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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.

Thank goodness for Reuters:

A white rose is placed on barbed wire at the museum of the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz Birkenau marking the 67th anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust, in Auschwitz Birkenau January 27, 2012. [REUTERS/Kacper Pempel]

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Thank goodness for Reuters:

A white rose is placed on barbed wire at the museum of the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz Birkenau marking the 67th anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust, in Auschwitz Birkenau January 27, 2012. [REUTERS/Kacper Pempel]

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Anonymous asked:
I've got my black socks. I've got my sandles. I've got my stretchy pants pulled half way up my chest, and I don't care what anyone thinks. Aww, man. This is heaven, it really is. What do you think?

Dear Anonymous—

This, is heavenly.

Vatican Museum

This, is not.

The new socks and sandals?

This, is heavenly.

Southall, London, England - School playground

This, is not.

Sandals + bags + newspaper

This, is heavenly.

Stepping out . . .

This, is not.

Kogans053

This, is heavenly.

Geyser Lookout Nevada 2

This, is not.

Sandals with socks

And these, well, it depends on your seasonal desires…

Down by the Water Trough

…and if you’re a cat lover.

Variegated

Thanks for indulging me,
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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The Echoing Silence of Your Mind

by Hudson Gardner, guest contributor

Separating oneself from the natural, real world is like uprooting a plant,
putting it in sandy soil,
watering it only to keep it alive:

you may find yourself growing,

and living,

and acting,

but there will always be something beyond,
another sort of subtleness,

Read More

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Jeff Harris: 4,748 Self-Portraits and Counting

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

The trajectory of this man’s story and the scenes shared will leave you simultaneously inspired and devastated. What a life!

(h/t Kate Moos + The Rumpus)

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The Three Christmases of the Holy Land

by Taline Voskeritchian, guest contributor

Iraqi Christian Girls Sing in AmmanIraqi Christian girls attend Christmas Mass at Chaldean Catholic Church in Amman, Jordan on December 25, 2011. (photo: Ali Jarekji/Reuters)

In the lands between the Mediterranean and the Jordan River, the first of three Christmas celebrations was on December 24, the Christmas of the English, or so we thought of it then in the years of my adolescence. My family — ethnic Armenians, Christians by subscription more than piety — had settled in Jordan, a largely Muslim country, where I grew into adulthood, pulled this way and that by the three Christmases of the Holy Land. Of course it was a misnomer to call it the Christmas of the English because December 24 was celebrated by Catholic and Protestant Arabs as well.

In those days, in the 1950s and 1960s, the Middle East was a very different place from what it has become of late. Unlike the Christians of Iraq today, we had little fear, did not hide our religious affiliation but did not brag about it either. In the Holy Land of those times, celebrations of Christmas were for us and Muslims, at least at our post-colonial school which had been run for many years by English missionaries; it had a mixed student body of Christians and Muslims.

For me, the home of the English Christmas was the Ahliyyah School for Girls, which I attended after third grade and all the way to the end. The Ahliyyah, which is still a thriving school, was the successor to the Christian Missionary School, whose British headmistress was whisked away in the wake of the 1956 Suez Canal Crisis. The school’s name was changed, as well as the board. The Christmas celebrations persisted.

Read More

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Convent in Cuzco
by Molly Fessler, guest contributor
Rumi wrote, “When you do things from your soul, you feel a river moving in you, a joy.”
Several years ago I had the opportunity to travel to Latin America, and I took this picture in Cuzco, Peru, where in the courtyard of an old convent, a flower blooms. Walking through the gardens, watching the sun fall through the abbey — joy.
Molly Fessler is a sophomore at Bryn Mawr College, studying sociology and peace studies.

Convent in Cuzco

by Molly Fessler, guest contributor

Rumi wrote, “When you do things from your soul, you feel a river moving in you, a joy.”

Several years ago I had the opportunity to travel to Latin America, and I took this picture in Cuzco, Peru, where in the courtyard of an old convent, a flower blooms. Walking through the gardens, watching the sun fall through the abbey — joy.


Molly Fessler is a sophomore at Bryn Mawr College, studying sociology and peace studies.

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Illuminating Maine’s Deep Winter with Light Sculptures

by Nancy Rosenbaum, producer

Castle in the Park - Deering Oaks Park - Portland, Maine"Castle in the Park" at Deering Oaks Park in Portland, Maine. (photo: David LaCasse)

The holidays are over and there’s no getting around the fact that it’s January and bitter cold in the Upper Midwest. The days, while inching longer into light, are still short. Now is the time of deep winter, when a touch of light goes a long way.

Last week, as I caught a glimpse of holiday lights being dismantled from an indoor public tree display, I thought, “Already? It’s not even New Year’s. Now’s the time when we need the light the most.”

The good people of Portland, Maine understand this need in their watery bones. From Thanksgiving through Valentine’s Day, the city is bedecked in glorious light sculptures designed by local artist Pandora LaCasse. For over a decade, Ms. LaCasse has been transforming public parks and buildings into canvases for her light art.   

Along the Pond  Deering Oaks"Along the Pond" at Deering Oaks Park in Portland, Maine. (photo: David LaCasse)

Ms. LaCasse, a native of Maine, says that place matters in her work and that the state’s landscape inspires her creativity. As she told one interviewer, “I’m always trying to get the essence of a place. I think people like the lights because it’s the middle of winter and they respond to the color and light. And it’s accessible.”

Tommy's Park - Portland, Maine
Tommy’s Park in Portland, Maine. (photo: David LaCasse)

The Candelabra - Deering Oaks Park - Portland, Maine"The Candelabra" at Deering Oaks Park, Portland, Maine. (photo: David LaCasse)

Cascading Spheres Maine College of Art, Portland, Maine"Cascading Spheres" adorn the face of the Maine College of Art in Portland, Maine. (photo: David LaCasse)

Ms. LaCasse’s color-drenched creations feature abstract shapes found in nature, like teardrops and orbs. They’re not the stuff of Santa, candy canes, and the nativity. I once lived in Maine and now make my home in Saint Paul, Minnesota where my neighbors festoon their homes with holiday lights. As much as I admire these wintry displays, I do so as a non-Christian outsider, who’s observing them from afar. Pandora’s lights were different. I could love them without feeling excluded. They were a balm for my soul in deep winter and I miss them.

Longfellow Square - Portland, MaineLongfellow Square in Portland, Maine. (photo: David LaCasse)

Little Diamond Island - MaineLittle Diamond Island. (photo: David LaCasse)

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Nature’s Menorah
by Daniel Johnson, guest contributor
This picture reminds me of a menorah, with the milkweed pods representing tongues of fire and the sunlit trees in the background strengthening the fire imagery. We are midway through the Festival of Lights, which is also known as Hanukkah. This festival is represented by the menorah, a candle holder with 9 branches.
Daniel Johnson is a community volunteer and former executive director of Kinship of Greater Minneapolis, a faith-based mentoring program for kids in need. You can see more of his photography at Savoring Servant.

Nature’s Menorah

by Daniel Johnson, guest contributor

This picture reminds me of a menorah, with the milkweed pods representing tongues of fire and the sunlit trees in the background strengthening the fire imagery. We are midway through the Festival of Lights, which is also known as Hanukkah. This festival is represented by the menorah, a candle holder with 9 branches.


Daniel Johnson is a community volunteer and former executive director of Kinship of Greater Minneapolis, a faith-based mentoring program for kids in need. You can see more of his photography at Savoring Servant.

Comments
Oh, this sentiment is so lovely. Yes, we here at On Being are romantics… Thanks for this, guardian:

Rituals around the world
Here’s a selection of runner up photos for Guardian Travel’s competition. Click through the gallery to see which one judge Natalie Mayer picked to win a £200 Point101 voucher.
In this picture: Melanie Barrow, runner-up: This photo was taken at N Seoul Tower which overlooks the South Korean capital. It is said that if two partners lock their love together along the towers fence line, and throw away the key, it will seal their love forever.

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Oh, this sentiment is so lovely. Yes, we here at On Being are romantics… Thanks for this, guardian:

Rituals around the world

Here’s a selection of runner up photos for Guardian Travel’s competition. Click through the gallery to see which one judge Natalie Mayer picked to win a £200 Point101 voucher.

In this picture: Melanie Barrow, runner-up: This photo was taken at N Seoul Tower which overlooks the South Korean capital. It is said that if two partners lock their love together along the towers fence line, and throw away the key, it will seal their love forever.

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
washingtonpoststyle:

Nativity set made of bacon, sausage, sauerkraut.
Via WhyIsMarko.com, which has 26 other holy creations.

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

washingtonpoststyle:

Nativity set made of bacon, sausage, sauerkraut.

Via WhyIsMarko.com, which has 26 other holy creations.

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments

Light Painting the Mines of North Wales

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

If you’re looking for a brief respite between Thanksgiving meals or a brief interlude to the NFL triple play, check out this short film by Andrew Telling and Owen Richards. They shadow photographer Robin Friend as he traverses the foothills of North Wales and descends into an abandoned Victorian mine at Cwmorthin to do a bit of light painting for his Slaughterhouse series:

"Slaughterhouse" by Robin Friend"Although my mind kept wandering and playing tricks, it would always return to the absence of the men that used to work here. Their presence was palpable; this was their mine and I was trespassing. Each cathedral-sized cavern would have been leased and worked by one family. Grandfathers, fathers, sons, uncles, and nephews would have worked side-by-side, day in day out. These dark passages, steep crevasses, and sheer drops would have been their livelihood. This was their world. They would have spent the majority of their lives down here in the dark with nothing but a candle to illuminate the slate and their spirits."

(h/t trishutchinson)

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The National Archives’ todaysdocument delivers with some incredible color photography celebrating the passing of light.

Leaf Peeping

On this fall weekend - enjoy some lovely fall color from the Environmental Protection Agency.

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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The River Is Everywhere at Once
An untitled photo inspired by a saying of the Buddha by Tanisha Pina.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

The River Is Everywhere at Once

An untitled photo inspired by a saying of the Buddha by Tanisha Pina.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments