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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
A woman and a girl wash at a tap at a temporary displacement camp set up next to a Kurdish checkpoint on June 13, 2014 in Kalak, Iraq. Found this photo while editing Jeffrey Kaplan’s piece on the Sunni-Shi’itie showdown, "The Iraqi Fall of Saigon?"
(Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
A woman and a girl wash at a tap at a temporary displacement camp set up next to a Kurdish checkpoint on June 13, 2014 in Kalak, Iraq. Found this photo while editing Jeffrey Kaplan’s piece on the Sunni-Shi’itie showdown, "The Iraqi Fall of Saigon?"
(Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

A woman and a girl wash at a tap at a temporary displacement camp set up next to a Kurdish checkpoint on June 13, 2014 in Kalak, Iraq. Found this photo while editing Jeffrey Kaplan’s piece on the Sunni-Shi’itie showdown, "The Iraqi Fall of Saigon?"

(Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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trentgilliss:

It’s been a delight to see my vision for our office space + studio come to life in inspired ways — imagined and yet to be determined. This week we hosted a dinner and conversation with the Brookings Institution’s managing director Bill Antholis.
Follow that up in two weeks with a live public event for The Civil Conversations Project (to be aired on national public radio) tentatively followed by a reception with the former Archbishop of Canterbury (for realz) and St. Mark’s Cathedral. Then a few weeks later, we’re hosting a co-sponsored event with Sarah Lutman on communal singing, which is then followed by hosting two art projects in conjunction with Northern Spark, a dusk-to-dawn festival with Ragamala Dance Theater on honoring Rabindranath Tagore and a project we’re calling Your Audio Selfie!
Very exciting. Stop by sometime!
trentgilliss:

It’s been a delight to see my vision for our office space + studio come to life in inspired ways — imagined and yet to be determined. This week we hosted a dinner and conversation with the Brookings Institution’s managing director Bill Antholis.
Follow that up in two weeks with a live public event for The Civil Conversations Project (to be aired on national public radio) tentatively followed by a reception with the former Archbishop of Canterbury (for realz) and St. Mark’s Cathedral. Then a few weeks later, we’re hosting a co-sponsored event with Sarah Lutman on communal singing, which is then followed by hosting two art projects in conjunction with Northern Spark, a dusk-to-dawn festival with Ragamala Dance Theater on honoring Rabindranath Tagore and a project we’re calling Your Audio Selfie!
Very exciting. Stop by sometime!

trentgilliss:

It’s been a delight to see my vision for our office space + studio come to life in inspired ways — imagined and yet to be determined. This week we hosted a dinner and conversation with the Brookings Institution’s managing director Bill Antholis.

Follow that up in two weeks with a live public event for The Civil Conversations Project (to be aired on national public radio) tentatively followed by a reception with the former Archbishop of Canterbury (for realz) and St. Mark’s Cathedral. Then a few weeks later, we’re hosting a co-sponsored event with Sarah Lutman on communal singing, which is then followed by hosting two art projects in conjunction with Northern Spark, a dusk-to-dawn festival with Ragamala Dance Theater on honoring Rabindranath Tagore and a project we’re calling Your Audio Selfie!

Very exciting. Stop by sometime!

Comments
A meeting of the minds at the University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs. Larry Jacobs, Bill Antholis, and Krista Tippett have a vibrant discussion about our pluralistic life in America, and abroad. What Bill is concerned about embracing in our public life? “The sacredness of the mind.”
A meeting of the minds at the University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs. Larry Jacobs, Bill Antholis, and Krista Tippett have a vibrant discussion about our pluralistic life in America, and abroad. What Bill is concerned about embracing in our public life? “The sacredness of the mind.”

A meeting of the minds at the University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs. Larry Jacobs, Bill Antholis, and Krista Tippett have a vibrant discussion about our pluralistic life in America, and abroad. What Bill is concerned about embracing in our public life? “The sacredness of the mind.”

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There is little doubt that the news media amplify and exacerbate social and political divisions. Too often, journalists follow a ‘Noah’s Ark’ approach to coverage in which a strong liberal is paired with a vocal conservative in an ideological food fight. The result is polarization of discourse and ‘false equivalence’ in reporting. This lack of nuanced analysis confuses viewers and makes it difficult for them to sort out the contrasting facts and opinions. People get the sense that there are only two policy options and that there are few gradations or complexities in the positions that are reported.
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From the Brookings report, "Nudging News Producers and Consumers Toward More Thoughtful, Less Polarized Discourse," by Darrell West and Beth Stone. A worthy read.

This is a tension we’ve experienced first-hand when programming live events for The Civil Conversations Project. We’ve been questioned by producers and journalists in public radio news rooms about our guest choices for conversations on gay marriage and abortion. But, there have also been some really wonderful advocates, newsroom managers like Chris Worthington of Minnesota Public Radio too.

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The National Women’s Law Center published this clickable map that allows you to see:
The share of minimum wage workers who are women
The next scheduled increase in the minimum wage
Any recent action on the minimum wage in the state legislature
It looks like my home state of North Dakota has an even split of men and women as minimum wage earners.
~Trent Gilliss, executive editor
The National Women’s Law Center published this clickable map that allows you to see:
The share of minimum wage workers who are women
The next scheduled increase in the minimum wage
Any recent action on the minimum wage in the state legislature
It looks like my home state of North Dakota has an even split of men and women as minimum wage earners.
~Trent Gilliss, executive editor

The National Women’s Law Center published this clickable map that allows you to see:

  • The share of minimum wage workers who are women
  • The next scheduled increase in the minimum wage
  • Any recent action on the minimum wage in the state legislature

It looks like my home state of North Dakota has an even split of men and women as minimum wage earners.

~Trent Gilliss, executive editor

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A concern I have about my own side is, what the main activists in the pro-life or anti-abortion community want is an overturn of Roe vs. Wade. I am not at all convinced that if that were to actually happen that they would like the world that they would see on the other side.
- David Gushee, a Christian ethicist and professor at Mercer College, during his public dialogue with Frances Kissling, a long-time reproductive rights activist and former head of Catholics for Choice
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No issue in America is more intractable than abortion. Or is it? A conversation with long-time reproductive rights activist Frances Kissling and Christian ethicist David Gushee that doesn’t begin or end in the predictable places.

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fastcompany:


A Turkish performance artist who says he is “nothing” has become a symbol of Turkish protests. Erdem Gunduz has been dubbed the “Standing Man” after he stood motionless in Taksim Square for eight hours, between 6 p.m. and 2 a.m. local time, when he and other silent protesters were dispersed by the police.
Photo via Twitter, @snyx



With this interview from the BBC:
fastcompany:


A Turkish performance artist who says he is “nothing” has become a symbol of Turkish protests. Erdem Gunduz has been dubbed the “Standing Man” after he stood motionless in Taksim Square for eight hours, between 6 p.m. and 2 a.m. local time, when he and other silent protesters were dispersed by the police.
Photo via Twitter, @snyx



With this interview from the BBC:

fastcompany:

A Turkish performance artist who says he is “nothing” has become a symbol of Turkish protests. Erdem Gunduz has been dubbed the “Standing Man” after he stood motionless in Taksim Square for eight hours, between 6 p.m. and 2 a.m. local time, when he and other silent protesters were dispersed by the police.

Photo via Twitter, @snyx


With this interview from the BBC:

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For me, the privilege of handling the files of executed Bahá’ís is that it enabled me to view these believers from another time and place as part of my own life story. And though we are left with only memories, these soul scraps are more precious to me than any physical remains.

They are traces of human beings who learned to drink the bitter with the sweet. Memories of weddings, a favorite poem, and the dreams a young girl who dove headfirst into the ocean, arms and legs flying.

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Andréana Lefton (@AELefton) graces our blog this week with "A Dark Privilege: Bearing Witness to Victims and Prisoners of Conscience in Iran." Bahá’í leaders in Iran are being persecuted and imprisoned — simply for their faith. From a desk in London, Ms. Lefton reflects on their circumstances and how they remind her of the sacrifice and the richness of human life.

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Samuel Huntington was correct in looking toward culture as the boundary between Western and Eastern societies. But boundaries are ever-changing and values cross over between cultures by osmosis. To assume cultures are autarkic and unchanging is as erroneous as to assume that cultural distinctions are invariably resolvable. The truth about culture lies in the middle; values are transposable, which is why identity is most enthralling when they are tethered the least.
- Michael Young, from his op-ed What Does Muslim-Western Relations Mean?
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From a 2011 Pew Research Center report, a graphic showing the median percentage of Muslims across seven Muslim countries who say each of these traits describes people in Western countries and median percentage of non-Muslims across the U.S., Russia, and four Western European countries who say each of these traits describes Muslims.
I highly recommend reading Michael Young’s op-ed "What Does Muslim-Western Relations Mean?" that gets at these ideas about values, characteristics, and identity.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor
From a 2011 Pew Research Center report, a graphic showing the median percentage of Muslims across seven Muslim countries who say each of these traits describes people in Western countries and median percentage of non-Muslims across the U.S., Russia, and four Western European countries who say each of these traits describes Muslims.
I highly recommend reading Michael Young’s op-ed "What Does Muslim-Western Relations Mean?" that gets at these ideas about values, characteristics, and identity.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

From a 2011 Pew Research Center report, a graphic showing the median percentage of Muslims across seven Muslim countries who say each of these traits describes people in Western countries and median percentage of non-Muslims across the U.S., Russia, and four Western European countries who say each of these traits describes Muslims.

I highly recommend reading Michael Young’s op-ed "What Does Muslim-Western Relations Mean?" that gets at these ideas about values, characteristics, and identity.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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trentgilliss:

I fear the copious media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court’s handling of same-sex marriage might drowned out a pivotal case the Court is hearing right now. At stake is who owns the stuff of which we are made.

As Nina Totenberg reports for NPR, Myriad Genetics and ACLU are arguing about the patentability of our own genetic material. As Christopher Hansen of the American Civil Liberties Union argues:

“A patent isn’t a reward for effort. A patent is a reward for invention. And Myriad didn’t invent anything. The gene exists in the body. All Myriad did is find it.”

But, it may not be as simple as that. Research companies want to be compensated for their efforts. They want to ensure that their work is protected  from other profiteers. But, to what extent? Can human genes themselves be patented, or the mechanisms behind them? What is the right of companies like Myriad Genetics to be rewarded for their efforts that contributes to better clinical care and our social good? What are the ethical and moral responsibilities of these companies to put patients first and not keep them from their own genetic information?

Big questions with huge decisions that will impact us and our children.

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A reframed, redemptive conversation about same-sex marriage with the subject before the Supreme Court. Coming to the gay marriage debate from two, predictable opposing directions, David Blankenhorn and Jonathan Rauch both have an equal desire to strengthen the institution of marriage. They’re now showing all of us another way forward in grappling with the future of marriage.

This live event is part of On Being's continuing series, The Civil Conversations Project. Check it out. We are addressing all types of difficult topics, taking them head-on but from an angle.

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On this sad day commemorating 45 years since MLK’s death, a reminder that his message of nonviolence and the beloved community lives on in the work of one of his closest friends and confidants, Congressman John Lewis.

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An hour with the extraordinary humanity of Congressman John Lewis. The civil rights movement he helped animate was — as he tells it — love in action. He opens up the art and the discipline that made nonviolence work then — and that he offers up for our common life even today. John Lewis so gives voice to the meaning of Passover and Holy Week.

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