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On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
I’d love to know how many Spaniards passed this tree. Maybe even Ponce de Leon as he searched for the “Fountain of Youth” on the Ichetuknee River.
- —Jay Jackson from Matthews, North Carolina on “Planting the Future”
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Thursday SurpriseAndy Dayton, Associate Web ProducerOn Thursday afternoon we received our first reflection for our program with Jon Kabat-Zinn, an account of one man’s experiences with meditation. The author wrote about attending a meditation retreat, and the effect it had on his life:
During the retreat I felt as if I caught a glimpse of the true power and limitless potential of the spirit — a glimpse sufficient to propel me into deeper practice. Also, during that same retreat, the idea for a life-transforming environmental road trip project dropped into my consciousness. It resonated so profoundly with me that I decided to embrace it fully — resulting in YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip — a trip to all 50 United States to explore and personalize environmental sustainability through fun, engaging short films and other forms of new media.
What caught my attention was the name: Mark Dixon, who actually came here to interview Krista for the YERT project  just under a year ago. I took some video of the three team members as they talked to Krista, asked them a few questions, and then blogged about it.
One of the things I love about the messages we receive from our audience are the little surprises they hold. It’s less common that I’ll recognize somebody’s name, but they frequently contain wonderful insight from our listeners and readers. We shuttle these messages around the office, giving us a chance to pat ourselves on the back, reevaluate some of the choices we’ve made, or simply appreciate the stories they contain.After including your thoughts as part of each program’s Web site for the last five years, starting with the Kabat-Zinn program we’ve refreshed the Reflections section to give your responses a better home. Now we’re including your images to provide visual accompaniment to your words, and allowing you to find responses nearby or across the world using an interactive map. We’re planning to start using this format for every new program we produce, and hopefully a few repeats as well.
You can check out the reflections for “Opening to Our Lives” here, and leave a comment on this blog to let us know what you think.

Thursday Surprise
Andy Dayton, Associate Web Producer

On Thursday afternoon we received our first reflection for our program with Jon Kabat-Zinn, an account of one man’s experiences with meditation. The author wrote about attending a meditation retreat, and the effect it had on his life:

During the retreat I felt as if I caught a glimpse of the true power and limitless potential of the spirit — a glimpse sufficient to propel me into deeper practice. Also, during that same retreat, the idea for a life-transforming environmental road trip project dropped into my consciousness. It resonated so profoundly with me that I decided to embrace it fully — resulting in YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip — a trip to all 50 United States to explore and personalize environmental sustainability through fun, engaging short films and other forms of new media.

What caught my attention was the name: Mark Dixon, who actually came here to interview Krista for the YERT project just under a year ago. I took some video of the three team members as they talked to Krista, asked them a few questions, and then blogged about it.

One of the things I love about the messages we receive from our audience are the little surprises they hold. It’s less common that I’ll recognize somebody’s name, but they frequently contain wonderful insight from our listeners and readers. We shuttle these messages around the office, giving us a chance to pat ourselves on the back, reevaluate some of the choices we’ve made, or simply appreciate the stories they contain.

After including your thoughts as part of each program’s Web site for the last five years, starting with the Kabat-Zinn program we’ve refreshed the Reflections section to give your responses a better home. Now we’re including your images to provide visual accompaniment to your words, and allowing you to find responses nearby or across the world using an interactive map. We’re planning to start using this format for every new program we produce, and hopefully a few repeats as well.

You can check out the reflections for “Opening to Our Lives” here, and leave a comment on this blog to let us know what you think.

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Response to “The Ethics of Aid”

Krista Tippett, Host

I’ve been fascinated by the responses that have come in to our program with Binyavanga Wainaina. They’ve come in part from other Africans and from current and former NGOs, missionaries, and Peace Corps volunteers. This felt like a huge and daunting, yet pressing, subject to open up. And that’s clearly what we’ve done — not started a conversation but opened it a little wider; the questions and concerns he articulated are present in many closest to this work.

I’m especially intrigued, as well, by one e-mail we received from New Orleans, drawing parallels between aid to post-Katrina New Orleans and aid to Africa. It is a stunning reflection on how, even domestically, the dramatic gesture is deceptively satisfying. Most of all I’m pleased that so many found Binyavanga Wainaina’s insights emboldening, as I did. His hard truth-telling — even his satire — is the opposite of a call to cynicism. It is a call to attentiveness to the deeper truth of ourselves and the other.

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