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On Being Tumblr

On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
Krista Tippett’s not-so-little boy Sebastian and his friends were kind enough to help us move over to Minneapolis today. #heightenvy
(via trentgilliss)
Krista Tippett’s not-so-little boy Sebastian and his friends were kind enough to help us move over to Minneapolis today. #heightenvy
(via trentgilliss)

Krista Tippett’s not-so-little boy Sebastian and his friends were kind enough to help us move over to Minneapolis today. #heightenvy

(via trentgilliss)

Tagged: #public radio
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Our technical director Chris Heagle explains the thinking behind a double-walled structure for On Being’s new sound studio.

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Decisions for building this studio are not over. Sound-rated doors and ceiling slats. What’s required? I and II, and degrees of III.
(via trentgilliss)
Decisions for building this studio are not over. Sound-rated doors and ceiling slats. What’s required? I and II, and degrees of III.
(via trentgilliss)

Decisions for building this studio are not over. Sound-rated doors and ceiling slats. What’s required? I and II, and degrees of III.

(via trentgilliss)

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In the end, we came up with a solution. Every “joist” was coped. All the rubber U channels affixed and batting placed in the floating floor. An air gap separates the interior studio walls from the exterior studio wall. This studio better be awfully quiet.
(via trentgilliss)
In the end, we came up with a solution. Every “joist” was coped. All the rubber U channels affixed and batting placed in the floating floor. An air gap separates the interior studio walls from the exterior studio wall. This studio better be awfully quiet.
(via trentgilliss)

In the end, we came up with a solution. Every “joist” was coped. All the rubber U channels affixed and batting placed in the floating floor. An air gap separates the interior studio walls from the exterior studio wall. This studio better be awfully quiet.

(via trentgilliss)

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Hey, check out this 3D rendering of the storefront of our new office on Hennepin Ave in Minneapolis. The building is located near Loring Park, which is the religious and cultural hub of the city — with the Basilica of St. Mary directly across the street, the Walker Art Center and Sculpture Garden a block away, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, and Minneapolis Community & Technical College just up the street.
The space pictured in the image above will be an intimate live events space. We can seat 25-60 (I prefer to keep it below 25) and we plan on having Krista Tippett (our host) conduct interviews next to the 17-foot library wall. But, we also hope to make it available for the community to hold informal salons and cultural exchanges that deepen our connection with the community. It’s a place of exchange and reciprocity, in which we as journalists and the media get a chance to learn and remember why we’re in this profession.
Here are two more renderings from different perspectives. From the front of the house looking into the space, you can see our studio with the herringbone pattern wrapped in Douglas fir:

And, from the back of the space looking toward Hennepin Avenue:


~Trent Gilliss, chief content officer
Hey, check out this 3D rendering of the storefront of our new office on Hennepin Ave in Minneapolis. The building is located near Loring Park, which is the religious and cultural hub of the city — with the Basilica of St. Mary directly across the street, the Walker Art Center and Sculpture Garden a block away, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, and Minneapolis Community & Technical College just up the street.
The space pictured in the image above will be an intimate live events space. We can seat 25-60 (I prefer to keep it below 25) and we plan on having Krista Tippett (our host) conduct interviews next to the 17-foot library wall. But, we also hope to make it available for the community to hold informal salons and cultural exchanges that deepen our connection with the community. It’s a place of exchange and reciprocity, in which we as journalists and the media get a chance to learn and remember why we’re in this profession.
Here are two more renderings from different perspectives. From the front of the house looking into the space, you can see our studio with the herringbone pattern wrapped in Douglas fir:

And, from the back of the space looking toward Hennepin Avenue:


~Trent Gilliss, chief content officer

Hey, check out this 3D rendering of the storefront of our new office on Hennepin Ave in Minneapolis. The building is located near Loring Park, which is the religious and cultural hub of the city — with the Basilica of St. Mary directly across the street, the Walker Art Center and Sculpture Garden a block away, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, and Minneapolis Community & Technical College just up the street.

The space pictured in the image above will be an intimate live events space. We can seat 25-60 (I prefer to keep it below 25) and we plan on having Krista Tippett (our host) conduct interviews next to the 17-foot library wall. But, we also hope to make it available for the community to hold informal salons and cultural exchanges that deepen our connection with the community. It’s a place of exchange and reciprocity, in which we as journalists and the media get a chance to learn and remember why we’re in this profession.

Here are two more renderings from different perspectives. From the front of the house looking into the space, you can see our studio with the herringbone pattern wrapped in Douglas fir:

20130820_Design Perspectives_with KTPP comments_Page_2

And, from the back of the space looking toward Hennepin Avenue:

20130820_Design Perspectives_with KTPP comments_Page_1

~Trent Gilliss, chief content officer

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From our chief of content trentgilliss:

Mapping On Being’s future with some brilliant folks: Will Rosenzweig, Krista Tippett, Graham Griffith, Mikel Ellcessor, Lily Percy, and Chris Heagle. I’m unembodied in the photo but my laptop stood in for me. (at Open Book in Minneapolis)
From our chief of content trentgilliss:

Mapping On Being’s future with some brilliant folks: Will Rosenzweig, Krista Tippett, Graham Griffith, Mikel Ellcessor, Lily Percy, and Chris Heagle. I’m unembodied in the photo but my laptop stood in for me. (at Open Book in Minneapolis)

From our chief of content trentgilliss:

Mapping On Being’s future with some brilliant folks: Will Rosenzweig, Krista Tippett, Graham Griffith, Mikel Ellcessor, Lily Percy, and Chris Heagle. I’m unembodied in the photo but my laptop stood in for me. (at Open Book in Minneapolis)

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Which wood species do you prefer for wrapping our studio exterior, bookshelves, and kitchen cabinets? Leave me a note, and I’ll tell you how it turns out.
Which wood species do you prefer for wrapping our studio exterior, bookshelves, and kitchen cabinets? Leave me a note, and I’ll tell you how it turns out.

Which wood species do you prefer for wrapping our studio exterior, bookshelves, and kitchen cabinets? Leave me a note, and I’ll tell you how it turns out.

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We’re fascinated with outer space, but there’s a place on earth that’s just as alien — and just as mysterious. It’s the bottom of the ocean, and Sylvia Earle has walked there:

"[I walked] on the bottom, two and a half hours, and I later spoke with an astronaut friend, Buzz Aldrin, and he said, ‘Well, that’s about as long as we had to walk on the moon, two and a half hours.’ But what they did not have on the moon, Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong and those who came later, they didn’t have just this avalanche of life, this great diversity all around. Everywhere you looked, there were little fish with lights down the side. Of course, the corals themselves are alive. There were little burrows of creatures that were dwelling in the sediments on the sea floor. The water itself is like minestrone, except all the little bits are alive."

And that life of the ocean sustains all life on earth. Sylvia Earle takes us there with singular urgency and passion.

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trentgilliss:

The lease is signed! On Being is now the proud tenant of 1619 Hennepin on Loring Park. A party will ensue. Yes, that’s Krista Tippett and Tom Fletcher (the landlord).
trentgilliss:

The lease is signed! On Being is now the proud tenant of 1619 Hennepin on Loring Park. A party will ensue. Yes, that’s Krista Tippett and Tom Fletcher (the landlord).

trentgilliss:

The lease is signed! On Being is now the proud tenant of 1619 Hennepin on Loring Park. A party will ensue. Yes, that’s Krista Tippett and Tom Fletcher (the landlord).

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I kind of think of this interview as a show for those of us on summer holiday. As you’re driving or hiking or sailing, geomorphologist David Montgomery helps you see the world around you differently — through the lens of geology. As I was driving through the Black Hills (Paha Sapa in Lakota) of South Dakota this past week, I looked at the canted rock formations differently. And I found a deeper appreciation for the push and pull between religion and science has shaped advances in geology from the beginning.

And, if you’re looking for some good dinner table conversation, you really ought to listen to David Montgomery talk about how Noah’s Flood might actually be rooted in an historical event — of the Mediterranean rising so high that it spilt over into the valley of the Black Sea. Or, my favorite line: plate tectonics is to geology what DNA is to biology.

Montgomery tells us how the evolution of landscapes and geological processes shape ecology and humanity, and , how we should read rocks for the stories they tell about who we are and where we came from:

"Geology really is, essentially, the scientific creation story. How did it really work? What can we tell from the nature of the universe around us that would inform us in our thinking about how we got to the place we are now? I think that really is central to our sort of view of ourselves as a species, our place in the universe, as well as sort of your personal relationship to the universe. What am I doing here?"

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KTPP studios get a bit of a makeover in the planning stages. Oh, when will the revisions end…
KTPP studios get a bit of a makeover in the planning stages. Oh, when will the revisions end…

KTPP studios get a bit of a makeover in the planning stages. Oh, when will the revisions end…

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"I think trauma really does confront you with the best and the worst. You see the horrendous things that people do to each other, but you also see resiliency, the power of love, the power of caring, the power of commitment, the power of commitment to oneself, the knowledge that there are things that are larger than our individual survival. And in some ways, I don’t think you can appreciate the glory of life unless you also know the dark side of life."

Bessel van der Kolk has come to see human memory as a sensory experience. The trauma researcher and psychiatrist shares what he and others are learning on this edge of humanity about the complexity of memory, our need for others, and how our brains take care of our bodies.

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"When you live in a city like Detroit, it’s not just buildings that have become ruins. It’s that a way of life, a way of thinking has died and something else has been born — a new culture, a new spirit. And I think that’s what you get in Detroit if you are able to look past the ruins. What an opportunity. What a time to be alive."

Here’s a different story about Detroit. With the recent news coverage of its declaration of bankruptcy, we travel to a city of vigor where joyful, passionate people are reimagining work, food, and the very meaning of humanity. Grace Lee Boggs, a Chinese-American philosopher and civil rights legend, is the heart and soul of this largely hidden story, which holds lessons for us all.

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On one of the loudest holiday weekends of the year, a show about the importance of silence. Being a boy from the Dakota prairie, this week’s show with acoustic ecologist Gordon Hempton just tugs at my heart strings.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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For as far back as Joy Ladin can remember, her body didn’t match her soul. Gender defines us from the moment we’re born. But, how is that related to the lifelong work of being at home in ourselves? You’ve got to check out our show this week, "Gender and the Syntax of Being." Krista’s interview with her explores this question through Joy’s story of transition from male to female — as a poet, as a parent, and as a the first openly transgender woman teaching in an Orthodox Jewish world.

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