driven out of Zuccotti Park in November and the faces that look like you.

by Nancy Rosenbaum, producer

Greetings From Zuccotti ParkAs the Occupy Wall Street movement took root, Brooklyn-based photographer Matthew Septimus found himself visiting Zuccotti Park as much as possible. Now in his 50s, Septimus says he’s no stranger to protest movements, but describes his experience of Occupy Wall Street as “something different.” The people he encountered were open, trusting, and eager to have a conversation.

Walking into the park for the first time, Septimus remembers being overwhelmed by a wave of emotion and kept going back for more:

"The thing that resonated was the civility and genuine interest. All are willing to look me in the eye and acknowledge my existence. Not all is peace and love. But on the whole, the community is positive and committed. Finally people are speaking up. And I am engaged, too. It feels good to see people having a conversation."

Over the course of several months, Septimus generated over 1,200 images documenting the scores of people who were drawn to Lower Manhattan to experience the energy and potential of the OWS phenomenon.

Using a vintage Rolleiflex camera, Septimus crafted intimate portraits revealing people’s humanity, diversity, and complexity. “The protester,” as seen through Septimus’ lens, flies in the face of stereotypes. His photographs challenge us to see them more completely.

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A powerful image from theamericannow:

Take a closer look at this photo…
Photographer and Vietnam vet Joe Cantrell took this photo of a crane lowering The Three Soldiers — the statue positioned near the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. — into position. He snapped the photo on a visit to D.C. in 1984.
“It has had very strong effects on other vets who’ve seen it,” he says about the image, which he thinks of as a sort of self portrait. It also evokes, for him, “a multiple crucifixion” or a lynching. “The elephant in the room,” he says, “is the way we vets were treated here by our own people.”
Cantrell sent the photo and shared his thoughts in response to my Public Insight Network query, sparked by the previously unseen photographs from Vietnam just published by Newsweek. You can see more of Joe’s photos here. (Posted by Jeff Severns Guntzel. 3.21.12)

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

A powerful image from theamericannow:

Take a closer look at this photo…

Photographer and Vietnam vet Joe Cantrell took this photo of a crane lowering The Three Soldiers — the statue positioned near the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. — into position. He snapped the photo on a visit to D.C. in 1984.

“It has had very strong effects on other vets who’ve seen it,” he says about the image, which he thinks of as a sort of self portrait. It also evokes, for him, “a multiple crucifixion” or a lynching. “The elephant in the room,” he says, “is the way we vets were treated here by our own people.”

Cantrell sent the photo and shared his thoughts in response to my Public Insight Network query, sparked by the previously unseen photographs from Vietnam just published by Newsweek. You can see more of Joe’s photos here(Posted by Jeff Severns Guntzel. 3.21.12)

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments

"Good things come from a quiet place: study, prayer, music, transformation, worship, communion. The words ‘peace’ and ‘quiet’ are all but synonymous, and are often spoken in the same breath. A quiet place is the think tank of the soul, the spawning ground of truth and beauty.
A quiet place outdoors has no physical borders or limits to perception. One can commonly hear for miles and listen even farther. A quiet place affords a sanctuary for the soul, where the difference between right and wrong becomes more readily apparent. It is a place to feel the love that connects all things, large and small, human and not; a place where presence of a tree can be heard. A quiet place is a place to open up all your senses and come alive.” —Gordon Hempton, from One Square Inch of Silence

About the photo: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park by Eden Politte/Flickr, cc by-nc 2.0
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

"Good things come from a quiet place: study, prayer, music, transformation, worship, communion. The words ‘peace’ and ‘quiet’ are all but synonymous, and are often spoken in the same breath. A quiet place is the think tank of the soul, the spawning ground of truth and beauty.

A quiet place outdoors has no physical borders or limits to perception. One can commonly hear for miles and listen even farther. A quiet place affords a sanctuary for the soul, where the difference between right and wrong becomes more readily apparent. It is a place to feel the love that connects all things, large and small, human and not; a place where presence of a tree can be heard. A quiet place is a place to open up all your senses and come alive.”
Gordon Hempton, from One Square Inch of Silence

About the photo: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park by Eden Politte/Flickr, cc by-nc 2.0

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
Anonymous asked:
Recently there was news story about a new technique being used in photograpy; the new method allows a digital picture to be taken. Later it can be downloaded on the computer and focused on different points. The name of the process starts with the letter "N". Can you tell me the name of this new process?

Good morning, Anon—

Although this is definitely not our area of expertise (we do news through the lens of theology, human experience, and storytelling), I actually know what you’re asking about. The technology is called plenoptic, or light field, photography. Joshua Topolsky describes it this way in his review of the Lytro camera for The Washington Post:

"When normal cameras take a photo, they measure the color and light coming through the lens to produce an image. The Lytro camera not only sees color and light but can understand the direction the light moves in while snapping a photo.

Instead of simply grabbing one point of the light in a scene, Lytro analyzes all the points of light and then converts them to data. Once the image is stored, it can be processed and reprocessed after the photo is taken.

What does this mean, exactly?

Basically, it means that you’re able to take a photo and then refocus the subject in it after the fact. It means that if you take a picture of a friend in the foreground and there’s something exciting happening down the street, you can use Lytro’s custom software to refocus on the background, or almost anything else in the scene that you captured. It’s hard to explain, but it’s amazing.”

You can see how this works and play around with images on Lytro’s photo gallery. Check out these examples in which I changed the depth of field by first focusing on the near and then focusing on the distant end of the tree, with one click:

Lytro (focal point near)Lytro (focal point far)

The resolution of the photos has a long way to go. It’s rather poor, but apparently there’s hope. Here’s Eric Cheng, the director of photography at Lytro, explaining the technology and the company’s new camera.

Hope this helps!
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
For all you lovers of ponies, these pictures from the guardian of Astro stuck in the Australian beach mud will get you in the genechtagaoink. And, the outcome:

The incredible story of one woman’s loyalty to her horse – she spent three hours holding its head above the tide after it got stuck in the mud on a beach in Australia. More here

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

For all you lovers of ponies, these pictures from the guardian of Astro stuck in the Australian beach mud will get you in the genechtagaoink. And, the outcome:

The incredible story of one woman’s loyalty to her horse – she spent three hours holding its head above the tide after it got stuck in the mud on a beach in Australia. More here

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments

Walking in Olympia

by Brent Colby, guest contributor

I work and live in Olympia, Washington and love my city. I decided to take a walk on my lunch break and took my camera along.

POE

Phone Booth Tag

Construction Glass

Side Maple

Oly Plate


Brent Colby lives in Olympia, Washington and writes on leadership and culture on his blog.

Comments
Good gosh is this photo series incredibly cool. Be sure and click through to the photo of one female ninja running up a wall; Spider-Man beware. These images of empowered women in Muslim countries are a welcome relief to so many of the newswire images published nowadays.
From the guardian:

Photograph: CAREN FIROUZ/Reuters
See more images of Iran’s female ninjas - many women in Iran have found a novel way to express themselves: training in the arts of the ninja warrior

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Good gosh is this photo series incredibly cool. Be sure and click through to the photo of one female ninja running up a wall; Spider-Man beware. These images of empowered women in Muslim countries are a welcome relief to so many of the newswire images published nowadays.

From the guardian:

Photograph: CAREN FIROUZ/Reuters

See more images of Iran’s female ninjas - many women in Iran have found a novel way to express themselves: training in the arts of the ninja warrior

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
Just lovely, timelightbox:

Yevgeniy and Lyubov Kissin
Three years ago, Lauren Fleishman began photographing couples who have been married for more than 50 years in an attempt to document romantic histories. See more here.

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Just lovely, timelightbox:

Yevgeniy and Lyubov Kissin

Three years ago, Lauren Fleishman began photographing couples who have been married for more than 50 years in an attempt to document romantic histories. See more here.

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
"Oh flock of heavenly cranes, cover us with your wings." ~From a traditional Japanese prayer, which Hiroshima victim Sadako Sasaki’s mother read to her daughter while the young girl was battling leukemia. Sadako’s dream was to create 1,000 origami cranes to be healed; she folded 644.
Photo by Frau Bob. (Follow “onbeing” on instagram)

"Oh flock of heavenly cranes, cover us with your wings." ~From a traditional Japanese prayer, which Hiroshima victim Sadako Sasaki’s mother read to her daughter while the young girl was battling leukemia. Sadako’s dream was to create 1,000 origami cranes to be healed; she folded 644.

Photo by Frau Bob. (Follow “onbeing” on instagram)

Comments

Bourbon Barrels in a Plantation Home

by Susan Leem, associate producer

Basement, Four bbls of hard liquorBarrels of the Vann House basement.

While researching the Chief Vann House in Chatsworth, Georgia, we happened upon these vivid images of bourbon barrels in the basement of the historic Cherokee plantation home. A hearty thanks to photographer John A. Lees, who was kind enough to permit us to use his photos in a slideshow for our recent show "Toward Living Memory" with Tiya Miles.

BBl endsThe barrels read “Sour Mash Bourbon Whisky 1787” vintage even at the turn of the 18th century.

Card table, refreshments, and a weapon on displayAmusements at the Vann House.

Comments
OK. It’s Friday and I’m not even a dog lover, but this suave pooch exposes this dog liker’s weaknesses. Perhaps he could offer a few fashion pointers to this urban cowboy?
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

OK. It’s Friday and I’m not even a dog lover, but this suave pooch exposes this dog liker’s weaknesses. Perhaps he could offer a few fashion pointers to this urban cowboy?

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
Sultan Ahmet Mosque, Istanbul
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Turkey is most definitely on our brains. As it turns out, we’ll be making a production trip in June (yay!) and so the extensive planning begins. What to do, what to do! No sooner did we find out than our old friend and former guest Omid Safi posted this magnificent photograph on his Facebook page along with this waxing caption: 

"Inside sacred sites like this, I know it’s true that ‘God is beautiful, and loves beauty.’ The imaginative Muslim architects who designed it emulated Christian Byzantine masters, and strived to create a space that would stand free from columns. The "opening" that was created inside, the Christians and the Muslims agreed together, was to be filled by the very presence of God. By God, they succeeded."

If you have suggestions on stories we might cover that fit our mission or voices that you think we ought to expose to a North American audience, please offer your suggestions in the comments section. Enjoy the view!

Sultan Ahmet Mosque, Istanbul

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Turkey is most definitely on our brains. As it turns out, we’ll be making a production trip in June (yay!) and so the extensive planning begins. What to do, what to do! No sooner did we find out than our old friend and former guest Omid Safi posted this magnificent photograph on his Facebook page along with this waxing caption: 

"Inside sacred sites like this, I know it’s true that ‘God is beautiful, and loves beauty.’ The imaginative Muslim architects who designed it emulated Christian Byzantine masters, and strived to create a space that would stand free from columns. The "opening" that was created inside, the Christians and the Muslims agreed together, was to be filled by the very presence of God. By God, they succeeded."

If you have suggestions on stories we might cover that fit our mission or voices that you think we ought to expose to a North American audience, please offer your suggestions in the comments section. Enjoy the view!

Comments