On Being Tumblr

On Being Tumblr

On Being with Krista Tippett is a public radio project delving into the human side of news stories + issues. Curated + edited by senior editor Trent Gilliss.

We publish guest contributions. We edit long; we scrapbook. We do big ideas + deep meaning. We answer questions.

We've even won a couple of Webbys + a Peabody Award.
What makes me a believer is that from time to time, there have been glimpses I’ve had which have made me suspect the presence of something extraordinary and beyond the realm of the immediate. You encounter the holy in various forms, which, unless you have your eyes open, you might not even notice.
- Frederick BuechnerFrederick Buechner, writer and theologian from his 2006 interview on Religion & Ethics Newsweekly
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The space next to me bristles with silence. The emptiness is palpable. Loss isn’t an absence after all. It is a presence. A strong presence next to me.
-

Jackie Kay, from Trumpet 

Excellent thought as I sit in the darkness on this early November morn.

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trentgilliss:

Since I just returned from old Constantinople, this track from The Decemberists performing live at WDET studios in 2005 takes on new resonance.

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Jane Goodall at the Halki Summit
Over the course of three days on the island of Heybeliada across from Istanbul, our host Krista Tippett moderated a plethora of panels at the Halki Summit on Global Responsibility & Environmental Sustainability. One of the keynote speakers we found so endearing was primatologist Jane Goodall, whom may give Justin Bieber or Bono a run for his money in the world of superstar fandom. It seems that there was no one present who wasn’t captivated by her presence.
We recorded her keynote address and will try to make the audio available later this week.
Photo by Trent Gilliss
Jane Goodall at the Halki Summit
Over the course of three days on the island of Heybeliada across from Istanbul, our host Krista Tippett moderated a plethora of panels at the Halki Summit on Global Responsibility & Environmental Sustainability. One of the keynote speakers we found so endearing was primatologist Jane Goodall, whom may give Justin Bieber or Bono a run for his money in the world of superstar fandom. It seems that there was no one present who wasn’t captivated by her presence.
We recorded her keynote address and will try to make the audio available later this week.
Photo by Trent Gilliss

Jane Goodall at the Halki Summit

Over the course of three days on the island of Heybeliada across from Istanbul, our host Krista Tippett moderated a plethora of panels at the Halki Summit on Global Responsibility & Environmental Sustainability. One of the keynote speakers we found so endearing was primatologist Jane Goodall, whom may give Justin Bieber or Bono a run for his money in the world of superstar fandom. It seems that there was no one present who wasn’t captivated by her presence.

We recorded her keynote address and will try to make the audio available later this week.

Photo by Trent Gilliss

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Loving the woodcut feel of these book cover illustrations for the Evelyn Waugh series from Back Bay Books. (Taken with instagram)
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Loving the woodcut feel of these book cover illustrations for the Evelyn Waugh series from Back Bay Books. (Taken with instagram)
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Loving the woodcut feel of these book cover illustrations for the Evelyn Waugh series from Back Bay Books. (Taken with instagram)

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Sarah Kay Performs “B” at the Bowery

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

We hijacked the audio from this performance of “B” for this week’s podcast featuring our interview with spoken word poet Sarah Kay. Note: the very first words of the poem, “If I should have a daughter” are missing (and it contains an expletive).

Krista preferred the intimacy and relaxed style of this presentation at the Bowery Poetry Club in 2008 over her performance at TED2011:

What’s your take?

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trentgilliss:

Elizabeth Cotten’s “Freight Train” is just what I needed this evening.

(h/t to Jeff Guntzel)

We haven’t posted a Tuesday evening melody in several weeks. And this ditty couldn’t be a more fitting reentry.

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Is Our Political Identity Overtaking Our Religious Identity When Choosing a Mate?
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Stephanie Coontz’s provocative opinion piece in today’s New York Times touches on some interesting dilemmas facing men and women in modern America. It’s well worth reading and is a fun conversation starter with your spouse and parents. But, it was the above infographic accompanying Coontz’s commentary that caught this editor’s eye.
For the most part, the top five traits that men look for in potential wives have changed very little in 70 years. In 1939, the five most important qualities were:
Dependable character
Emotional stability, maturity
Pleasing disposition
Mutual attraction, love
Good health
And, in 2008:
Mutual attraction, love
Dependable character
Emotional stability, maturity
Education, intelligence
Pleasing disposition
The big mover: education and  intelligence. It climbed from #11 to #4. Good health dropped two positions, and I suspect will plummet further down the list in the coming decades. The romantic in me is heartened to see that love and attraction are sitting atop the field.
For the purposes of this blog, though, the precipitous drop in having a similar religious background and the slight rise in men seeking a woman whose political background is similar to his own is intriguing. It seems men’s personal identities are mirroring our larger cultural identity. As U.S. society has become increasingly divided and hyper-partisan in political terms, men are assigning more value to having a like-minded partner in the political persuasion department. Will this trait continue to rise in importance? I hope not.
Source: “Measuring Mate Preferences: A Replication and Extension” by Christine B. Whelan, University of Pittsburgh, and Christie F. Boxer and Mary Noonan, University of Iowa
Is Our Political Identity Overtaking Our Religious Identity When Choosing a Mate?
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Stephanie Coontz’s provocative opinion piece in today’s New York Times touches on some interesting dilemmas facing men and women in modern America. It’s well worth reading and is a fun conversation starter with your spouse and parents. But, it was the above infographic accompanying Coontz’s commentary that caught this editor’s eye.
For the most part, the top five traits that men look for in potential wives have changed very little in 70 years. In 1939, the five most important qualities were:
Dependable character
Emotional stability, maturity
Pleasing disposition
Mutual attraction, love
Good health
And, in 2008:
Mutual attraction, love
Dependable character
Emotional stability, maturity
Education, intelligence
Pleasing disposition
The big mover: education and  intelligence. It climbed from #11 to #4. Good health dropped two positions, and I suspect will plummet further down the list in the coming decades. The romantic in me is heartened to see that love and attraction are sitting atop the field.
For the purposes of this blog, though, the precipitous drop in having a similar religious background and the slight rise in men seeking a woman whose political background is similar to his own is intriguing. It seems men’s personal identities are mirroring our larger cultural identity. As U.S. society has become increasingly divided and hyper-partisan in political terms, men are assigning more value to having a like-minded partner in the political persuasion department. Will this trait continue to rise in importance? I hope not.
Source: “Measuring Mate Preferences: A Replication and Extension” by Christine B. Whelan, University of Pittsburgh, and Christie F. Boxer and Mary Noonan, University of Iowa

Is Our Political Identity Overtaking Our Religious Identity When Choosing a Mate?

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Stephanie Coontz’s provocative opinion piece in today’s New York Times touches on some interesting dilemmas facing men and women in modern America. It’s well worth reading and is a fun conversation starter with your spouse and parents. But, it was the above infographic accompanying Coontz’s commentary that caught this editor’s eye.

For the most part, the top five traits that men look for in potential wives have changed very little in 70 years. In 1939, the five most important qualities were:

  1. Dependable character
  2. Emotional stability, maturity
  3. Pleasing disposition
  4. Mutual attraction, love
  5. Good health

And, in 2008:

  1. Mutual attraction, love
  2. Dependable character
  3. Emotional stability, maturity
  4. Education, intelligence
  5. Pleasing disposition

The big mover: education and intelligence. It climbed from #11 to #4. Good health dropped two positions, and I suspect will plummet further down the list in the coming decades. The romantic in me is heartened to see that love and attraction are sitting atop the field.

For the purposes of this blog, though, the precipitous drop in having a similar religious background and the slight rise in men seeking a woman whose political background is similar to his own is intriguing. It seems men’s personal identities are mirroring our larger cultural identity. As U.S. society has become increasingly divided and hyper-partisan in political terms, men are assigning more value to having a like-minded partner in the political persuasion department. Will this trait continue to rise in importance? I hope not.

Source: “Measuring Mate Preferences: A Replication and Extension” by Christine B. Whelan, University of Pittsburgh, and Christie F. Boxer and Mary Noonan, University of Iowa

Comments
Anonymous asked:
I've got my black socks. I've got my sandles. I've got my stretchy pants pulled half way up my chest, and I don't care what anyone thinks. Aww, man. This is heaven, it really is. What do you think?

Dear Anonymous—

This, is heavenly.

Vatican Museum

This, is not.

The new socks and sandals?

This, is heavenly.

Southall, London, England - School playground

This, is not.

Sandals + bags + newspaper

This, is heavenly.

Stepping out . . .

This, is not.

Kogans053

This, is heavenly.

Geyser Lookout Nevada 2

This, is not.

Sandals with socks

And these, well, it depends on your seasonal desires…

Down by the Water Trough

…and if you’re a cat lover.

Variegated

Thanks for indulging me,
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Before we marry the guy next door, don’t you think we ought to have a fling with a tall dark stranger and see if he can support us in the manner to which we’d like to be accustomed?
-

Dr. Richard LandRichard Land of the Southern Baptist Convention

Does anybody else find this statement by a leading Evangelical voice a bit incongruous? I understand what he’s getting at — not settling for Mitt Romney when there may be a better alternative for Evangelicals and social conservatives — but it seems quite strange for the president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention to be advocating for a political affair, if you will. The language is just so odd.

By the way, this quotation was excerpted from Barbara Bradley Hagerty’s excellent piece on today’s NPR Morning Edition. If you are interested in politics and/or kingmaking, this report is for you.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Jay Smooth TED Talk about Race and Pockets of Prejudice

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

"We are not good despite our imperfections. It is the connection we maintain with our imperfections that allow us to be good."

Don’t you just wanna stand up and shout Amen! when you read this? Or at least nod in solid agreement with this profound statement that cuts to the quick of the essence of being human?

Jay Smooth, the video blogger of Ill Doctrine and founder of New York’s longest-running hip-hop radio in New York, WBAI’s Underground Railroad, gave a refreshing talk at TEDx Hampshire College about the ways we can have better discussions about race and racism. He’s funny and this talk is truly enjoyable. More importantly, it’s his astute observations about the ways in which these discussions devolve that’s worth noting.

He points out that discussions about race often border on matters of being a “good person” or a “bad person” — a matter of “who you are” rather than “what you said.” He reminds us that talking about issues of race is like bodily hygiene: it’s something you have to do and keep up every day. And, he says, when we embrace our own imperfections we are on the path to becoming a good person, a better human being.

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Hey, this photo triggered the fact that we may be traveling to Turkey this summer for a production trip. Now I’m excited all over again! Thansk, Condenast Traveler:

Istanbul’s Lush Life | Hagia Sophia

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
Hey, this photo triggered the fact that we may be traveling to Turkey this summer for a production trip. Now I’m excited all over again! Thansk, Condenast Traveler:

Istanbul’s Lush Life | Hagia Sophia

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Hey, this photo triggered the fact that we may be traveling to Turkey this summer for a production trip. Now I’m excited all over again! Thansk, Condenast Traveler:

Istanbul’s Lush Life | Hagia Sophia

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Comments
A Bittersweet Picture
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
This week we bid a fond farewell to our executive producer Kate Moos (house left, as they say, in the photo above). After more than eight years on the show, she is moving on to greener pastures. She’s not leaving us officially until the end of the calendar year, but as we cross 2012’s threshold, she’ll be starting a new project for American Public Media (our parent company) that will tap in to the organization’s Public Insight Network to deliver news stories on a variety of platforms, which are sourced from deep within the communities that surround us.
Big opportunity. Big project. Big ideas. And a big mind to handle it all. She’ll be missed, but she’ll still be just down the hall. Farewell, Kate Moos!
(Photo: Instagram by Trent Gilliss)
A Bittersweet Picture
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor
This week we bid a fond farewell to our executive producer Kate Moos (house left, as they say, in the photo above). After more than eight years on the show, she is moving on to greener pastures. She’s not leaving us officially until the end of the calendar year, but as we cross 2012’s threshold, she’ll be starting a new project for American Public Media (our parent company) that will tap in to the organization’s Public Insight Network to deliver news stories on a variety of platforms, which are sourced from deep within the communities that surround us.
Big opportunity. Big project. Big ideas. And a big mind to handle it all. She’ll be missed, but she’ll still be just down the hall. Farewell, Kate Moos!
(Photo: Instagram by Trent Gilliss)

A Bittersweet Picture

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

This week we bid a fond farewell to our executive producer Kate Moos (house left, as they say, in the photo above). After more than eight years on the show, she is moving on to greener pastures. She’s not leaving us officially until the end of the calendar year, but as we cross 2012’s threshold, she’ll be starting a new project for American Public Media (our parent company) that will tap in to the organization’s Public Insight Network to deliver news stories on a variety of platforms, which are sourced from deep within the communities that surround us.

Big opportunity. Big project. Big ideas. And a big mind to handle it all. She’ll be missed, but she’ll still be just down the hall. Farewell, Kate Moos!

(Photo: Instagram by Trent Gilliss)

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Anonymous asked:
how can I listen to On Being on my Kindle Fire??

Good morning, Anonymous—

Listening to On Being on the Kindle FireI’m going to do a partial punt on this one because none of us on staff have a Kindle Fire, and thus do not have an intimate knowledge of the device that might offer you specific steps. That said, we do offer each weekly show and unedited interview via podcast or as individual downloads on each episode’s show page at the On Being website. I’ll defer to our readers and Tumblr dashboard audience to offer better advice on apps that might make this experience easier.

I am one of those cats who uses Amazon’s Cloud service. A lot. Perhaps I can offer a possible workaround in which you download the mp3 to your device and then sync it to your Amazon Cloud account. That way you can use the native music player to stream your favorite On Being episodes without having to hound-dog them on your device!

When you find a solution, please let me know what works best. We’re starting to receive a number of questions about Kindles and I’d like to be able to share your solutions with others.

Happy holidays,
Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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Our former web producer Andy Dayton is making his art dreams come true in the Big Apple! Very cool, Andy:

notioncollective:

Hey, our project Station Identification was listed in the most recent issue of Forecast’s Public Art Review (under “Recent Projects”). I’ll take that!

Yay!

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

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